Greatest Players by Number

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This series reviews every player in the history of the Dallas Cowboys, organized by their jersey numbers.

 

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #62

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #62

Eleven players have worn #62 for the Cowboys. This includes ten offensive linemen and a kicker.

Brian Baldinger, OL, Duke, 1982-84,1986-87

Brian Baldringer, Dallas CowboysStatistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played a total of five seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Baldinger started at every offensive line position with the Cowboys, but he was injured frequently. He is now a commentator for Fox.

Bob Brotzki, T, Syracuse, 1988

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played less than a full season with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Brotzki was signed midway through the 1988 season after he was released by the Colts. He did not play again following that season.

Andy Cvercko, G, Northwestern, 1961-62

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Cvercko played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Dallas acquired Cvercko from Green Bay prior to the 1961 season, and he started much of the season. Two years later, he was off to Cleveland.

Leon Donohue, G, Cal. State San Jose, 1965-67

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Donohue played three seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Donohue started at right guard in 1966 and 1967. He retired in 1968 due to knee problems.

John Fitzgerald, C, Boston College, 1971-80

John Fitzgerald, Dallas CowboysStatistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Fitzgerald played ten seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: He took over as the starting center for Dave Manders, and he played in Super Bowl X, XII, and XIII. He was known as having a great sense of humor and was a hard worker. He had to retire after the 1980 season due to injuries.

Al Johnson, C, Wisconsin, 2003-05

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played three seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Johnson was a second round pick in 2003 who developed into the starting center by 2004. He battled for the starting job with Andre Gurode, and the latter finally won the position for good in 2006. Johnson started last year for Arizona.

Tom Myslinski, G/C, Tennessee, 1999

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Dallas was Myslinki’s seventh team in eight seasons when he joined the Cowboys in 1999. He started a couple of games in relief but was gone after one year.

Paul Oswald, G, Kansas, 1988

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played less than a full season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Oswald saw action in one game for the Cowboys before he was released in 1988.

Craig Page, C, Georgia Tech, 2000

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played less than a full season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Page played in a couple of games in 2000.

Lance Poimboeuf, K, Southwest Louisiana, 1963

Statistics: He is credited for having dressed for one game in 1963, but he has no stats.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played in one game for Dallas.

Intangibles: Poimboeuf was Sam Baker’s backup in 1963.

Mike Zentic, C, Oklahoma State, 1987

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Replacement player.

Intangibles: He was the starting center during the scab games of 1987.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #62.

Greatest #62

  • John Fitzgerald (93%, 91 Votes)
  • Brian Baldinger (4%, 4 Votes)
  • Al Johnson (2%, 2 Votes)
  • Craig Page (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Lance Poimboeuf (0%, 0 Votes)
  • James Parrish (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Paul Oswald (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Tom Myslinski (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Leon Donohue (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Andy Cvercko (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Bob Brotzki (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Mike Zentic (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 98

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My Vote: Fitzgerald

John Fitzgerald, Dallas CowboysFitzgerald was a quality center for the good part of a decade, and he deserves this due to his longevity. It was thanks to Fitzgerald’s ability to deep snap that the Cowboys were able to install the shotgun in 1975.

Of the others, Baldinger is pretty well-known as an announcer but was never a regular starter for the Cowboys. And though Johnson started for the Cowboys, he was not worth a second round pick that the Cowboys used to get him in 2003. The person who deserves more mention than either Baldringer or Johnson is Donahue, who started both of the championship games in 1966 and 1967.

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #62

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #62

Eleven players have worn #62 for the Cowboys. This includes ten offensive linemen and a kicker.

Brian Baldinger, OL, Duke, 1982-84,1986-87

Brian Baldringer, Dallas CowboysStatistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played a total of five seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Baldinger started at every offensive line position with the Cowboys, but he was injured frequently. He is now a commentator for Fox.

Bob Brotzki, T, Syracuse, 1988

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played less than a full season with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Brotzki was signed midway through the 1988 season after he was released by the Colts. He did not play again following that season.

Andy Cvercko, G, Northwestern, 1961-62

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Cvercko played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Dallas acquired Cvercko from Green Bay prior to the 1961 season, and he started much of the season. Two years later, he was off to Cleveland.

Leon Donohue, G, Cal. State San Jose, 1965-67

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Donohue played three seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Donohue started at right guard in 1966 and 1967. He retired in 1968 due to knee problems.

John Fitzgerald, C, Boston College, 1971-80

John Fitzgerald, Dallas CowboysStatistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Fitzgerald played ten seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: He took over as the starting center for Dave Manders, and he played in Super Bowl X, XII, and XIII. He was known as having a great sense of humor and was a hard worker. He had to retire after the 1980 season due to injuries.

