Greatest Players by Number

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This series reviews every player in the history of the Dallas Cowboys, organized by their jersey numbers.

 

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #76

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #76

Ten players have worn #76 for the Cowboys. This includes seven offensive linemen and three defensive linemen.

Flozell Adams, OT, Michigan State, 1998-

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: He has been named to four Pro Bowls.

Longevity: Adams will enter his eleventh season in 2008.

Intangibles: The Cowboys were lucky to pick up Adams in the 1998 draft, taking him in the second round. Although he has been accused of underachieving, he has been solid for a significant length of time. Dallas gave him a $42 million contract in the 2008 offseason.

Dowe Aughtman, OL, Auburn, 1984

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season for the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Dallas tried to convert Aughtman from defense to offense, but an injury suffered during his rookie season ended his career.

Larry Bethea, DL, Michigan State, 1978-83

Statistics: Bethea officially recorded five sacks, though this only includes his last two seasons in the league.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played six seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Bethea had difficulty breaking into the starting lineup in Dallas, but he lasted several years as a backup. After playing in the USFL, he fell on hard times and suffered from bouts of depression. He committed suicide in 1987.

Bill Frank, T, Colorado, 1964

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Frank signed late in the 1964 season, his last in the NFL.

John Gonzaga, DE, No College, 1960

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Gonzaga was an offensive lineman for San Francisco, but the Cowboys converted him to defense. He played one season before being traded to Detroit.

John Niland, G, Iowa, 1966-74

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: Niland was named to six Pro Bowls and made two All-Pro teams.

Longevity: He played nine seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Niland was a very fast guard who excelled as a pulling guard. He made the Pro Bowl in six of his nine seasons in Dallas. He had some psychological problems late in his career and was injured when police were forced to restrain him. This does not detract, though, from his on-field performance.

Ed Nutting, T, Georgia Tech, 1963

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Dallas acquired Nutting from Cleveland in 1962, but he was injured that year and missed the entire season. He started several games in 1963, which was his last in the NFL.

Bob Otto, DL, Idaho State, 1986

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played less than a full season with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Dallas acquired Otto after Seattle released him. However, he lasted only a short period of time with the Cowboys.

Alan Veingrad, OL, East Texas State, 1991-92

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Veingard once started over Tony Mandarich in Green Bay. Dallas acquired him via Plan B free agency in 1991, and he started a few games when Mark Tuinei was injured. He was a backup for two seasons.

Jeff Zimmerman, G, Florida, 1987-90

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Zimmerman played four seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: At 320 pounds, Zimmerman was huge for his day. His claim to fame was that he knocked Lawrence Taylor unconscious in 1987. However, injuries cost him quite a few games, and he was out of the league after 1990.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #76.

Greatest #76

  • John Niland (46%, 51 Votes)
  • Flozell Adams (43%, 48 Votes)
  • Larry Bethea (4%, 4 Votes)
  • Bob Otto (4%, 4 Votes)
  • Jeff Zimmerman (3%, 3 Votes)
  • Jerry Reynolds (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Bill Frank (0%, 0 Votes)
  • John Gonzaga (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Dowe Aughtman (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Ed Nutting (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Alan Veingrad (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 111

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My Vote: Niland

John NilandThis is a tough one between Niland and Adams. Niland was a Pro Bowler for most of his career in Dallas, and he was an important part of two Super Bowl teams. After a very promising start, Adams was a little bit slow to develop. However, he has been very good for the past five seasons. Between the two, I think Niland was an overall better player who received more accolades than Adams, who is also deserving.

The Larry Bethea story is sad. He was only 30 years old when he took his life. He is probably best remembered as one of the Dallas players chasing Joe Montana before Dwight Clark caught “The Catch.” The New York Times’ coverage of Bethea’s suicide is here.

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #76

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #76

Ten players have worn #76 for the Cowboys. This includes seven offensive linemen and three defensive linemen.

