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Cowboys Jersey Numbers Update

#95 Tank Johnson

#95 Tank Johnson

Thanks to Nick Eatman’s blog, we know that there have been some number changes lately:

#23— Running back Tashard Choice has given up #29 to wear #23, which was vacated when Dallas released Evan Oglesby.

#29— Keith Davis is getting his old number back (note that Davis also wore #40 early in his career).

#66— Tank Johnson has given up on this number in favor of #95.

#95— Tank Johnson’s new number.

Trivia: Cowboys-Browns Photo

I haven’t asked many trivia questions lately, but this one may be interesting. Take a look at this picture (click on it to see a larger size) and then answer the questions that appear below it.

Cowboys vs. Browns, 1960s

Cowboys vs. Browns, 1960s

Questions:

1. In what year was this game played?

2. Who was the quarterback for the Cowboys in this picture?

3. In what year did the Cowboys begin displaying their names on the backs of their jerseys?

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #88

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #88

Nine players have worn #88 for the Cowboys. This includes six wide receivers, a linebacker, a tight end, and a punter/kicker.

Antonio Bryant, WR, Pittsburgh, 2002-04

Statistics: Bryant caught 99 passes for 1549 yards and 8 TDs with Dallas.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played less than three full seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: The highly talented Bryant has yet to find a way to stay out of trouble. He lasted just over two seasons in Dallas before the Cowboys sent him packing.

Sonny Davis, LB, Baylor, 1961

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Davis was a wide receiver at Baylor, but the Cowboys tried to convert him to linebacker. He saw little action during his one pro season.

Jackie Harris, TE, Northwest Louisiana, 2000-01

Statistics: Harris caught 54 passes for 447 yards and seven touchdowns with Dallas.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Harris was a starter in Green Bay, Tampa Bay, and Tennessee before Dallas signed him in 2000 to replace David LeFleur. He was adequate for the two years he played in Dallas.

Michael Irvin, WR, Miami, Fla., 1988-99

Statistics: Irvin caught 750 passes for 11,904 yards and 65 TDs with the Cowboys.

Accolades: Five Pro Bowls, All-Decade Team of the 1990s, Ring of Honor, and Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Longevity: Irvin played 12 seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Irvin was a physical receiver who could fill roles as both a possession receiver and as a big playmaker. He was the most vocal (and obviously most flamboyant) of the leaders on the 1990s teams, but he always backed up his talk with his play. His 1995 season (111 rec., 1603 yds.) is easily the greatest single season for any Dallas receiver, and he accomplished it even though every opponent knew he was the primary weapon in the passing game.

Drew Pearson, WR, Tulsa, 1973-83

Statistics: Pearson caught 489 passes for 7822 yards and 48 TDs.

Accolades: Three Pro Bowls and three All-Pro teams. He was also a member of the All-Decade Team for the 1970s.

Longevity: He played 11 seasons in the NFL, all with Dallas.

Intangibles: Pearson was a free agent who became the team’s top receiver during the Cowboys’ resurgence in the mid-1970s. He was a clutch receiver who made as many big plays in big games as any player in team history.

Sonny Randle, WR, Virginia, 1968

Statistics: Randle caught one pass for 12 yards with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None with Dallas. He made four Pro Bowls with the Rams.

Longevity: He played less than a full season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Dallas picked up Randle in 1968 after he spent several seasons with the Rams, Cardinals, and 49ers. He retired after the 1968 season.

Colin Ridgway, P/K, Lamar Tech, 1965

Statistics: Ridgway averaged 39.2 yards on 13 punts for the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played less than a full season for the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Ridgway competed in the Olympics in the high jump for Australia in 1956. He spent most of his time in Dallas on the taxi squad. Tragically, he was a murder victim in 1993 in a crime that has never been solved.

Reggie Rucker, WR, Boston University, 1970-71

Statistics: Sellers caught 10 passes for 219 yards and two touchdowns for the Cowboys.

Accolades: None with Dallas.

Longevity: He played less than two full seasons for the Cowboys before being traded to the Giants.

Intangibles: Rucker is best remembered as member of the Cleveland Browns. He finished his career with more than 7000 yards, but only a few were with the Cowboys.