Al Johnson, C, Wisconsin, 2003-05

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played three seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Johnson was a second round pick in 2003 who developed into the starting center by 2004. He battled for the starting job with Andre Gurode, and the latter finally won the position for good in 2006. Johnson started last year for Arizona.

Tom Myslinski, G/C, Tennessee, 1999

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Dallas was Myslinki’s seventh team in eight seasons when he joined the Cowboys in 1999. He started a couple of games in relief but was gone after one year.

Paul Oswald, G, Kansas, 1988

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played less than a full season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Oswald saw action in one game for the Cowboys before he was released in 1988.

Craig Page, C, Georgia Tech, 2000

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played less than a full season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Page played in a couple of games in 2000.

Lance Poimboeuf, K, Southwest Louisiana, 1963

Statistics: He is credited for having dressed for one game in 1963, but he has no stats.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played in one game for Dallas.

Intangibles: Poimboeuf was Sam Baker’s backup in 1963.

Mike Zentic, C, Oklahoma State, 1987

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Replacement player.

Intangibles: He was the starting center during the scab games of 1987.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #62.

Greatest #62

  • John Fitzgerald (93%, 91 Votes)
  • Brian Baldinger (4%, 4 Votes)
  • Al Johnson (2%, 2 Votes)
  • Craig Page (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Lance Poimboeuf (0%, 0 Votes)
  • James Parrish (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Paul Oswald (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Tom Myslinski (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Leon Donohue (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Andy Cvercko (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Bob Brotzki (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Mike Zentic (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 98

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My Vote: Fitzgerald

John Fitzgerald, Dallas CowboysFitzgerald was a quality center for the good part of a decade, and he deserves this due to his longevity. It was thanks to Fitzgerald’s ability to deep snap that the Cowboys were able to install the shotgun in 1975.

Of the others, Baldinger is pretty well-known as an announcer but was never a regular starter for the Cowboys. And though Johnson started for the Cowboys, he was not worth a second round pick that the Cowboys used to get him in 2003. The person who deserves more mention than either Baldringer or Johnson is Donahue, who started both of the championship games in 1966 and 1967.

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #61

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #61

Six players have worn #61 for the Cowboys. This includes five offensive linemen and a punter/kicker.

Jim Cooper, OL, Temple, 1977-86

Jim CooperStatistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Cooper played ten seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: He was a dependable right tackle throughout a large part of the 1980s.

Kelvin Garmon, G, Baylor, 2001-02

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He was originally drafted in 1999 but only played in two seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Garmon spent two seasons on injured reserve but came back to become a starter in 2001. He was traded to San Diego early in the 2002 season.

Allen Green, P/K, Mississippi, 1961

Statistics: Green made five of 15 field goal attempts (yes, you read that correctly) with the Cowboys. As a punter, he averaged 36.7 yards per kick.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season.

Intangibles: When a kicker hits on 33.3% of his field goals, he won’t last long in the NFL. Green didn’t.

Nate Newton, G/T, Florida A&M, 1986-98

Nate NewtonStatistics: n/a

Accolades: Newton made six Pro Bowls and was named first-team All-Pro twice. He was named to numerous other all-pro and all-conference teams.

Longevity: He played 13 seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Newton was a mainstay during the 1990s, first earning widespread recognition thanks to John Madden showing how far Newton’s sweat showed up on his pants. He was also the most likable of all the Cowboys who ran afoul with the law. Since serving 30+ months in prison for smuggling marijuana, he has turned his life around.

Blaine Nye, G, Stanford, 1968-76

Blaine NyeStatistics: n/a

Accolades: Nye was named to two Pro Bowls.

Longevity: He played nine seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Nye was a defensive lineman in college who was converted to offensive line by the Cowboys. He developed into a starter by 1970. He was a solid player with the team (and perhaps its smartest, given that he has a master’s degree in physics). He was notorious for contemplating retirement before changing his mind right before training camp. Didn’t quite get the media coverage of a certain Green Bay quarterback lately.

Duane Putnam, G, Pacific, 1960

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None with Dallas. He was a five-time Pro Bowler with the L.A. Rams during the 1950s.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Dallas acquired Putnam in the 1960 expansion draft. He started one season with the Cowboys before the team traded him to Cleveland.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #61.

