Greatest Players by Number

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This series reviews every player in the history of the Dallas Cowboys, organized by their jersey numbers.

 

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #67

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #67

Twelve players have worn #67 for the Cowboys. This includes three defensive linemen and nine offensive linemen.

Joe Berger, G, Michigan Tech, 2007-present

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Dallas acquired Berger in 2006, but he has only seen action in one game.

Intangibles: He may not make the squad this season.

Pat Donovan, T, Stanford, 1975-83

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: Donovan made four Pro Bowls in consecutive years, from 1979 to 1982.

Longevity: Donovan played nine seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: A defensive player in college, Donovan saw action at both left and right tackle before taking over the left tackle job in 1977. He held the position until 1983, when he retired.

John Houser, C/G, Redlands, 1960-61

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: The Cowboys claimed Houser off of waivers in 1960, and he started at center that season. A year later, he played mostly at guard. He was injured in 1962 but later played for the Cardinals.

Jake Kupp, G, Washington, 1964-65

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: He was a backup at guard before being traded to Washington after the 1965 season.

George Lilja, C, Michigan, 1987

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None

Longevity: He played part of one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Lilja played in a few games during the strike-shortened season of 1987. At one time, he was a starter with the Browns.

Russell Maryland, DT, Miami, Fla., 1991-95

Statistics: Maryland recorded 14.5 sacks and 191 tackles with the Cowboys.

Accolades: He made one Pro Bowl.

Longevity: He played five seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Maryland was a quick defensive tackle who fit perfectly with the Cowboys’ speed defenses of the early 1990s. He was a vital part of all three championships before leaving for Oakland via free agency in 1996.

Everett McIver, G, Elizabeth City State, 1998-99

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: The Cowboys signed McIver to take over for Nate Newton in 1998. McIver was injured during his first season in Dallas, and he was gone from football after starting 14 games in 1999.

Joe Shearin, C, Texas, 1987

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played in one game for the Cowboys, a 24-13 loss to the Cardinals.

Intangibles: n/a

Sean Smith, DT, Grambling, 1989

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played less than a full season with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Smith played for three teams in 1989, including Dallas. He dressed for only two games.

Broderick Thompson, G, Kansas, 1985

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played only one season in Dallas but enjoyed a long career after leaving the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Thompson played for five USFL franchises. Dallas was his first stop in the NFL, and he later became a starter with the San Diego Chargers.

Pat Toomay, DE, Vanderbilt, 1970-74

Statistics: Toomay’s unofficial sack and tackle totals are unavailable. He recorded one interception with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played five seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Toomay belongs in the “author” category along with Pete Gent. This specific author category includes those who brought slightly more by way of the pen than by their play on the field. Toomay was a backup to George Andrie and Larry Cole being traded to Buffalo in 1975. He wrote The Crunch, a book about his time with the Cowboys.

Gary Walker, OL, Boston University, 1987

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He was a replacement player in 1987.

Intangibles: n/a

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #67.

Greatest #67

  • Pat Donovan (52%, 43 Votes)
  • Russell Maryland (44%, 36 Votes)
  • Pat Toomay (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Jake Kupp (1%, 1 Votes)
  • George Lilja (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Joe Berger (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Broderick Thompson (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Sean Smith (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Joe Shearin (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Everett McIver (0%, 0 Votes)
  • John Houser (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Gary Walker (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 82

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My Vote: Donovan

Pat DonovanDonovan wasn’t the dominating left tackle that Erik Williams was at times, but Donovan was very solid nevertheless. Nobody else on this list has the accolades or the longevity to match Donovan, who started in two Super Bowls. Maryland comes close, but he left at the height of his prime. Toomay was a well-known backup who did not contribute nearly as much as Donovan.

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #67

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #67

Twelve players have worn #67 for the Cowboys. This includes three defensive linemen and nine offensive linemen.

Joe Berger, G, Michigan Tech, 2007-present

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Dallas acquired Berger in 2006, but he has only seen action in one game.

Intangibles: He may not make the squad this season.

Pat Donovan, T, Stanford, 1975-83

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: Donovan made four Pro Bowls in consecutive years, from 1979 to 1982.