Ron Sellers, WR, Florida State, 1972

Statistics: Sellers caught 31 passes for 653 yards and five touchdowns with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None with Dallas.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Sellers caught Roger Staubach’s last-minute touchdown pass in the 1972 playoff win over San Francisco. That happened to be his final catch as a Cowboy, as he was traded to Miami in 1973.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #88.

Note from 9/2: Thanks to an “upgrade” to my WordPress software, I was having trouble with the poll plugin. I think I have fixed it. I incorporated the results from the Zoho poll (below) into this poll:

Greatest #88

  • Michael Irvin (82%, 164 Votes)
  • Drew Pearson (17%, 34 Votes)
  • Jackie Harris (1%, 2 Votes)
  • Sonny Davis (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Antonio Bryant (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Sonny Randle (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Colin Ridgway (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Reggie Rucker (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Ron Sellers (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 199

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Here is the Zoho poll in case anyone is still having problems.

My Vote: Irvin

Michael IrvinWhen I set out to conduct this poll, the debate over the greatest #88 is what came to mind first. The stats clearly support Irvin, but this one is about more than stats. Both made plays that created their legends, and the Cowboys’ franchise wouldn’t have been what it was during either of their eras. What gives Irvin my vote is that he was greater for a longer period of time. From 1991 to 1998, he was the centerpiece of the Cowboys’ passing attack, and he consistently came through in the biggest moments. By comparison, Pearson became less and less of a primary target as his career progressed, and he finished behind Tony Hill in receptions during each of Pearson’s final six seasons. We can only pick one here, and my vote has to go to Irvin.

Episode 12 of Know Your Dallas Cowboys, The Show: Browns vs. Cowboys Classic Rivalry

Given the lack of viewers, we decided to rename our show from 10 Minutes to Know Your Dallas Cowboys to Know Your Dallas Cowboys: The Show so that we could produce episodes that were less than 10 minutes long. As it turns out, this show ended up being just about 10 minutes long, thus meaning that we just changed the name for really no good reason.

Here is some background information that relates to the show:

Between 1960 and 1970, Dallas faced Cleveland 20 times, including the playoffs. The Browns won 14 of those games, including two huge playoff games at the end of the 1960s. You might or might not know the names of some of the Cowboy-killers of the decade: Jim Brown (232 yards vs. Dallas in 1963); Bobby Mitchell (3 TDs in 1960; 140 rushing yards in 1962); Rich Kreitling (several touchdown receptions vs. Dallas); Gary Collins (same); Paul Warfield (same); Frank Ryan (Cleveland QB); Bill Nelson (Cleveland QB); Leroy Kelly (another of Cleveland’s Hall of Fame RBs).

This series was not all bad news for Dallas, though. The Cowboys pulled off one of their best performance in early franchise history when they routed the Browns 45-21 on December 2, 1962. The picture below (also featured in the clip) show Amos Marsh running for a few of his 117 yards that day.

Dallas Cowboys, Cleveland Browns, Amos Marsh

Cleveland currently leads the series, 17-11. Below is a list of each of the games, which are linked to the box scores available at Pro-Football-Reference.com

Oct. 16, 1960 (at Dallas): Cleveland 48, Dallas 7
Oct. 1, 1961 (at Cleveland): Cleveland 25, Dallas 7
Dec. 3, 1961 (at Dallas): Cleveland 38, Dallas 17
Oct. 7, 1962 (at Cleveland): Cleveland 19, Dallas 10
Dec. 2, 1962 (at Dallas): Dallas 45, Cleveland 21
Sept. 22, 1963 (at Dallas): Cleveland 41, Dallas 24
Nov. 24, 1963 (at Cleveland): Cleveland 27, Dallas 17
Oct. 4, 1964 (at Cleveland): Cleveland 27, Dallas 6
Oct. 18, 1964 (at Dallas): Cleveland 20, Dallas 16
Oct. 17, 1965 (at Cleveland): Cleveland 23, Dallas 17
Nov. 21, 1965 (at Dallas): Cleveland 24, Dallas 17

Oct. 23, 1966 (at Cleveland): Cleveland 30, Dallas 21
Nov. 24, 1966 (at Dallas): Dallas 26, Cleveland 14
Sept. 17, 1967 (at Cleveland): Dallas 21, Cleveland 14