Greatest #61

  • Nate Newton (88%, 114 Votes)
  • Blaine Nye (11%, 14 Votes)
  • Jim Cooper (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Kelvin Garmon (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Allen Green (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Duane Putnam (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 130

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My Vote: Newton

Nate NewtonVery few Cowboys lasted as long as Newton, who remained solid throughout most of the 1990s. He was originally signed by Washington but was released during training camp. He then played two seasons in the USFL before joining the Cowboys in 1986, and what a ride it was. He was versatile enough to move from guard to tackle, then back to guard. He was also a vocal leader in the locker room. He’s paid his debt for the prison term, and I don’t think it has hurt his overall standing as one of the Cowboy greats.

Nye was another great one who came along at the best of times, as he appeared in three Super Bowls. I don’t think that he meant quite as much to the team as Newton, however. Cooper was among the better lineman of the 1980s (some tend to forget all of these linemen thanks to Phil Pozderac), but he simply wasn’t in the same class as Newton or Nye.

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #61

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #61

Six players have worn #61 for the Cowboys. This includes five offensive linemen and a punter/kicker.

Jim Cooper, OL, Temple, 1977-86

Jim CooperStatistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Cooper played ten seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: He was a dependable right tackle throughout a large part of the 1980s.

Kelvin Garmon, G, Baylor, 2001-02

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He was originally drafted in 1999 but only played in two seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Garmon spent two seasons on injured reserve but came back to become a starter in 2001. He was traded to San Diego early in the 2002 season.

Allen Green, P/K, Mississippi, 1961

Statistics: Green made five of 15 field goal attempts (yes, you read that correctly) with the Cowboys. As a punter, he averaged 36.7 yards per kick.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season.

Intangibles: When a kicker hits on 33.3% of his field goals, he won’t last long in the NFL. Green didn’t.

Nate Newton, G/T, Florida A&M, 1986-98

Nate NewtonStatistics: n/a

Accolades: Newton made six Pro Bowls and was named first-team All-Pro twice. He was named to numerous other all-pro and all-conference teams.

Longevity: He played 13 seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Newton was a mainstay during the 1990s, first earning widespread recognition thanks to John Madden showing how far Newton’s sweat showed up on his pants. He was also the most likable of all the Cowboys who ran afoul with the law. Since serving 30+ months in prison for smuggling marijuana, he has turned his life around.

Blaine Nye, G, Stanford, 1968-76

Blaine NyeStatistics: n/a

Accolades: Nye was named to two Pro Bowls.

Longevity: He played nine seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Nye was a defensive lineman in college who was converted to offensive line by the Cowboys. He developed into a starter by 1970. He was a solid player with the team (and perhaps its smartest, given that he has a master’s degree in physics). He was notorious for contemplating retirement before changing his mind right before training camp. Didn’t quite get the media coverage of a certain Green Bay quarterback lately.

Duane Putnam, G, Pacific, 1960

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None with Dallas. He was a five-time Pro Bowler with the L.A. Rams during the 1950s.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Dallas acquired Putnam in the 1960 expansion draft. He started one season with the Cowboys before the team traded him to Cleveland.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #61.

Greatest #61

  • Nate Newton (88%, 114 Votes)
  • Blaine Nye (11%, 14 Votes)
  • Jim Cooper (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Kelvin Garmon (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Allen Green (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Duane Putnam (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 130

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My Vote: Newton

Nate NewtonVery few Cowboys lasted as long as Newton, who remained solid throughout most of the 1990s. He was originally signed by Washington but was released during training camp. He then played two seasons in the USFL before joining the Cowboys in 1986, and what a ride it was. He was versatile enough to move from guard to tackle, then back to guard. He was also a vocal leader in the locker room. He’s paid his debt for the prison term, and I don’t think it has hurt his overall standing as one of the Cowboy greats.

Nye was another great one who came along at the best of times, as he appeared in three Super Bowls. I don’t think that he meant quite as much to the team as Newton, however. Cooper was among the better lineman of the 1980s (some tend to forget all of these linemen thanks to Phil Pozderac), but he simply wasn’t in the same class as Newton or Nye.

Recap: Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers, Nos. 1-60

dallas_logo.gifWe are still on pace to finish the Greatest Players by Number Series by the end of training camp. Many thanks to all of those who have voted thus far.

Below is a summary of the voting to date. This does not include the polls being run on Cowboys Pride and Dallas Cowboy Fans United, though I do check out the results on those sites and would like to go back and add the totals from those sites here.