Longevity: Donovan played nine seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: A defensive player in college, Donovan saw action at both left and right tackle before taking over the left tackle job in 1977. He held the position until 1983, when he retired.

John Houser, C/G, Redlands, 1960-61

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: The Cowboys claimed Houser off of waivers in 1960, and he started at center that season. A year later, he played mostly at guard. He was injured in 1962 but later played for the Cardinals.

Jake Kupp, G, Washington, 1964-65

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: He was a backup at guard before being traded to Washington after the 1965 season.

George Lilja, C, Michigan, 1987

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None

Longevity: He played part of one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Lilja played in a few games during the strike-shortened season of 1987. At one time, he was a starter with the Browns.

Russell Maryland, DT, Miami, Fla., 1991-95

Statistics: Maryland recorded 14.5 sacks and 191 tackles with the Cowboys.

Accolades: He made one Pro Bowl.

Longevity: He played five seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Maryland was a quick defensive tackle who fit perfectly with the Cowboys’ speed defenses of the early 1990s. He was a vital part of all three championships before leaving for Oakland via free agency in 1996.

Everett McIver, G, Elizabeth City State, 1998-99

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: The Cowboys signed McIver to take over for Nate Newton in 1998. McIver was injured during his first season in Dallas, and he was gone from football after starting 14 games in 1999.

Joe Shearin, C, Texas, 1987

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played in one game for the Cowboys, a 24-13 loss to the Cardinals.

Intangibles: n/a

Sean Smith, DT, Grambling, 1989

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played less than a full season with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Smith played for three teams in 1989, including Dallas. He dressed for only two games.

Broderick Thompson, G, Kansas, 1985

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played only one season in Dallas but enjoyed a long career after leaving the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Thompson played for five USFL franchises. Dallas was his first stop in the NFL, and he later became a starter with the San Diego Chargers.

Pat Toomay, DE, Vanderbilt, 1970-74

Statistics: Toomay’s unofficial sack and tackle totals are unavailable. He recorded one interception with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played five seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Toomay belongs in the “author” category along with Pete Gent. This specific author category includes those who brought slightly more by way of the pen than by their play on the field. Toomay was a backup to George Andrie and Larry Cole being traded to Buffalo in 1975. He wrote The Crunch, a book about his time with the Cowboys.

Gary Walker, OL, Boston University, 1987

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He was a replacement player in 1987.

Intangibles: n/a

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #67.

Greatest #67

  • Pat Donovan (52%, 43 Votes)
  • Russell Maryland (44%, 36 Votes)
  • Pat Toomay (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Jake Kupp (1%, 1 Votes)
  • George Lilja (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Joe Berger (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Broderick Thompson (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Sean Smith (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Joe Shearin (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Everett McIver (0%, 0 Votes)
  • John Houser (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Gary Walker (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 82

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My Vote: Donovan

Pat DonovanDonovan wasn’t the dominating left tackle that Erik Williams was at times, but Donovan was very solid nevertheless. Nobody else on this list has the accolades or the longevity to match Donovan, who started in two Super Bowls. Maryland comes close, but he left at the height of his prime. Toomay was a well-known backup who did not contribute nearly as much as Donovan.

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #66

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #66

Eleven players have worn #66 for the Cowboys. This includes four defensive linemen and seven offensive linemen.

George Andrie, DE, Marquette, 1962-72

Statistics: Unofficially, he is credited with 97 career sacks, including 18.5 in 1966 alone, and had one career interception.

Accolades: Five Pro Bowls and one first-team All Pro selection.

Longevity: Andrie played eleven seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: The former sixth-round pick scored a touchdown during the Ice Bowl on a fumble return and also picked off a pass against San Francisco in the 1970 NFC Championship Game. He was a great big-game player.

Jesse Baker, DE, Jacksonville State, 1986

Statistics: Baker recorded one sack for the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played in only three games with Dallas.

Intangibles: The Cowboys picked up Baker after he had played several seasons with Houston. After Dallas released him, he returned to the Oilers.

Ben Fricke, G/C, Houston, 1999-01

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played three seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Dallas signed Fricke as a free agent in 1999, and he eventually started a few games at center. However, he never played a full season and was gone after three years.