NFL PlayoffsDec. 24, 1967 (at Dallas): Dallas 52, Cleveland 14

Sept. 22, 1968 (at Dallas): Dallas 28, Cleveland 7

NFL PlayoffsDec. 21, 1968 (at Cleveland): Cleveland 31, Dallas 20

Nov. 2, 1969 (at Cleveland): Cleveland 42, Dallas 10

NFL PlayoffsDec. 28, 1969 (at Dallas): Cleveland 38, Dallas 14

Dec. 12, 1970 (at Cleveland): Dallas 6, Cleveland 2
Dec. 7, 1974 (at Dallas): Dallas 41, Cleveland 17
Sept. 24, 1979 (at Cleveland): Cleveland 26, Dallas 7
Nov. 25, 1982 (at Dallas): Dallas 31, Cleveland 14
Sept. 22, 1985 (at Dallas): Dallas 20, Cleveland 7
Dec. 4, 1988 (at Cleveland): Cleveland 24, Dallas 21
Sept. 1, 1991 (at Cleveland): Dallas 26, Cleveland 14
Dec. 10, 1994 (at Dallas): Cleveland 19, Dallas 14
Sept. 19, 2004 (at Dallas): Dallas 19, Dallas 12

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #87

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #87

Thirteen players have worn #87 for the Cowboys. This includes seven wide receivers, four tight ends, and two defensive ends.

Ray Alexander, WR, Florida A&M, 1988-89

Statistics: Alexander caught 55 passes for 804 yards and 6 TDs with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Alexander was a standout in the Canadian Football League, but he had only one good year in the NFL. After catching 54 passes for 788 yards in 1988, he was injured for most of the 1989 season and never played again.

Gordon Banks, WR, Stanford, 1985-87

Statistics: Banks caught 35 passes for 220 yards with Dallas.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played three seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Banks was a former USFL standout who was a backup in Dallas.

Nate Borden, DE, Indiana, 1960-61

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: The Cowboys acquired Borden in the 1960 expansion draft from Green Bay. He started for the Cowboys in 1960 and part of 1961 before moving on to Buffalo in 1962.

Billy Davis, WR, Pittsburgh, 1995-98

Statistics: Davis caught 42 passes for 724 yards and three touchdowns with Dallas.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played four seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Davis was a very good special teams player who became a starter in 1998. He was not a bad receiver, but when Dallas acquired Rocket Ismail in 1999, Davis moved on. After two seasons in Baltimore, he was out of the league.

Ron Howard, TE, Seattle, 1974-75

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Howard played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: He was a former basketball player who played special teams in Dallas for two seasons. He played much more when he moved to Seattle in 1976.

Ken-Yon Rambo, WR, Ohio State, 2001-02

Statistics: Rambo caught 17 passes for 239 yards with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: A product of Ohio State, Rambo saw quite a bit of action in 2002. However, that was his final year in the league.

Alfredo Roberts, TE, Miami, Fla., 1991-92

Statistics: Roberts caught 19 passes for 172 yards and a touchdown with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: The former teammate of Michael Irvin played two years in Dallas as a blocking tight end.

Jay Saldi, TE, South Carolina, 1976-82

Statistics: Saldi caught 63 passes for 704 yards and seven touchdowns with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played seven seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Saldi was Billy Joe DuPree’s primary backup from 1976 to 1980. He has some big plays in some important playoff games, including a touchdown catch that was Roger Staubach’s final career touchdown pass.

Zuriel Smith, WR, Hampton, 2003

Statistics: Smith averaged 7.1 yards per punt return and 21.5 yards per kickoff return for the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Smith saw action in 2003 but had trouble making the team after that.

Andy Stynchula, DE, Penn State, 1968

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Stynchula played for the Colts, Redskins, and Giants before joining the Cowboys in 1968. He retired after one year in Dallas.

Billy Truax, TE, Louisiana State, 1971-73

Statistics: Truax caught 19 passes for 281 yards and a touchdown with Dallas.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played three seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: He was one of Roman Gabriel’s favorite targets in Los Angeles, and he backed up Mike Ditka in Dallas. However, injuries slowed him in 1972 and 1973, and he retired after the 1973 season.