Flozell Adams, OT, Michigan State, 1998-

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: He has been named to four Pro Bowls.

Longevity: Adams will enter his eleventh season in 2008.

Intangibles: The Cowboys were lucky to pick up Adams in the 1998 draft, taking him in the second round. Although he has been accused of underachieving, he has been solid for a significant length of time. Dallas gave him a $42 million contract in the 2008 offseason.

Dowe Aughtman, OL, Auburn, 1984

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season for the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Dallas tried to convert Aughtman from defense to offense, but an injury suffered during his rookie season ended his career.

Larry Bethea, DL, Michigan State, 1978-83

Statistics: Bethea officially recorded five sacks, though this only includes his last two seasons in the league.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played six seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Bethea had difficulty breaking into the starting lineup in Dallas, but he lasted several years as a backup. After playing in the USFL, he fell on hard times and suffered from bouts of depression. He committed suicide in 1987.

Bill Frank, T, Colorado, 1964

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Frank signed late in the 1964 season, his last in the NFL.

John Gonzaga, DE, No College, 1960

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Gonzaga was an offensive lineman for San Francisco, but the Cowboys converted him to defense. He played one season before being traded to Detroit.

John Niland, G, Iowa, 1966-74

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: Niland was named to six Pro Bowls and made two All-Pro teams.

Longevity: He played nine seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Niland was a very fast guard who excelled as a pulling guard. He made the Pro Bowl in six of his nine seasons in Dallas. He had some psychological problems late in his career and was injured when police were forced to restrain him. This does not detract, though, from his on-field performance.

Ed Nutting, T, Georgia Tech, 1963

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Dallas acquired Nutting from Cleveland in 1962, but he was injured that year and missed the entire season. He started several games in 1963, which was his last in the NFL.

Bob Otto, DL, Idaho State, 1986

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played less than a full season with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Dallas acquired Otto after Seattle released him. However, he lasted only a short period of time with the Cowboys.

Alan Veingrad, OL, East Texas State, 1991-92

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Veingard once started over Tony Mandarich in Green Bay. Dallas acquired him via Plan B free agency in 1991, and he started a few games when Mark Tuinei was injured. He was a backup for two seasons.

Jeff Zimmerman, G, Florida, 1987-90

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Zimmerman played four seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: At 320 pounds, Zimmerman was huge for his day. His claim to fame was that he knocked Lawrence Taylor unconscious in 1987. However, injuries cost him quite a few games, and he was out of the league after 1990.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #76.

Greatest #76

  • John Niland (46%, 51 Votes)
  • Flozell Adams (43%, 48 Votes)
  • Larry Bethea (4%, 4 Votes)
  • Bob Otto (4%, 4 Votes)
  • Jeff Zimmerman (3%, 3 Votes)
  • Jerry Reynolds (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Bill Frank (0%, 0 Votes)
  • John Gonzaga (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Dowe Aughtman (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Ed Nutting (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Alan Veingrad (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 111

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My Vote: Niland

John NilandThis is a tough one between Niland and Adams. Niland was a Pro Bowler for most of his career in Dallas, and he was an important part of two Super Bowl teams. After a very promising start, Adams was a little bit slow to develop. However, he has been very good for the past five seasons. Between the two, I think Niland was an overall better player who received more accolades than Adams, who is also deserving.

The Larry Bethea story is sad. He was only 30 years old when he took his life. He is probably best remembered as one of the Dallas players chasing Joe Montana before Dwight Clark caught “The Catch.” The New York Times’ coverage of Bethea’s suicide is here.

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #75

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #75

Nine players have worn #75 for the Cowboys. This includes five defensive linemen and four offensive linemen.

Jon Carter, DT, Pittsburgh, 1989

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Carter was one of several defensive linemen who saw action in 1989. He was out of the league after that season.

Tony Casillas, DT, Oklahoma, 1991-93, 1996-97

Statistics: Casillas recorded 10.5 sacks and 203 tackles with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None with Dallas.