Kevin Gogan, T, Washington, 1987-93

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None with Dallas, though he was named to the Pro Bowl three times.

Longevity: He played seven seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: At 6’7″, 317 pounds, Gogan was a giant for his era. He started at both guard and tackle until 1994, when he signed with the Raiders. He was named to the Pro Bowl as a Raider and 49er and also played for Miami and San Diego.

Ed Husmann, DT, Nebraska, 1960

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None with Dallas. He later made the Pro Bowl in the AFL with the Houston Oilers.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles:Husmann played five seasons with the Chicago Cardinals before Dallas picked him up in the expansion draft in 1960. He later played five more seasons with Houston.

Tony Hutson, G, N.E. Oklahoma State, 1996-99

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played three seasons with Dallas.

Intangibles: Hutson started a handful of games in the late 1990s, but he was not an especially memorable player.

Tank Johnson, DT, Washington, 2007-

Statistics: Johnson recorded two sacks and nine tackles in 2007.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Johnson will begin his second second in Dallas in 2008.

Intangibles: He was a controversial free agent pickup in 2007 who appears to have turned his life around. He may very well start at nose tackle in 2008.

Burton Lawless, G, Florida, 1975-79

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played five seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Lawless was the only member of the Dirty Dozen of the 1975 draft to earn a starting job as a rookie, but he lost that job to Herb Scott in 1976. He served as a messenger guard for most of the remainder of the decade before being traded to Detroit in 1980.

Jeremy McKinney, G/T, Iowa, 2002

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played less than a full season with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: McKinney started a couple of games in 2002 but was injured and released by November.

Chris Schultz, T, Arizona, 1983, 1985

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Schultz was a defensive lineman whom the Cowboys tried to convert to offensive line. He played sparingly in 1983 and was injured in 1984. He bulked up by 1985 and became a starter, but his knees were so bad that he called it a career after that season.

Norm Wells, G, Northwestern, 1980

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Wells played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Wells was yet another former college defensive lineman who converted to offense. He was injured as a rookie, however, and seldom played.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #66.

Greatest #66

  • George Andrie (64%, 66 Votes)
  • Kevin Gogan (27%, 28 Votes)
  • Tank Johnson (6%, 6 Votes)
  • Norm Wells (2%, 2 Votes)
  • Ben Fricke (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Ed Husmann (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Jesse Baker (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Burton Lawless (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Jeremy McKinney (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Chris Schultz (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Tony Hutson (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 103

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My Vote: Andrie

Georgie Andrie, Dallas CowboysAndrie was a mainstay with the Doomsday Defense for more than a decade. Most older fans remember him well, but he does not get the credit he deserves when the subject of great defensive ends comes up. He made one more Pro Bowl than Harvey Martin and two more than Too Tall Jones, and frankly Andrie had more big-game plays than either did, even though Harvey was a Super Bowl MVP. I’m wouldn’t argue that he’s the greatest defensive end in history, but he needs to be mentioned in the same category as those two.

Lawless and Gogan were only part-time starters, and Johnson has only been around for half of a season. The others were mostly backups.

* * *

Here are two shots of Andrie chasing Bart Starr in the Ice Bowl and then returning Starr’s fumble for a touchdown.

Georgie Andrie, Dallas Cowboys, Ice Bowl

Georgie Andrie, Dallas Cowboys, Ice Bowl

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #66

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #66

Eleven players have worn #66 for the Cowboys. This includes four defensive linemen and seven offensive linemen.

George Andrie, DE, Marquette, 1962-72

Statistics: Unofficially, he is credited with 97 career sacks, including 18.5 in 1966 alone, and had one career interception.

Accolades: Five Pro Bowls and one first-team All Pro selection.

Longevity: Andrie played eleven seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: The former sixth-round pick scored a touchdown during the Ice Bowl on a fumble return and also picked off a pass against San Francisco in the 1970 NFC Championship Game. He was a great big-game player.

Jesse Baker, DE, Jacksonville State, 1986

Statistics: Baker recorded one sack for the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played in only three games with Dallas.

Intangibles: The Cowboys picked up Baker after he had played several seasons with Houston. After Dallas released him, he returned to the Oilers.