Jason Tucker, WR, Texas Christian, 1999-00

Statistics: Tucker caught 36 passes for 565 and two touchdowns with Dallas.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Tucker was a product of nearby TCU, and he made the squad as a free agent after being cut by Cincinnati. He caught a 90-yard touchdown pass from Troy Aikman in the season finale in 1999 in a win over the Giants that gave Dallas a playoff berth.

Dedric Ward, WR, Northern Iowa, 2004

Statistics: Ward caught one pass for five yards with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Ward was another former Jet who joined the Cowboys thanks to Bill Parcells. He saw action in only eight games and played mostly on special teams.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #87.

Greatest #87

  • Jay Saldi (82%, 77 Votes)
  • Alfredo Roberts (4%, 4 Votes)
  • Jason Tucker (3%, 3 Votes)
  • Ray Alexander (3%, 3 Votes)
  • Billy Davis (2%, 2 Votes)
  • Gordon Banks (2%, 2 Votes)
  • Zuriel Smith (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Billy Truax (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Dedric Ward (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Ron Howard (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Ken-Yon Rambo (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Nate Borden (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Andy Stynchula (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 94

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My Vote: Saldi

Jay SaldiSaldi had several big plays, including a fumble recovery against Minnesota in the 1977 NFL Championship Game, the touchdown reception against Los Angeles in the 1979 playoffs, and a huge 37-yard reception against the Rams in the 1980 playoffs. Thanks to those and his longevity, he gets my vote.

Saldi’s son, John, tried out for the Cowboys in 2006 and 2007, but John failed to make the team.

Cowboys Announce 53-Man Roster

The Cowboys announced their 53-man roster this afternoon. One mild surprise is that the team only kept five wide receivers, releasing Danny Amendola and Mike Jefferson. This means that Dallas has only two healthy receivers at the moment. You can also bet that Hard Knocks will feature plenty of close-ups of Keon Lattimore and Todd Lowber (here’s to hoping that they are signed to the practice squad).

Thanks to the Dallas Morning News, here is the roster:

QB (2) – Tony Romo, Brad Johnson

RB (4) – Marion Barber, Felix Jones, Tashard Choice, Deon Anderson

WR (5) – Terrell Owens, Patrick Crayton, Sam Hurd, Miles Austin, Isaiah Stanback

TE (3) – Jason Witten, Martellus Bennett, Tony Curtis

OL (11) – LT Flozell Adams, LG Kyle Kosier, C Andre Gurode, RG Leonard Davis, RT Marc Colombo, G Montrae Holland, T Pat McQuistan, G Joe Berger, C Cory Procter, OG James Marten, OT Doug Free

DL (6) – Chris Canty, Jay Ratliff, Marcus Spears, Tank Johnson, Jason Hatcher, Stephen Bowen

LB (8) – Greg Ellis, Bradie James, Zach Thomas, DeMarcus Ware, Kevin Burnett, Bobby Carpenter, Anthony Spencer, Justin Rogers

DB (11) – CB Terence Newman, CB Anthony Henry, S Roy Williams, S Ken Hamlin, CB Adam Jones, CB Mike Jenkins, CB Orlando Scandrick, S Pat Watkins, S Courtney Brown, CB Alan Ball, CB Evan Oglesby

Sp (3) – P Mat McBriar, K Nick Folk, LS L.P. Ladouceur

Players who were cut include the following:

Danny Amendola
Drew Atchison
Remi Ayodele
Richard Bartel
Mark Bradford
Alonzo Coleman
Julius Crosslin
Dowayne Davis
Marcus Dixon
Tearrius George
Ryan Gibbons
Rodney Hannah
Mike Jefferson
Keon Lattimore
Todd Lowber
Darrell Robertson
Junior Siavii
Marcus Smith
Tyson Smith
Erik Walden
Cory Lekkerkerker (injury settlement)

In addition, Larry Allen was placed on the reserve/retired list after formally signing with the team this week to retire.

2008 Cowboys-Related Odds

A benefit, I suppose, for having several online betting services as a sponsor is that I receive information about oddsmaking related to the Cowboys. Thanks to Bodog, below are as many odds as you will probably need for the Cowboys… at least for now.