#

Total

Votes

Players Name Pos. Years
1 212 5 Mat McBriar (60%) P 2004-present
2 87 3 Lin Elliott (64%) K 1992-1993
3 113 5 Billy Cundiff (28%) K 2002-2005
4 110 6 Mike Saxon (76%) P 1985-1992
5 85 2 Clint Stoerner (80%) QB 2000-2002
6 114 3 Nick Folk (92%) K 2007-present
7 195 6 Steve Beuerlein (69%) QB 1991-1992
8 145 2 Troy Aikman (92%) QB 1989-2000
9 178 4 Tony Romo (98%) QB 2003-present
10 108 8 Ron Widby (76%) P 1968-1971
11 231 9 Danny White (96%) QB/P 1976-1988
12 195 2 Roger Staubach (96%) QB 1969-1979
13 133 2 Jerry Rhome (86%) QB 1965-1968
14 176 5 Craig Morton (74%) QB 1965-1974
15 141 4 Toni Fritsch (77%) K 1971-1973, 1975
16 140 4 Vinny Testaverde (65%) QB 2004
17 199 5 Don Meredith (88%) QB 1960-1968
18 134 7 Chris Boniol (64%) K 1994-1996
19 180 8 Lance Rentzel (36%) WR 1967-1970
20 190 11 Mel Renfro (88%) DB 1964-1977
21 242 10 Deion Sanders (96%) DB 1995-1999
22 230 7 Emmitt Smith (90%) RB 1990-2002
23 76 12 Robert Williams (36%) DB 1987-1993
24 106 10 Everson Walls (81%) DB 1981-1989
25 79 15 Pat Watkins (35%) DB 2006-present
26 181 10 Kevin Smith (30%) DB 1992-1999
27 163 12 Ron Fellows (39%) DB 1981-1986
28 214 5 Darren Woodson (100%) DB 1992-2003
29 198 10 Kenneth Gant (61%) DB 1990-1994
30 111 10 Dan Reeves (77%) RB 1965-1972
31 178 12 Roy Williams (64%) S 2002-present
32 154 10 Walt Garrison (65%) RB 1966-1974
33 182 11 Tony Dorsett (95%) RB 1977-1987
34 184 10 Herschel Walker (56%) RB 1986-89, 1996-97
35 152 12 Calvin Hill (90%) RB 1969-1974
36 72 9 Vince Albritton (44%) S 1984-1991
37 105 9 James Washington (93%) S 1990-1994
38 72 7 Sam Baker (46%) P/K 1962-1963
39 60 6 Lousaka Polite (57%) RB 2004-2006
40 178 6 Bill Bates (99%) S 1983-1997
41 209 8 Charlie Waters (78%) DB 1970-78, 1980-81
42 122 13 Anthony Henry (66%) CB 2005-present
43 133 5 Cliff Harris (77%) S 1970-1979
44 121 7 Robert Newhouse (95%) FB 1972-1983
45 62 8 Manny Hendrix (55%) DB 1986-1991
46 113 9 Mark Washington (67%) CB 1970-1978
47 111 6 Dexter Clinkscale (68%) S 1980-1985
48 95 3 Daryl Johnston (99%) FB 1989-1999
49 45 2 Brett Pierce (56%) TE 2004-2005
*49 n/a 1 Tom Landry Coach 1960-1988
50 113 11 D.D. Lewis (78%) LB 1968, 1970-81
51 125 11 Ken Norton (81%) LB 1988-1993
52 162 11 Dexter Coakley (78%) LB 1997-2004
53 104 12 Mark Stepnoski (60%) C 1989-94, 1999-01
54 136 9 Randy White (91%) DT 1975-1988
55 119 12 Lee Roy Jordan (87%) LB 1963-1976
56 91 13 Eugene Lockhart (42%) LB 1984-1990
57 80 13 Kevin Burnett (64%) LB 2005-present
58 69 9 Mike Hegman (63%) LB 1976-1987
59 48 9 Dat Nguyen (88%) LB 1999-2005
60 20 14 Derek Kennard (80%) C/G 1994-1996

* * *

While we are on the subject of voting, I had to throw this in here:

Recap: Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers, Nos. 1-60

dallas_logo.gifWe are still on pace to finish the Greatest Players by Number Series by the end of training camp. Many thanks to all of those who have voted thus far.

Below is a summary of the voting to date. This does not include the polls being run on Cowboys Pride and Dallas Cowboy Fans United, though I do check out the results on those sites and would like to go back and add the totals from those sites here.