Ben Fricke, G/C, Houston, 1999-01

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played three seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Dallas signed Fricke as a free agent in 1999, and he eventually started a few games at center. However, he never played a full season and was gone after three years.

Kevin Gogan, T, Washington, 1987-93

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None with Dallas, though he was named to the Pro Bowl three times.

Longevity: He played seven seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: At 6’7″, 317 pounds, Gogan was a giant for his era. He started at both guard and tackle until 1994, when he signed with the Raiders. He was named to the Pro Bowl as a Raider and 49er and also played for Miami and San Diego.

Ed Husmann, DT, Nebraska, 1960

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None with Dallas. He later made the Pro Bowl in the AFL with the Houston Oilers.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles:Husmann played five seasons with the Chicago Cardinals before Dallas picked him up in the expansion draft in 1960. He later played five more seasons with Houston.

Tony Hutson, G, N.E. Oklahoma State, 1996-99

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played three seasons with Dallas.

Intangibles: Hutson started a handful of games in the late 1990s, but he was not an especially memorable player.

Tank Johnson, DT, Washington, 2007-

Statistics: Johnson recorded two sacks and nine tackles in 2007.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Johnson will begin his second second in Dallas in 2008.

Intangibles: He was a controversial free agent pickup in 2007 who appears to have turned his life around. He may very well start at nose tackle in 2008.

Burton Lawless, G, Florida, 1975-79

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played five seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Lawless was the only member of the Dirty Dozen of the 1975 draft to earn a starting job as a rookie, but he lost that job to Herb Scott in 1976. He served as a messenger guard for most of the remainder of the decade before being traded to Detroit in 1980.

Jeremy McKinney, G/T, Iowa, 2002

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played less than a full season with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: McKinney started a couple of games in 2002 but was injured and released by November.

Chris Schultz, T, Arizona, 1983, 1985

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Schultz was a defensive lineman whom the Cowboys tried to convert to offensive line. He played sparingly in 1983 and was injured in 1984. He bulked up by 1985 and became a starter, but his knees were so bad that he called it a career after that season.

Norm Wells, G, Northwestern, 1980

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Wells played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Wells was yet another former college defensive lineman who converted to offense. He was injured as a rookie, however, and seldom played.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #66.

Greatest #66

  • George Andrie (64%, 66 Votes)
  • Kevin Gogan (27%, 28 Votes)
  • Tank Johnson (6%, 6 Votes)
  • Norm Wells (2%, 2 Votes)
  • Ben Fricke (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Ed Husmann (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Jesse Baker (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Burton Lawless (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Jeremy McKinney (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Chris Schultz (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Tony Hutson (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 103

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My Vote: Andrie

Georgie Andrie, Dallas CowboysAndrie was a mainstay with the Doomsday Defense for more than a decade. Most older fans remember him well, but he does not get the credit he deserves when the subject of great defensive ends comes up. He made one more Pro Bowl than Harvey Martin and two more than Too Tall Jones, and frankly Andrie had more big-game plays than either did, even though Harvey was a Super Bowl MVP. I’m wouldn’t argue that he’s the greatest defensive end in history, but he needs to be mentioned in the same category as those two.

Lawless and Gogan were only part-time starters, and Johnson has only been around for half of a season. The others were mostly backups.

* * *

Here are two shots of Andrie chasing Bart Starr in the Ice Bowl and then returning Starr’s fumble for a touchdown.

Georgie Andrie, Dallas Cowboys, Ice Bowl

Georgie Andrie, Dallas Cowboys, Ice Bowl

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #65

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #65

Seven players have worn #65 for the Cowboys. This includes six offensive linemen and one defensive lineman.

Andre Gurode, C, Colorado, 2002-present

Andre GurodeStatistics: n/a

Accolades: Gurode has been named to two consecutive Pro Bowls.

Longevity: He will enter his seventh season in Dallas in 2008.

Intangibles: Gurode turned out to be one of the best draft picks of this decade. A second-round selection in 2002, he began his career starting at right guard (with moderate results), but he made the transition to center, where he has become a Pro Bowler.

Kurt Petersen, G, Missouri, 1980-85

Kurt PetersenStatistics: n/a

Accolades: He received second-team All-Pro by the Newspaper Enterprise Association in 1982.