Odds to win the 2009 Super Bowl XLIII
Dallas Cowboys 6/1

Odds to win the 2008 NFC Championship
Dallas Cowboys 9/5

Odds to win the NFC East Division
Dallas Cowboys 4/5

Win Totals
Dallas Cowboys Regular Season Wins
Over 10.5 -135
Under 10.5 +105

Dallas Cowboys Regular Season Home Wins
Over 6 -130
Under 6 Even

Dallas Cowboys Regular Season Away Wins
Over 4.5 -140
Under 4.5 +110

Miscellaneous Odds
Will Wade Phillips be the head coach of the Dallas Cowboys for week 1 of the 2009 NFL season?
Yes -115
No -115

Player Performance Odds

Tony Romo Passing Yards
Over/Under 4000

Tony Romo Passing Touchdowns
Over/Under 30.5

Marion Barber Rushing Yards
Over/Under 1150

Marion Barber Total Touchdowns
Over/Under 12.5

Felix Jones Rushing Yards
Over/Under 460

Felix Jones Total Touchdowns
Over/Under 4

Terrell Owens Receiving Yards
Over/Under 1220

Terrell Owens Touchdowns
Over/Under 13

Terrell Owens Receptions
Over/Under 85

Patrick Crayton Receiving Yards
Over/Under 760

Patrick Crayton Touchdowns
Over/Under 6.5

Jason Witten Receiving Yards
Over/Under 1000

Jason Witten Touchdowns
Over/Under 6.5

Jason Witten Receptions
Over/Under 85

DeMarcus Ware Sacks
Over/Under 12.5

Greg Ellis Sacks
Over/Under 8

Adam Jones Interceptions
Over 3 Even
Under 3 -130

Outstanding Promo Video (Now the Preseason Is Over)

Now that preseason is officially over, here is an outstanding promo video put together by silverandblue:

The only real significant story in the Cowboys’ 16-10 win over Minnesota last evening was that Sam Hurd injured his ankle. This is from the team’s official site:

The looming task of finalizing the 53-man roster just got a little tougher for Cowboys head coach Wade Phillips thanks to a “downer” in Thursday night’s preseason finale.

The Cowboys edged Minnesota, 16-10, on a night reserved largely for the reserves at Texas Stadium. Twenty-eight players sat, including all but one projected starter (fullback Deon Anderson), enabling the coaching staff to evaluate nearly every fringe player on the roster before Saturday’s cuts.

But now Phillips must decide how to replenish a near-barren receiving corps further hindered by the loss of third-year veteran Sam Hurd, who suffered an apparent high ankle sprain on a 35-yard reverse play in the first quarter and left the stadium in a protective boot.

“That’s a real concern, certainly,” Phillips said. “We were only going to play him for a series and he made a big play. That was the downer of the game.”

Hurd, who will have an MRI exam on Friday, seemed confident he could return in time for the Sept. 7 season opener in Cleveland with proper rest and treatment. But team doctors project that he’ll be doubtful for the game due to the lingering nature of a high ankle sprain, which involves the ligaments connecting the tibia and fibia on the lower leg. Generally that type of injury requires a week of evaluation before an accurate timetable can be set.

On the flip side of this story, the real pleasant surprise last night was the play of Tearrius George, who had two sacks and some other pressures in the second half of the game.

Linebacker Tyson Smith also had a good game, recording an interception and five total tackles.

The Hall of Fame Case of Bob Hayes, Revisited

The Seniors Committee of the Pro Football Hall of Fame has, for a second time, nominated Bob Hayes for the Hall of Fame. He is one of several players that Cowboys fans have argued for years should be inducted. In fact, the video below produced for NFL Network puts Hayes among the ten deserving players who have not been inducted.

Here is more from the press release issued today:

Wide receiver Bob Hayes and defensive end Claude Humphrey have been selected by the Pro Football Hall of Fame’s Seniors Committee as finalists for election into the Hall of Fame with the Class of 2009.

Hayes and Humphrey will join 15 still-to-be-named modern-era candidates on the list of finalists from which the Class of 2009 will be selected. The Hall of Fame selection meeting will be held on January 31, 2009, the day before Super Bowl XLIII in Tampa, Florida. To be elected, Hayes and Humphrey must each receive the same 80 percent voting support that is required of all finalists. The Hall’s Board of Selectors can elect a maximum of two senior candidates and five modern-era candidates for a class no smaller than four or larger than seven during next January’s meeting.