Longevity: He played a total of five years in Dallas on two tours of duty.

Intangibles: Casillas was a bit of a bust in Atlanta, after being selected in the first round of the 1986 draft by the Falcons. He arrived in Dallas after missing nearly half of the 1990 season, but he was an important part of the first two Super Bowl teams of the 1990s. He left after the 1993 season but returned in 1996.

Marc Colombo, OT, Boston College, 2006-

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He will enter his third season in Dallas in 2008.

Intangibles: Columbo was a bust as a first-round pick in Chicago, but he has been a solid right tackle with the Cowboys. This may be his final season with the Cowboys, depending on free agency.

Bob Fry, T, Kentucky, 1960-64

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played five seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: The Cowboys acquired Fry in the 1960 expansion draft, and he started at both right and left tackle for the Cowboys.

Brandon Noble, DT, Penn State, 1999-02

Statistics: Noble recorded 7.5 sacks and 101 tackles with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played four seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Noble became a starter with Dallas during the bad 5-11 seasons earlier this decade. He was gone as Bill Parcells arrived.

Phil Pozderac, T, Notre Dame, 1982-87

Statistics: He is actually taller than Ed Jones.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Pozderac played six season in Dallas.

Intangibles: He developed into a starter but is probably best remembered for false start penalties in 1986. He quit football in 1987.

Jethro Pugh, DT, Elizabeth City, 1965-78

Statistics: He led the team in sacks for five consecutive years, and he recovered a total of 14 fumbles during his career.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played 14 seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Pugh played in the shadows of Bob Lilly and Randy White, but he was an excellent player in his own right. One Dallas sportswriter said that Pugh was the greatest defensive lineman in history who was never selected to the Pro Bowl.

Marcellus Wiley, DE, Columbia, 2004

Statistics: Wiley recorded three sacks and 31 tackles with Dallas.

Accolades: None with Dallas.

Longevity: He played one season with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Wiley recorded a couple of double-digit sack seasons with the Chargers, but he did not accomplish much in Dallas.

Ryan Young, T, Kansas State, 2003

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Young was one of the former Jets signed by Bill Parcells in 2003. However, injuries slowed Young quite a bit, and he was gone from football after one season in Dallas.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #75.

Greatest #75

  • Jethro Pugh (78%, 84 Votes)
  • Tony Casillas (17%, 18 Votes)
  • Marc Colombo (4%, 4 Votes)
  • Brandon Noble (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Marcellus Wiley (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Jon Carter (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Bob Fry (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Phil Pozderac (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Ryan Young (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 108

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My Vote: Pugh

Jethro PughThis number presented an interesting mix of players. We have first-round busts in Marc Columbo and Tony Casillas, who came to Dallas and became very good role players. We have fairly big free agent signees in Marcellus Wiley and Ryan Young, neither of whom did much in Dallas. And you have Jethro Pugh, who came from tiny Elizabeth City State College and went on to play in five Super Bowls for the Cowboys. He may not have been named to a Pro Bowl, but he’s the best #75 the Cowboys have ever had.

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #75

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #75

Nine players have worn #75 for the Cowboys. This includes five defensive linemen and four offensive linemen.

Jon Carter, DT, Pittsburgh, 1989

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Carter was one of several defensive linemen who saw action in 1989. He was out of the league after that season.

Tony Casillas, DT, Oklahoma, 1991-93, 1996-97

Statistics: Casillas recorded 10.5 sacks and 203 tackles with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None with Dallas.

Longevity: He played a total of five years in Dallas on two tours of duty.

Intangibles: Casillas was a bit of a bust in Atlanta, after being selected in the first round of the 1986 draft by the Falcons. He arrived in Dallas after missing nearly half of the 1990 season, but he was an important part of the first two Super Bowl teams of the 1990s. He left after the 1993 season but returned in 1996.

Marc Colombo, OT, Boston College, 2006-

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He will enter his third season in Dallas in 2008.