Longevity: He played six seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Petersen took over at right guard in 1981 when Tom Rafferty became the starting center in 1981. He was solid during a career shortened by injury.

Ray Schoenke, T, Southern Methodist, 1963-64

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Schoenke played two years in Dallas but enjoyed a much longer career with the Washington Redskins.

Tony Slaton, G, Southern Cal., 1990

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He spent one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Slaton played in Los Angeles for five years before earning a spot in the starting lineup. After starting during the 1989 season for the Rams, though, he signed with Dallas, where he was mostly a backup.

Dave Stalls, DE, Northern Colorado, 1977-79

Statistics: His official stats are not available, but he was a pass-rush specialist who recorded a number of sacks.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played three seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Stalls worked hard in the weight room, and after serving as a backup in 1977 and 1978, he earned a starting job at left tackle in 1979. That lasted until the Cowboys acquired John Dutton and moved Larry Cole back to left tackle. Dallas traded Stalls to Tampa Bay the following year.

Ron Stone, G, Boston College, 1993-95

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None with Dallas. He later became a Pro Bowler with the Giants and 49ers.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Stone was a backup in 1994 and 1995 before joining the Giants, where he became a longtime starter. He was a player Dallas wished it had back by 1997.

John Wilbur, T, Stanford, 1966-69

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played four seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Wilbur was another player who converted from defensive line to offensive line. He was known for fighting other Cowboys during training camp, and he was traded to the Rams in 1970.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #65.

Greatest #65

  • Andre Gurode (98%, 120 Votes)
  • Kurt Petersen (2%, 2 Votes)
  • Dave Stalls (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Ray Schoenke (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Tony Slaton (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Ron Stone (0%, 0 Votes)
  • John Wilbur (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 123

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My Vote: Gurode

Andre GurodeThe only real contenders on this list are Gurode and Petersen, and I think Gurode is a better (and especially more durable) player than Petersen was. Gurode could improve his deep-snapping, but overall, he is becoming an excellent center.

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #65

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #65

Seven players have worn #65 for the Cowboys. This includes six offensive linemen and one defensive lineman.

Andre Gurode, C, Colorado, 2002-present

Andre GurodeStatistics: n/a

Accolades: Gurode has been named to two consecutive Pro Bowls.

Longevity: He will enter his seventh season in Dallas in 2008.

Intangibles: Gurode turned out to be one of the best draft picks of this decade. A second-round selection in 2002, he began his career starting at right guard (with moderate results), but he made the transition to center, where he has become a Pro Bowler.

Kurt Petersen, G, Missouri, 1980-85

Kurt PetersenStatistics: n/a

Accolades: He received second-team All-Pro by the Newspaper Enterprise Association in 1982.

Longevity: He played six seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Petersen took over at right guard in 1981 when Tom Rafferty became the starting center in 1981. He was solid during a career shortened by injury.

Ray Schoenke, T, Southern Methodist, 1963-64

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Schoenke played two years in Dallas but enjoyed a much longer career with the Washington Redskins.

Tony Slaton, G, Southern Cal., 1990

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He spent one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Slaton played in Los Angeles for five years before earning a spot in the starting lineup. After starting during the 1989 season for the Rams, though, he signed with Dallas, where he was mostly a backup.

Dave Stalls, DE, Northern Colorado, 1977-79

Statistics: His official stats are not available, but he was a pass-rush specialist who recorded a number of sacks.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played three seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Stalls worked hard in the weight room, and after serving as a backup in 1977 and 1978, he earned a starting job at left tackle in 1979. That lasted until the Cowboys acquired John Dutton and moved Larry Cole back to left tackle. Dallas traded Stalls to Tampa Bay the following year.

Ron Stone, G, Boston College, 1993-95

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None with Dallas. He later became a Pro Bowler with the Giants and 49ers.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Stone was a backup in 1994 and 1995 before joining the Giants, where he became a longtime starter. He was a player Dallas wished it had back by 1997.

John Wilbur, T, Stanford, 1966-69

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played four seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Wilbur was another player who converted from defensive line to offensive line. He was known for fighting other Cowboys during training camp, and he was traded to the Rams in 1970.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #65.