#

Total

Votes

Players Name Pos. Years
1 212 5 Mat McBriar (60%) P 2004-present
2 87 3 Lin Elliott (64%) K 1992-1993
3 113 5 Billy Cundiff (28%) K 2002-2005
4 110 6 Mike Saxon (76%) P 1985-1992
5 85 2 Clint Stoerner (80%) QB 2000-2002
6 114 3 Nick Folk (92%) K 2007-present
7 195 6 Steve Beuerlein (69%) QB 1991-1992
8 145 2 Troy Aikman (92%) QB 1989-2000
9 178 4 Tony Romo (98%) QB 2003-present
10 108 8 Ron Widby (76%) P 1968-1971
11 231 9 Danny White (96%) QB/P 1976-1988
12 195 2 Roger Staubach (96%) QB 1969-1979
13 133 2 Jerry Rhome (86%) QB 1965-1968
14 176 5 Craig Morton (74%) QB 1965-1974
15 141 4 Toni Fritsch (77%) K 1971-1973, 1975
16 140 4 Vinny Testaverde (65%) QB 2004
17 199 5 Don Meredith (88%) QB 1960-1968
18 134 7 Chris Boniol (64%) K 1994-1996
19 180 8 Lance Rentzel (36%) WR 1967-1970
20 190 11 Mel Renfro (88%) DB 1964-1977
21 242 10 Deion Sanders (96%) DB 1995-1999
22 230 7 Emmitt Smith (90%) RB 1990-2002
23 76 12 Robert Williams (36%) DB 1987-1993
24 106 10 Everson Walls (81%) DB 1981-1989
25 79 15 Pat Watkins (35%) DB 2006-present
26 181 10 Kevin Smith (30%) DB 1992-1999
27 163 12 Ron Fellows (39%) DB 1981-1986
28 214 5 Darren Woodson (100%) DB 1992-2003
29 198 10 Kenneth Gant (61%) DB 1990-1994
30 111 10 Dan Reeves (77%) RB 1965-1972
31 178 12 Roy Williams (64%) S 2002-present
32 154 10 Walt Garrison (65%) RB 1966-1974
33 182 11 Tony Dorsett (95%) RB 1977-1987
34 184 10 Herschel Walker (56%) RB 1986-89, 1996-97
35 152 12 Calvin Hill (90%) RB 1969-1974
36 72 9 Vince Albritton (44%) S 1984-1991
37 105 9 James Washington (93%) S 1990-1994
38 72 7 Sam Baker (46%) P/K 1962-1963
39 60 6 Lousaka Polite (57%) RB 2004-2006
40 178 6 Bill Bates (99%) S 1983-1997
41 209 8 Charlie Waters (78%) DB 1970-78, 1980-81
42 122 13 Anthony Henry (66%) CB 2005-present
43 133 5 Cliff Harris (77%) S 1970-1979
44 121 7 Robert Newhouse (95%) FB 1972-1983
45 62 8 Manny Hendrix (55%) DB 1986-1991
46 113 9 Mark Washington (67%) CB 1970-1978
47 111 6 Dexter Clinkscale (68%) S 1980-1985
48 95 3 Daryl Johnston (99%) FB 1989-1999
49 45 2 Brett Pierce (56%) TE 2004-2005
*49 n/a 1 Tom Landry Coach 1960-1988
50 113 11 D.D. Lewis (78%) LB 1968, 1970-81
51 125 11 Ken Norton (81%) LB 1988-1993
52 162 11 Dexter Coakley (78%) LB 1997-2004
53 104 12 Mark Stepnoski (60%) C 1989-94, 1999-01
54 136 9 Randy White (91%) DT 1975-1988
55 119 12 Lee Roy Jordan (87%) LB 1963-1976
56 91 13 Eugene Lockhart (42%) LB 1984-1990
57 80 13 Kevin Burnett (64%) LB 2005-present
58 69 9 Mike Hegman (63%) LB 1976-1987
59 48 9 Dat Nguyen (88%) LB 1999-2005
60 20 14 Derek Kennard (80%) C/G 1994-1996

* * *

While we are on the subject of voting, I had to throw this in here:

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #60

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #60

Twelve players have worn #60 for the Cowboys. This includes three linebackers, six offensive linemen, and three defensive linemen.

Jackie Burkett, LB, Auburn, 1968-69

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Burkett played several seasons in Baltimore along with one in New Orleans before joining the Cowboys. He was a backup for two seasons in Dallas.

Lee Roy Caffey, LB, Texas A&M, 1971

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None with Dallas.

Longevity: He played one season with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Caffey was an all-pro with the Packers during the height of the Green Bay dynasty in the 1960s. He was a backup for his one year in Dallas.

Buzz Guy, G, Duke, 1960

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Guy was a backup with the Giants before the Cowboys acquired him in the 1960 expansion draft. He lasted one year before playing in the American Football League.

Dean Hamel, DT, Tulsa, 1989-90

Statistics: Hamel recorded 4.5 sacks with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Hamel was the subject of a rare trade between the Cowboys and Redskins, and he started at defensive tackle for two seasons with the Cowboys.