Both of the senior nominees have been finalists for the Pro Football Hall of Fame in the past. Hayes was the seniors committee’s candidate in 2004 while Humphrey was a modern-era finalist three times (2003, 2005 and 2006).

Hayes, who earned the label “World’s Fastest Human” during his gold medal-winning performances in track during the 1964 Summer Olympics, took the NFL by storm upon joining the Dallas Cowboys a year later. As a rookie, Hayes led the NFL in 1965 with a 21.8 yards per catch average and scored a league-best 12 touchdown receptions. He recorded 1,000-yard seasons in both of his first two years in the NFL.

A three-time All-NFL pick, Hayes amassed 371 career receptions for 7,414 yards and 71 touchdowns during his 11-season career with the Cowboys (1965-1974) and the San Francisco 49ers (1975). He also returned 104 punts for 1,158 yards and three touchdowns; and had 23 kickoff returns for 581 yards.

Hayes, who passed away on September 18, 2002, played in six NFL/NFC championship games and started in two Super Bowls.

Of 26 players in the Hall of Fame who played (or are listed as) wide receiver, flanker, or end, nine were contemporaries of Hayes. These include the following players, listed with their years of service and their career stats:

Charlie Joiner (1969-1986): 750 rec., 12146 yards, 16.2 ave., 65 TDs
Fred Biletnikoff (1965-1978): 589 rec., 8974 yards, 15.2 ave., 76 TDs
Charley Taylor (1964-1977): 649 rec., 9110 yards, 14.0 ave., 79 TDs
Paul Warfield (1964-1977): 427 rec., 8565 yards, 20.1 ave., 85 TDs
Tommy McDonald (1957-1968): 495 rec., 8410 yards, 17.0 ave., 84 TDs
Bobby Mitchell (1958-1968): 521 rec., 7954 yards, 15.3 ave., 65 TDs
Lance Alworth (1962-1972): 542 rec., 10266 yards, 18.9 ave., 85 TDs
Don Maynard (1958-1973): 633 rec., 11834 yards, 18.7 ave., 88 TDs
Raymond Berry (1955-1967): 631 rec., 9275 yards, 14.7 ave., 68 TDs

Here are Hayes’ numbers:

1965-1975: 371 rec., 7414 yards, 20.0 ave., 71 TDs.

As this list shows, only one of the current Hall of Famers can match Hayes’ career average-per-catch total of 20.0 (Paul Warfield). Moreover, though most have more total touchdowns that Hayes, only Warfield (19.9%) caught a higher percentage of touchdowns based on their receptions. In Hayes’ case, he 19.1% of his receptions were touchdowns.

If Hayes falls noticeably short, it is due to his career totals in receptions and yards. However, his numbers are considerably better than a recent inductee in Lynn Swann, who finished with 336 receptions, 5462 yards, and 51 TDs. And similar to Swann, the best reason for Hayes’ induction is based on more than numbers. It is instead based on how he changed the game thanks to his speed and playmaking ability.

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #86

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #86

Fifteen players have worn #86 for the Cowboys. This includes nine wide receivers, three tight ends, a linebacker, a punter, and a defensive end.

Eric Bjornson, TE, Washington, 1995-99

Statistics: Bjornson caught 127 passes for 1232 yards and 4 TDs with Dallas.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played five seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Dallas hoped that Bjornson could step into the role vacated by Jay Novacek, but Bjornson had neither the hands nor the instincts that Novacek had.

Dan Campbell, TE, Texas A&M, 2003-05

Statistics: Campbell caught 25 passes for 235 yards and 2 TDs with Dallas.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played three seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Campbell was known for his leadership and blocking ability. He was injured for most of the 2005 season and then left via free agency after that season.

Ralph Coleman, LB, North Carolina A&T, 1972

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Coleman was an eighth-round pick in 1972 who saw almost no action with the Cowboys.

James Dixon, WR/RB, Houston, 1989-91

Statistics: Dixon averaged 22.9 yards per kickoff return with Dallas. He also caught 26 passes for 503 yards and 2 TDs.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played three seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Dixon saw quite a bit of action as a kick returner and third receiver in 1989, but his playing time decreased rapidly as the team brought in more talent. He was out of the league after 1991.