Intangibles: Columbo was a bust as a first-round pick in Chicago, but he has been a solid right tackle with the Cowboys. This may be his final season with the Cowboys, depending on free agency.

Bob Fry, T, Kentucky, 1960-64

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played five seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: The Cowboys acquired Fry in the 1960 expansion draft, and he started at both right and left tackle for the Cowboys.

Brandon Noble, DT, Penn State, 1999-02

Statistics: Noble recorded 7.5 sacks and 101 tackles with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played four seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Noble became a starter with Dallas during the bad 5-11 seasons earlier this decade. He was gone as Bill Parcells arrived.

Phil Pozderac, T, Notre Dame, 1982-87

Statistics: He is actually taller than Ed Jones.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Pozderac played six season in Dallas.

Intangibles: He developed into a starter but is probably best remembered for false start penalties in 1986. He quit football in 1987.

Jethro Pugh, DT, Elizabeth City, 1965-78

Statistics: He led the team in sacks for five consecutive years, and he recovered a total of 14 fumbles during his career.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played 14 seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Pugh played in the shadows of Bob Lilly and Randy White, but he was an excellent player in his own right. One Dallas sportswriter said that Pugh was the greatest defensive lineman in history who was never selected to the Pro Bowl.

Marcellus Wiley, DE, Columbia, 2004

Statistics: Wiley recorded three sacks and 31 tackles with Dallas.

Accolades: None with Dallas.

Longevity: He played one season with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Wiley recorded a couple of double-digit sack seasons with the Chargers, but he did not accomplish much in Dallas.

Ryan Young, T, Kansas State, 2003

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Young was one of the former Jets signed by Bill Parcells in 2003. However, injuries slowed Young quite a bit, and he was gone from football after one season in Dallas.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #75.

Greatest #75

  • Jethro Pugh (78%, 84 Votes)
  • Tony Casillas (17%, 18 Votes)
  • Marc Colombo (4%, 4 Votes)
  • Brandon Noble (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Marcellus Wiley (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Jon Carter (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Bob Fry (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Phil Pozderac (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Ryan Young (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 108

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My Vote: Pugh

Jethro PughThis number presented an interesting mix of players. We have first-round busts in Marc Columbo and Tony Casillas, who came to Dallas and became very good role players. We have fairly big free agent signees in Marcellus Wiley and Ryan Young, neither of whom did much in Dallas. And you have Jethro Pugh, who came from tiny Elizabeth City State College and went on to play in five Super Bowls for the Cowboys. He may not have been named to a Pro Bowl, but he’s the best #75 the Cowboys have ever had.

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #74

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #74

This number is the answer to a little trivia question: which number has only been worn by one member of the Dallas Cowboys?

That would be Mr. Cowboy, the first member of the Dallas Cowboys Ring of Honor, and one of the great defensive linemen to play professional football.

So, no poll for this one. Nobody has worn #74 since Bob Lilly retired after the 1974 season.

* * *

Thanks to Fred Goodwin, we know that Lilly’s autobiography is coming out in about a month. Here is the information about the book:

A Cowboy’s Life (Hardcover)

by Bob Lilly (Author), Kristine Clark (Author), Roger Staubach (Foreword)
List Price: $24.95

# Hardcover: 256 pages
# Publisher: Triumph Books (September 10, 2008)
# Language: English
# ISBN-10: 1600781012
# ISBN-13: 978-1600781018

Book Description

Bob Lilly is Mr. Cowboy. The humble man from Throckmorton, Texas, often called “the greatest defensive tackle in NFL history,” shares his life’s journey for the first time in A Cowboy’s Life. Lilly recounts his humble beginnings in Texas, being the first player ever drafted by the Dallas Cowboys in 1961, his induction into the Ring of Honor, and his passion for photography. It’s all here: Lilly’s innumerable successes, his injuries, the stories of what he did after he retired from the Cowboys, and what he is doing today. Well supplemented with many never-before-published photographs taken by Lilly himself, A Cowboy’s Life is the real story of Mr. Cowboy, straight from the man who lived it all.