Joe Bob Isbell, G, Houston, 1962-65

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Isbell played four seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: He was one of Tom Landry’s early messenger guards.

Derek Kennard, G, Nevada-Reno, 1994-96

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played three seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Dallas signed Kennard in 1994 to play right guard. He retired during training camp in 1995 but returned midway through the season. When center Ray Donaldson was injured on Thanksgiving Day, Kennard became the team’s new center. He started throughout the playoffs, including Super Bowl XXX.

Gene Killian, G, Tennessee, 1974

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Killian was a late-round pick in 1974. He was a backup guard for one season in the pros.

Steve Kiner, LB, Tennessee, 1970

Statistics: Kiner had one interception with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Kiner was best known as Duane Thomas’ roommate in 1970. Kiner was traded to New England in 1971 and became a starter there.

John Nix, DT, Southern Miss, 2001-02

Statistics: Nix had 17 tackles and four assists with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Nix was a seventh-round pick in 2001 who never broke into the starting lineup. He was gone after two seasons.

Ben Noll, G, Pennsylvania, 2004-05

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played in parts of two seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Noll made the team as a free agent, but he spent most of his two seasons in Dallas on the inactive list.

Tom Randall, G, Iowa State, 1978

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Randall was originally signed as a defensive lineman but was converted to offensive ine. He was a backup during the 1978 season.

Don Smerek, DL, Nevada-Reno, 1981-87

Statistics: Smerek recorded 14.5 sacks with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Smerek played seven seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: He originally made the team as a free agent in 1980 but was injured that season. In fact, injuries told the story of Smerek, as he was hurt numerous times during his career (including an incident where he was reportedly shot in the chest). He was a capable backup but never managed to work his way into the starting lineup regularly.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #60.

Greatest #60

  • Derek Kennard (60%, 46 Votes)
  • Don Smerek (25%, 19 Votes)
  • Lee Roy Caffey (10%, 8 Votes)
  • Marcus Smith (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Buzz Guy (1%, 1 Votes)
  • John Nix (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Steve Kiner (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Tom Randall (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Ben Noll (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Gene Killian (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Joe Bob Isbell (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Dean Hamel (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Jackie Burkett (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Chris Brymer (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 77

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My Vote: Kennard

Derek KennardThis was another none-of-the-above tough one. My initial thought was to go with Don Smerek due to longevity, but he really never did anything that stood out. Kennard was a starter for an entire season in 1994, and his play at center in replacing Donaldson in 1995 was a huge help to the Cowboys in their last Super Bowl run. In my book (and, um, on my blog, I suppose) that gives Kennard an edge over Smerek. Very few of the others were starters (Hamel is really the only other one), and none did much to stand out during their short tenures in Dallas.

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #60

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #60

Twelve players have worn #60 for the Cowboys. This includes three linebackers, six offensive linemen, and three defensive linemen.

Jackie Burkett, LB, Auburn, 1968-69

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Burkett played several seasons in Baltimore along with one in New Orleans before joining the Cowboys. He was a backup for two seasons in Dallas.

Lee Roy Caffey, LB, Texas A&M, 1971

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None with Dallas.

Longevity: He played one season with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Caffey was an all-pro with the Packers during the height of the Green Bay dynasty in the 1960s. He was a backup for his one year in Dallas.

Buzz Guy, G, Duke, 1960

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Guy was a backup with the Giants before the Cowboys acquired him in the 1960 expansion draft. He lasted one year before playing in the American Football League.

Dean Hamel, DT, Tulsa, 1989-90

Statistics: Hamel recorded 4.5 sacks with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Hamel was the subject of a rare trade between the Cowboys and Redskins, and he started at defensive tackle for two seasons with the Cowboys.

Joe Bob Isbell, G, Houston, 1962-65

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Isbell played four seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: He was one of Tom Landry’s early messenger guards.

Derek Kennard, G, Nevada-Reno, 1994-96

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played three seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Dallas signed Kennard in 1994 to play right guard. He retired during training camp in 1995 but returned midway through the season. When center Ray Donaldson was injured on Thanksgiving Day, Kennard became the team’s new center. He started throughout the playoffs, including Super Bowl XXX.

Gene Killian, G, Tennessee, 1974

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Killian was a late-round pick in 1974. He was a backup guard for one season in the pros.

Steve Kiner, LB, Tennessee, 1970

Statistics: Kiner had one interception with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Kiner was best known as Duane Thomas’ roommate in 1970. Kiner was traded to New England in 1971 and became a starter there.

John Nix, DT, Southern Miss, 2001-02

Statistics: Nix had 17 tackles and four assists with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Nix was a seventh-round pick in 2001 who never broke into the starting lineup. He was gone after two seasons.