Kenny Duckett, WR, Wake Forest, 1985

Statistics: Duckett averaged 19.2 yards on nine kickoff returns.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played less than a full season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Dallas signed Duckett at the end of the 1985 season. He returned a few kickoffs but was out of the league after that season.

Duriel Harris, WR, New Mexico State, 1984

Statistics: Harris caught one pass for nine yards with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None with Dallas.

Longevity: He played less than one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Harris had been a good receiver with the Dolphins, and the Cowboys picked him up off of waivers from Cleveland in 1984. He did next to nothing with the Cowboys.

Bill Houston, WR, Jackson State, 1974

Statistics: Houston caugth six passes for 72 yards with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Houston made the team as a free agent in 1974, but he saw limited action.

Butch Johnson, WR, Calf.-Riverside, 1976-83

Statistics: Johnson caught 132 passes for 2124 yards and 19 TDs with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played eight seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Johnson was a dependable third receiver for the Cowboys but is better known for his outrageous personality. He invented the famous (or infamous, perhaps) California Quake, and he caught one of the most famous passes in team history in Super Bowl XII.

Mike Lucky, TE, Arizona, 1999, 2001-02

Statistics: Lucky caught 19 passes for 141 yards and a touchdown with Dallas.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played three seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Lucky was primarily a blocking tight end who saw action in goalline situations.

Garry Porterfield, DE, Tulsa, 1965

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played less than a full season with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Porterfield looked great in the 1965 preseason but did next to nothing once the regular season began. He was released midway through the 1965 season.

Dave Sherer, P, Southern Methodist, 1960

Statistics: Sherer averaged 42.5 yards per punt with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Baltimore took Sherer with its second pick in the 1959 draft, and Dallas acquired him in the 1960 expansion draft. Dallas let him go in 1961 because the team wanted a kicker who could handle both kicking and punting duties.

Mike Sherrard, WR, UCLA, 1986

Statistics: Sherrard caught 41 passes for 744 yards and 5 TDs with Dallas.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He saw action during only one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: If anyone needed proof that luck was not on the Cowboys’ side during the 1980s, Sherrard provided that proof. After showing great promise during his rookie season, he suffered a series of leg injuries that caused him to miss the 1987 and 1988 seasons. He was cut and signed with San Francisco. Although never a standout player, he had a lengthy career with the 49ers, Giants, and Broncos.

Waddell Smith, WR, Kansas, 1984

Statistics: Smith caught one pass for seven yards with Dallas.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: He made the team as a free agent and played mostly on special teams.

Isaiah Stanback, WR, Washington, 2007-present

Statistics: Stanback averaged 26.0 yards on three kickoff returns in 2007.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He will enter his second season in 2008.

Intangibles: Like Eric Bjornson, Stanback played quarterback at Washington before being drafted by Dallas and converted to another position. Stanback has shown progress as a receiver, but injuries may set him back early this season.

Tyrone Williams, WR, Western Ontario, 1993

Statistics: Williams caught one pass for 25 yards with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Not to be confused with the Tyrone Williams who played defensive back in 2004 (and who wore #37), this Tyrone Williams was a reserve receiver who caught one big 25-yard pass in a 38-3 win over Washington in 1993.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #86.

Greatest #86

  • Butch Johnson (91%, 167 Votes)
  • Dan Campbell (3%, 6 Votes)
  • Eric Bjornson (3%, 5 Votes)
  • Mike Sherrard (1%, 2 Votes)
  • Garry Porterfield (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Kenny Duckett (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Isaiah Stanback (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Bill Houston (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Waddell Smith (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Dave Sherer (0%, 0 Votes)
  • James Dixon (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Mike Lucky (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Ralph Coleman (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Duriel Harris (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Tyrone Williams (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 184

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My Vote: Johnson

Butch JohnsonJohnson was one of the most memorable players in team history. Nobody can forget the sight of him laying out to catch Roger Staubach’s pass in Super Bowl XII, barely hanging on with his fingertips and then rolling into the end zone (whether it should have been a legal reception really doesn’t matter . . . ). And his California Quake ranks with Billy “White Shoes” Johnson’s dance as one of the most famous individual celebrations in league history.

Bjornson was not a bust, but he could not live up to the expectation that he could replace Novacek. The others were role players, backups, and/or simply not with the team long enough to accomplish anything close to what Johnson did in Dallas.