From the Publisher

“A man like that comes along once in a lifetime. He is something a little more than great. Nobody is better than Bob Lilly.”
–Tom Landry

“Regardless of whether Bob was double-teamed or even triple-teamed, he’d still beat you. There were times when he didn’t even confront the opposition at all. He would either jump over them, go around them, or strategically outsmart them by making the play.”
–Roger Staubach, from the foreword

* * *

For those who like puzzles, I though this gadget was pretty interesting.




provided by flash-gear.com


Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #74

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #74

This number is the answer to a little trivia question: which number has only been worn by one member of the Dallas Cowboys?

That would be Mr. Cowboy, the first member of the Dallas Cowboys Ring of Honor, and one of the great defensive linemen to play professional football.

So, no poll for this one. Nobody has worn #74 since Bob Lilly retired after the 1974 season.

* * *

Thanks to Fred Goodwin, we know that Lilly’s autobiography is coming out in about a month. Here is the information about the book:

A Cowboy’s Life (Hardcover)

by Bob Lilly (Author), Kristine Clark (Author), Roger Staubach (Foreword)
List Price: $24.95

# Hardcover: 256 pages
# Publisher: Triumph Books (September 10, 2008)
# Language: English
# ISBN-10: 1600781012
# ISBN-13: 978-1600781018

Book Description

Bob Lilly is Mr. Cowboy. The humble man from Throckmorton, Texas, often called “the greatest defensive tackle in NFL history,” shares his life’s journey for the first time in A Cowboy’s Life. Lilly recounts his humble beginnings in Texas, being the first player ever drafted by the Dallas Cowboys in 1961, his induction into the Ring of Honor, and his passion for photography. It’s all here: Lilly’s innumerable successes, his injuries, the stories of what he did after he retired from the Cowboys, and what he is doing today. Well supplemented with many never-before-published photographs taken by Lilly himself, A Cowboy’s Life is the real story of Mr. Cowboy, straight from the man who lived it all.

From the Publisher

“A man like that comes along once in a lifetime. He is something a little more than great. Nobody is better than Bob Lilly.”
–Tom Landry

“Regardless of whether Bob was double-teamed or even triple-teamed, he’d still beat you. There were times when he didn’t even confront the opposition at all. He would either jump over them, go around them, or strategically outsmart them by making the play.”
–Roger Staubach, from the foreword

* * *

For those who like puzzles, I though this gadget was pretty interesting.




provided by flash-gear.com


Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #73

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #73

Eight players have worn #73 for the Cowboys. This includes seven offensive linemen and one defensive lineman.

Larry Allen, G/T, Sonoma State, 1994-05

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: Allen played in ten Pro Bowls as a Cowboy and made six All-Pro teams. He will almost certainly be inducted into the Ring of Honor and Hall of Fame.

Longevity: He played 12 seasons in Dallas. He appears to have retired after playing two seasons in San Francisco.

Intangibles: Very few linemen have earned as much attention as Allen. His strength is legendary, as was his ability to move for a man his size. He played four different positions on the offensive line during his career in Dallas, and he excelled at every position.

Dave Burnette, T, Central Arkansas, 1987

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played in one replacement game in 1987.

Intangibles: He was originally as 12th round draft choice by the Colts in 1985.

Monte Clark, T, Southern California, 1962

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Clark played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Dallas acquired him from San Francisco in 1962, and he was a starter for one season. Dallas traded him to Cleveland in 1963. Clark later became a head coach with the 49ers and Lions.

Syd Kitson, G, Wake Forest, 1984

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played less than a full season with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Kitson was a part-time starter with the Packers before being released. Dallas signed him, but he only played one game with the Cowboys.

Ralph Neely, G/T, Oklahoma, 1965-77

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: He made two Pro Bowls and three All-Pro teams.