Ben Noll, G, Pennsylvania, 2004-05

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played in parts of two seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Noll made the team as a free agent, but he spent most of his two seasons in Dallas on the inactive list.

Tom Randall, G, Iowa State, 1978

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Randall was originally signed as a defensive lineman but was converted to offensive ine. He was a backup during the 1978 season.

Don Smerek, DL, Nevada-Reno, 1981-87

Statistics: Smerek recorded 14.5 sacks with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Smerek played seven seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: He originally made the team as a free agent in 1980 but was injured that season. In fact, injuries told the story of Smerek, as he was hurt numerous times during his career (including an incident where he was reportedly shot in the chest). He was a capable backup but never managed to work his way into the starting lineup regularly.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #60.

Greatest #60

  • Derek Kennard (60%, 46 Votes)
  • Don Smerek (25%, 19 Votes)
  • Lee Roy Caffey (10%, 8 Votes)
  • Marcus Smith (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Buzz Guy (1%, 1 Votes)
  • John Nix (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Steve Kiner (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Tom Randall (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Ben Noll (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Gene Killian (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Joe Bob Isbell (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Dean Hamel (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Jackie Burkett (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Chris Brymer (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 77

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My Vote: Kennard

Derek KennardThis was another none-of-the-above tough one. My initial thought was to go with Don Smerek due to longevity, but he really never did anything that stood out. Kennard was a starter for an entire season in 1994, and his play at center in replacing Donaldson in 1995 was a huge help to the Cowboys in their last Super Bowl run. In my book (and, um, on my blog, I suppose) that gives Kennard an edge over Smerek. Very few of the others were starters (Hamel is really the only other one), and none did much to stand out during their short tenures in Dallas.

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #59

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #59

Nine players, all linebackers, have worn #59 for the Cowboys.

Guy Brown, LB, Houston, 1977-82

Guy Brown, Dallas CowboysStatistics: Brown recorded one interception during his career in Dallas.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played six seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Brown suffered through a number of injuries during his fairly long tenure in Dallas. He was a backup for such players as D.D. Lewis, Mike Hegman, and Anthony Dickerson.

Warren Capone, LB, Louisiana State, 1975

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played less than one full season with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Capone began his pro career in 1975 in the World Football League. He joined the Cowboys when the WFL folded.

Garry Cobb, LB, Southern California, 1988-89

Statistics: Cobb had 7.5 sacks with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Cobb was originally drafted by Dallas in the ninth round of the 1979 draft, but he was released. After a long career with Detroit and Philadelphia, he rejoined the Cowboys in 1988 for two final seasons.

Ken Hutcherson, LB, Livingston State. 1974

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: He was a special teams player in 1974.

Dat Nguyen, LB, Texas A&M, 1999-05

Dat Nguyen, Dallas CowboysStatistics: Nguyen recorded 392 tackles with 111 assists with the Cowboys. He also had seven interceptions and six sacks.

Accolades: He was mentioned as an all-NFC player in a couple of publications.

Longevity: He played six seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Nguyen was an undersized linebacker with great speed and a great nose for the ball. A star at Texas A&M, he instantly became a star when Dallas selected him in the third round of the 1999 draft. He became a full-time starter by 2001 and remained as a starter until an injury curtailed his career in 2005.

Jesse Penn, LB, Virginia Tech, 1985-87

Statistics: Penn recorded 2.5 sacks and one interception with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played three seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles:Penn was a second-round pick in 1985 who turned out to be another big disappointment of the 1980s. He never played to his full potential and was gone after just three seasons.

Darrin Smith, LB, Miami, Fla., 1993-96

Darrin Smith, Dallas CowboysStatistics: Smith recorded 233 tackles and 54 assists, with two interceptions and nine sacks.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played four seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Smith was a fast linebacker from the University of Miami who became an instant starter on the outside as a rookie. He made some big plays during the heyday of the 1990s dynasty and was a huge free agent loss following the 1996 season.

Kirk Timmer, LB, Montana State, 1987

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played in one replacement game in 1987.

Intangibles: Timmer was apparently a big star at Montana State, but his only pro game was against the New York Jets during the strike in 1987.

Mike Walter, LB, Oregon, 1983

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None with Dallas.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Walter was yet another example of player development failures during the 1980s. He was drafted as an outside linebacker in 1983. He did very little with Dallas and was released before the 1984 season. San Francisco signed him and moved him to inside linebacker. Between 1984 and 1993, he started 96 games and appeared in three Super Bowls.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #59.

