Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #68

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #68

Eleven players have worn #68 for the Cowboys. This includes five defensive linemen and six offensive linemen.

Michael Batiste, DT, Tulane, 1995

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played less than one full season with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Batiste made the team in 1995 but was only active for a handful of games. He played defensive tackle for the Cowboys but later played offensive line for the Redskins.

Jim Boeke, T, Heidelberg, 1964-67

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played four seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: The Cowboys acquired Boeke in 1964, and he became a starter by the end of that season. He eventually lost his job to Tony Liscio. He committed a rather infamous penalty in the 1966 NFL Championship Game by jumping before the snap when the Cowboys had the ball on the Packer one-yard-line.

Frank Cornish, C, UCLA, 1992-94

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played three seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Cornish was Troy Aikman’s center at UCLA and was a backup with the Cowboys. He started a few games in relief of Mark Stepnoski.

Update (8/24/08): Cornish tragically died at the age of 40 in his Southlake home. Here is more.

Doug Free, OT, N. Illinois, 2007-present

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Free enters his second season with Dallas in 2008.

Intangibles: Free was a fourth-round pick in 2007 but has seldom seen action thus far.

Thomas Johnson, DT, Middle Tennessee State, 2005

Statistics: Johnson recorded one tackle with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played less than one full season with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Johnson saw very limited action with Dallas in 2005.

Crawford Ker, G, Florida, 1985-90

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played six seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Ker was a solid starter during the mid- to late-1980s, but he fell out of favor with Jimmy Johnson. He left via free agency in 1991. According to this story, he has managed a WingHouse restaurant in Florida.

Matt Lehr, C/G, Virgina Tech, 2001-04

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played four seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Lehr at one point earned a spot as the starting center for the Cowboys. He later started for Atlanta and played in 2007 with Tampa Bay. He has more recently been caught up in a steroid scandal.

Guy Reese, DT, Southern Methodist, 1962-63

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Reese played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: A native of Dallas, he was a drafted by both the Dallas Cowboys and the Dallas Texans. However, he was traded to Baltimore after two seasons.

Oliver Ross, T, Iowa State, 1998

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Ross was a fifth-round pick in 1998 but seldom played. He was later a starter with Pittsburgh and Arizona.

Noel Scarlett, DT, Langston, 2000

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Scarlett was picked up in 2000 as a free agent, but he made the active roster only once.

Herbert Scott, G, Virginia Union, 1975-84

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: He made three Pro Bowls and was named to two All-Pro teams.

Longevity: Scott played ten seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Scott was part of both the Dirty Dozen of the 1975 draft and became a starter in 1976. He was great at both open-field blocks and at pass blocking. Injuries slowed him up towards the end of his career, when he saw action at tackle.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #68.

Greatest #68

  • Herbert Scott (83%, 90 Votes)
  • Crawford Ker (5%, 5 Votes)
  • Matt Lehr (4%, 4 Votes)
  • Frank Cornish (3%, 3 Votes)
  • Doug Free (2%, 2 Votes)
  • Oliver Ross (2%, 2 Votes)
  • Jim Boeke (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Noel Scarlett (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Thomas Johnson (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Guy Reese (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Michael Batiste (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 108

Loading ... Loading ...

My Vote: Scott

Herb ScottFor this series, Scott is the last of the “Four Irishmen and a Scott,” consisting of Scott, John Fitzgerald, Jim Cooper, Pat Donovan, and Tom Rafferty. He was one of the top guards in the game during the late 1970s, and he just as talented as two guards who preceded him: John Niland and Blaine Nye.

Ker was not a bad player, but he was nothing compared to Scott. Lehr started for one season but was quickly replaced by Al Johnson in 2004.

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Article by Matt Cordon

Blogging impatiently about the Cowboys since 2006. Being a fan since 1977 hasn't required quite as much patience.
  • Fred Goodwin

    Another 70s era Cowboy deserving of HOF consideration.

  • Anonymous

    In my opinion, Herb Scott is one of the best lineman of his time and one of the best guards Dallas has ever had. If my (feeble) memory is correct, he rarely got holding penalties and was a terrific pass protector too. Definitely a HOF level player.

  • http://godfatheroftech.blogspot.com GodFatherofTech

    Another great choice.

    First preseason game this weekend!

  • Pingback: Recap: Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers, Nos. 1-69 | Know Your Dallas Cowboys: The Blog()

  • melonball

    Wasn’t it Herb Scott’s block that sprung Dorsett on his 99 yarder?

    Also, I think Oliver Ross actually went to a Pro Bowl with the Steelers. I remember he pissed the Cowboys off during the offseason of ’99 when he refused to go to NFL Europe, so that’s why the Cowboys got rid of him. He cashed in his one big season with the Steelers into a big signing bonus with the Cards and then was a total bust there. Not enough heart.

  • http://www.knowyourdallascowboys.com kickholder

    On the 99-yarder, Rafferty took out the left tackle, while Scott trapped from left guard. The middle linebacker tried to crash the hole, but Scott stood him straight up. These two blocks were primarily what sprung Dorsett.

    None of the lists I’ve seen have Ross in a Pro Bowl. He may very well have been an alternate, but I have not seen a reference of this about him.

    Ross reminded me a bit of Ron Stone, except I don’t think Stone had as much of an attitude problem.

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