Longevity: Neely played 13 seasons with the Cowboys, despite a variety of injuries.

Intangibles: Neely was the anchor of the Dallas offensive line for many years. He played both right tackle and left tackle and started in four of the five Dallas Super Bowls of the 1970s. He was nicknamed “Rotten,” apparently because he was so mean to rookies.

Danny Noonan, DL, Nebraska, 1987-92

Statistics: Noonan recorded 15 sacks with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played six seasons in Dallas before being released during the 1992 season.

Intangibles: Taken 12th in the 1987 draft, Noonan was the highest Dallas pick since Tony Dorsett in 1977. Noonan became a starter by 1988, but injuries slowed his career quite a bit. Though not a bust on the same level as Kevin Brooks, Billy Cannon, or Rod Hill, he never came close to becoming a great defensive lineman.

Kurt Ploeger, DL, Gustavus Adolphus, 1986

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played less than a full season with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Dallas drafted Ploeger in 1985, but he was injured that season. He played three games with Dallas in 1986 before he was released. He also played with the Packers and Vikings.

Steve Wright, T, Northern Iowa, 1981-82

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Wright was waived by Dallas in 1982, but he managed to stay in the league. He developed into a starter for the Colts and Raiders (he also had a stint in the USFL) and enjoyed a lengthy career.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #73.

Greatest #73

  • Larry Allen (92%, 110 Votes)
  • Ralph Neely (8%, 10 Votes)
  • Kurt Ploeger (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Dave Burnette (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Monte Clark (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Syd Kitson (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Danny Noonan (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Steve Wright (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 120

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My Vote: Allen

Larry AllenThis one is not quite a clear-cut as some may think, given that Neely was an outstanding lineman for many years. However, this one should go to Allen, who is one of the best linemen in NFL history. Very few professional athletes have been stronger, few linemen have been quicker, and even fewer linemen have been as versatile as Allen.

Neely was a better tackle than most and was a great complement to Rayfield Wright during the 1970s. The others were mostly backups or– in the case of Noonan– at least a semi-bust.

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #73

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #73

Eight players have worn #73 for the Cowboys. This includes seven offensive linemen and one defensive lineman.

Larry Allen, G/T, Sonoma State, 1994-05

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: Allen played in ten Pro Bowls as a Cowboy and made six All-Pro teams. He will almost certainly be inducted into the Ring of Honor and Hall of Fame.

Longevity: He played 12 seasons in Dallas. He appears to have retired after playing two seasons in San Francisco.

Intangibles: Very few linemen have earned as much attention as Allen. His strength is legendary, as was his ability to move for a man his size. He played four different positions on the offensive line during his career in Dallas, and he excelled at every position.

Dave Burnette, T, Central Arkansas, 1987

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played in one replacement game in 1987.

Intangibles: He was originally as 12th round draft choice by the Colts in 1985.

Monte Clark, T, Southern California, 1962

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Clark played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Dallas acquired him from San Francisco in 1962, and he was a starter for one season. Dallas traded him to Cleveland in 1963. Clark later became a head coach with the 49ers and Lions.

Syd Kitson, G, Wake Forest, 1984

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played less than a full season with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Kitson was a part-time starter with the Packers before being released. Dallas signed him, but he only played one game with the Cowboys.

Ralph Neely, G/T, Oklahoma, 1965-77

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: He made two Pro Bowls and three All-Pro teams.

Longevity: Neely played 13 seasons with the Cowboys, despite a variety of injuries.

Intangibles: Neely was the anchor of the Dallas offensive line for many years. He played both right tackle and left tackle and started in four of the five Dallas Super Bowls of the 1970s. He was nicknamed “Rotten,” apparently because he was so mean to rookies.

Danny Noonan, DL, Nebraska, 1987-92

Statistics: Noonan recorded 15 sacks with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played six seasons in Dallas before being released during the 1992 season.