Greatest #59

  • Dat Nguyen (81%, 92 Votes)
  • Darrin Smith (15%, 17 Votes)
  • Jesse Penn (2%, 2 Votes)
  • Mike Walter (2%, 2 Votes)
  • Warren Capone (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Guy Brown (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Garry Cobb (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Ken Hutcherson (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Kirk Timmer (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 113

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My Vote: Nguyen

Dat Nguyen, Dallas CowboysNguyen falls under a category with Bill Bates in this contest. It really doesn’t matter that Darrin Smith was probably more talented (I think this was so, though others will disagree). Nguyen was the type of player everyone could root for, and even though he never made a Pro Bowl or All-Pro team, some fans wanted the team to consider putting Nguyen in the Ring of Honor after his retirement in 2006. I respectfully disagree, but he at least should win this contest.

Smith had a long career with Philadelphia, Seattle, and New Orleans, but his best years were with the Cowboys. Brown had a surprisingly long career for a backup.

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #59

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #59

Nine players, all linebackers, have worn #59 for the Cowboys.

Guy Brown, LB, Houston, 1977-82

Guy Brown, Dallas CowboysStatistics: Brown recorded one interception during his career in Dallas.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played six seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Brown suffered through a number of injuries during his fairly long tenure in Dallas. He was a backup for such players as D.D. Lewis, Mike Hegman, and Anthony Dickerson.

Warren Capone, LB, Louisiana State, 1975

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played less than one full season with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Capone began his pro career in 1975 in the World Football League. He joined the Cowboys when the WFL folded.

Garry Cobb, LB, Southern California, 1988-89

Statistics: Cobb had 7.5 sacks with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Cobb was originally drafted by Dallas in the ninth round of the 1979 draft, but he was released. After a long career with Detroit and Philadelphia, he rejoined the Cowboys in 1988 for two final seasons.

Ken Hutcherson, LB, Livingston State. 1974

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: He was a special teams player in 1974.

Dat Nguyen, LB, Texas A&M, 1999-05

Dat Nguyen, Dallas CowboysStatistics: Nguyen recorded 392 tackles with 111 assists with the Cowboys. He also had seven interceptions and six sacks.

Accolades: He was mentioned as an all-NFC player in a couple of publications.

Longevity: He played six seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Nguyen was an undersized linebacker with great speed and a great nose for the ball. A star at Texas A&M, he instantly became a star when Dallas selected him in the third round of the 1999 draft. He became a full-time starter by 2001 and remained as a starter until an injury curtailed his career in 2005.

Jesse Penn, LB, Virginia Tech, 1985-87

Statistics: Penn recorded 2.5 sacks and one interception with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played three seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles:Penn was a second-round pick in 1985 who turned out to be another big disappointment of the 1980s. He never played to his full potential and was gone after just three seasons.

Darrin Smith, LB, Miami, Fla., 1993-96

Darrin Smith, Dallas CowboysStatistics: Smith recorded 233 tackles and 54 assists, with two interceptions and nine sacks.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played four seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Smith was a fast linebacker from the University of Miami who became an instant starter on the outside as a rookie. He made some big plays during the heyday of the 1990s dynasty and was a huge free agent loss following the 1996 season.

Kirk Timmer, LB, Montana State, 1987

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played in one replacement game in 1987.

Intangibles: Timmer was apparently a big star at Montana State, but his only pro game was against the New York Jets during the strike in 1987.

Mike Walter, LB, Oregon, 1983

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None with Dallas.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Walter was yet another example of player development failures during the 1980s. He was drafted as an outside linebacker in 1983. He did very little with Dallas and was released before the 1984 season. San Francisco signed him and moved him to inside linebacker. Between 1984 and 1993, he started 96 games and appeared in three Super Bowls.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #59.

Greatest #59

  • Dat Nguyen (81%, 92 Votes)
  • Darrin Smith (15%, 17 Votes)
  • Jesse Penn (2%, 2 Votes)
  • Mike Walter (2%, 2 Votes)
  • Warren Capone (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Guy Brown (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Garry Cobb (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Ken Hutcherson (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Kirk Timmer (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 113

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My Vote: Nguyen

Dat Nguyen, Dallas CowboysNguyen falls under a category with Bill Bates in this contest. It really doesn’t matter that Darrin Smith was probably more talented (I think this was so, though others will disagree). Nguyen was the type of player everyone could root for, and even though he never made a Pro Bowl or All-Pro team, some fans wanted the team to consider putting Nguyen in the Ring of Honor after his retirement in 2006. I respectfully disagree, but he at least should win this contest.

Smith had a long career with Philadelphia, Seattle, and New Orleans, but his best years were with the Cowboys. Brown had a surprisingly long career for a backup.