Intangibles: Taken 12th in the 1987 draft, Noonan was the highest Dallas pick since Tony Dorsett in 1977. Noonan became a starter by 1988, but injuries slowed his career quite a bit. Though not a bust on the same level as Kevin Brooks, Billy Cannon, or Rod Hill, he never came close to becoming a great defensive lineman.

Kurt Ploeger, DL, Gustavus Adolphus, 1986

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played less than a full season with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Dallas drafted Ploeger in 1985, but he was injured that season. He played three games with Dallas in 1986 before he was released. He also played with the Packers and Vikings.

Steve Wright, T, Northern Iowa, 1981-82

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Wright was waived by Dallas in 1982, but he managed to stay in the league. He developed into a starter for the Colts and Raiders (he also had a stint in the USFL) and enjoyed a lengthy career.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #73.

Greatest #73

  • Larry Allen (92%, 110 Votes)
  • Ralph Neely (8%, 10 Votes)
  • Kurt Ploeger (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Dave Burnette (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Monte Clark (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Syd Kitson (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Danny Noonan (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Steve Wright (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 120

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My Vote: Allen

Larry AllenThis one is not quite a clear-cut as some may think, given that Neely was an outstanding lineman for many years. However, this one should go to Allen, who is one of the best linemen in NFL history. Very few professional athletes have been stronger, few linemen have been quicker, and even fewer linemen have been as versatile as Allen.

Neely was a better tackle than most and was a great complement to Rayfield Wright during the 1970s. The others were mostly backups or– in the case of Noonan– at least a semi-bust.

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #72

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #72

Eight players have worn #72 for the Cowboys. This includes five defensive linemen and three offensive linemen.

Stephen Bowen, DE, Hofstra, 2006-present

Statistics: Bowen has recorded one sack and 10 tackles.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He will enter his third season in 2008.

Intangibles: Bowen saw quite a bit of action in 2007 as part of the rotation on defensive line. He finished fourth on the team in quarterback pressures.

Louis Cheek, OL, Texas A&M, 1990

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: The Cowboys signed Cheek as a Plan B free agent in 1990, but he lasted only part of the season.

Ray Childress, DT, Texas A&M, 1996

Statistics: Childress recorded one sack with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None with Dallas.

Longevity: He played part of one season with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Dallas signed Childress in 1996 to replace Leon Lett, who had been suspended. Childress was a legend in Houston, but he was not the same player with the Cowboys. He retired after the 1996 season.

Bill Herchman, DT, Texas Tech, 1960-61

Statistics: Herchman recovered two fumbles with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Dallas acquired Herchman via trade before the 1960 season, and he became a starter immediately. Dallas traded him to Houston before the 1962 season.

Ed Jones, DE, Tennessee State, 1974-78, 1980-89

Statistics: Jones officially recorded 57.5 sacks. Unofficially, he had 106.

Accolades: He was named to three Pro Bowls and one first-team All-Pro team.

Longevity: Jones played fifteen seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Too Tall was one of the great defensive linemen in team history. He was very good before taking a year off to become a boxer, and he seemed to become better when he returned to the team in 1980 after his boxing career failed. His height was good for more than his nickname; due to his size, many quarterbacks had difficulty throwing over him, and he probably had more career blocked passes than anyone else in history.

Tony Liscio, T, Tulsa, 1963-64, 1966-71

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played eight seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Liscio was the starting tackle for the Cowboys in many of the team’s greatest games. He was part of a trade in 1970 that brought Lance Alworth from San Diego, but he returned to Dallas in 1971 when Ralph Neely broke his leg in a motorcycle accident. Liscio’s final NFL game was Super Bowl VI.

Dwayne Missouri, DE, Northwestern, 2001

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Missouri saw action in three games in 2001.

Stephen Peterman, G, Louisiana State, 2005

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Peterman was part of the failure of a draft in 2004. He was taken in the third round that season, but he saw action in only three games with the Cowboys. He later played with the Lions.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #72.

Greatest #72

  • Ed Jones (97%, 127 Votes)
  • Tony Liscio (2%, 2 Votes)
  • Stephen Bowen (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Ray Childress (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Mike Sullivan (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Louis Cheek (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Bill Herchman (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Dwayne Missouri (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Stephen Peterman (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 131

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My Vote: Too Tall

Too Tall JonesAlong with Mark Tuinei and Bill Bates, Too Tall shares the team record for length of service. If it weren’t for his year in boxing, he might hold the record, but then again, he might not have been quite as effective as he was during the decade of the 1980s. He is often overlooked for how great he was, but few players in NFL history can claim 106 sacks.

Of the others, Liscio deserves a bit of consideration, but he did not contribute to the same extent that Jones did.

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #72

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #72

Eight players have worn #72 for the Cowboys. This includes five defensive linemen and three offensive linemen.

Stephen Bowen, DE, Hofstra, 2006-present

Statistics: Bowen has recorded one sack and 10 tackles.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He will enter his third season in 2008.

Intangibles: Bowen saw quite a bit of action in 2007 as part of the rotation on defensive line. He finished fourth on the team in quarterback pressures.

Louis Cheek, OL, Texas A&M, 1990

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: The Cowboys signed Cheek as a Plan B free agent in 1990, but he lasted only part of the season.

Ray Childress, DT, Texas A&M, 1996

Statistics: Childress recorded one sack with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None with Dallas.

Longevity: He played part of one season with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Dallas signed Childress in 1996 to replace Leon Lett, who had been suspended. Childress was a legend in Houston, but he was not the same player with the Cowboys. He retired after the 1996 season.

Bill Herchman, DT, Texas Tech, 1960-61

Statistics: Herchman recovered two fumbles with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Dallas acquired Herchman via trade before the 1960 season, and he became a starter immediately. Dallas traded him to Houston before the 1962 season.

Ed Jones, DE, Tennessee State, 1974-78, 1980-89

Statistics: Jones officially recorded 57.5 sacks. Unofficially, he had 106.

Accolades: He was named to three Pro Bowls and one first-team All-Pro team.

Longevity: Jones played fifteen seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Too Tall was one of the great defensive linemen in team history. He was very good before taking a year off to become a boxer, and he seemed to become better when he returned to the team in 1980 after his boxing career failed. His height was good for more than his nickname; due to his size, many quarterbacks had difficulty throwing over him, and he probably had more career blocked passes than anyone else in history.

Tony Liscio, T, Tulsa, 1963-64, 1966-71

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played eight seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Liscio was the starting tackle for the Cowboys in many of the team’s greatest games. He was part of a trade in 1970 that brought Lance Alworth from San Diego, but he returned to Dallas in 1971 when Ralph Neely broke his leg in a motorcycle accident. Liscio’s final NFL game was Super Bowl VI.

Dwayne Missouri, DE, Northwestern, 2001

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Missouri saw action in three games in 2001.

Stephen Peterman, G, Louisiana State, 2005

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Peterman was part of the failure of a draft in 2004. He was taken in the third round that season, but he saw action in only three games with the Cowboys. He later played with the Lions.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #72.

Greatest #72

  • Ed Jones (97%, 127 Votes)
  • Tony Liscio (2%, 2 Votes)
  • Stephen Bowen (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Ray Childress (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Mike Sullivan (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Louis Cheek (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Bill Herchman (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Dwayne Missouri (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Stephen Peterman (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 131

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My Vote: Too Tall

Too Tall JonesAlong with Mark Tuinei and Bill Bates, Too Tall shares the team record for length of service. If it weren’t for his year in boxing, he might hold the record, but then again, he might not have been quite as effective as he was during the decade of the 1980s. He is often overlooked for how great he was, but few players in NFL history can claim 106 sacks.

Of the others, Liscio deserves a bit of consideration, but he did not contribute to the same extent that Jones did.