Greatest #65

  • Andre Gurode (98%, 120 Votes)
  • Kurt Petersen (2%, 2 Votes)
  • Dave Stalls (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Ray Schoenke (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Tony Slaton (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Ron Stone (0%, 0 Votes)
  • John Wilbur (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 123

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My Vote: Gurode

Andre GurodeThe only real contenders on this list are Gurode and Petersen, and I think Gurode is a better (and especially more durable) player than Petersen was. Gurode could improve his deep-snapping, but overall, he is becoming an excellent center.

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #64

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #64

Eight players have worn #64 for the Cowboys. This includes seven offensive linemen and one defensive lineman.

Jim Arneson, C/G, Arizona, 1973-74

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: He was a backup offensive lineman and a special teams player.

Jorge Diaz, G, Texas A&M-Kingsville, 2000

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas

Intangibles: The Cowboys signed Diaz before the 2000 season, but he dressed for only nine games that year.

Bob Grottkau, G, Oregon, 1961

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Grottkau played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Dallas acquired him via trade with Detroit prior to 1961, which was his final season in the NFL.

Halvor Hagen, C/G, Weber State, 1969-70

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Hegen began his career as a defensive lineman, but he moved to offensive line in 1970. He was later traded to New England.

Mitch Johnson, G, UCLA, 1965

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Johnson was a 17th round pick in 1965. He was traded to Washington in 1966.

Tom Rafferty, G/C, Penn State, 1976-89

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played 14 seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Very few players lasted as long as Rafferty, who began his career at guard before taking over at center in 1981 due to Robert Shaw’s injury. Rafferty never missed a game during his long career.

Jim Ray Smith, G/T, Baylor, 1963-64

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None with Dallas. He was a five-time Pro Bowler with the Cleveland Browns.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Dallas acquired Smith in 1963 after he was coming off of another Pro Bowl season. He suffered a few injuries and retired after two seasons.

Daleroy Stewart, DT, Southern Miss, 2003-04

Statistics: Stewart recorded 1.5 sacks and 12 tackles with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played less than two full seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Dallas selected Stewart in the sixth round of the 2002 draft. He finally saw action in 2003 as a backup, but he was released early in the 2004 season.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #63.

Greatest #64

  • Tom Rafferty (96%, 145 Votes)
  • Jim Ray Smith (1%, 2 Votes)
  • Daleroy Stewart (1%, 2 Votes)
  • Jorge Diaz (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Mitch Johnson (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Jim Arneson (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Bob Grottkau (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Halvor Hagen (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 151

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My Vote: Rafferty

Tom RaffertyRafferty was constant presence on the Dallas line for many years. He started his career playing guard in front of Roger Staubach, and he ended it playing center in front of Troy Aikman. Few lineman receive credit for individual plays, but he and Herb Scott made the key blocks on Tony Dorsett’s 99-yard touchdown run against Minnesota in 1982. I’ll show the video later.

As it turns out, though, Rafferty used to be a #72, as shown in this card from Penn State–

Tom Rafferty, Penn State

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #64

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #64

Eight players have worn #64 for the Cowboys. This includes seven offensive linemen and one defensive lineman.

Jim Arneson, C/G, Arizona, 1973-74

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: He was a backup offensive lineman and a special teams player.

Jorge Diaz, G, Texas A&M-Kingsville, 2000

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas

Intangibles: The Cowboys signed Diaz before the 2000 season, but he dressed for only nine games that year.

Bob Grottkau, G, Oregon, 1961

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Grottkau played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Dallas acquired him via trade with Detroit prior to 1961, which was his final season in the NFL.

Halvor Hagen, C/G, Weber State, 1969-70

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Hegen began his career as a defensive lineman, but he moved to offensive line in 1970. He was later traded to New England.

Mitch Johnson, G, UCLA, 1965

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Johnson was a 17th round pick in 1965. He was traded to Washington in 1966.

Tom Rafferty, G/C, Penn State, 1976-89

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played 14 seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Very few players lasted as long as Rafferty, who began his career at guard before taking over at center in 1981 due to Robert Shaw’s injury. Rafferty never missed a game during his long career.

Jim Ray Smith, G/T, Baylor, 1963-64

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None with Dallas. He was a five-time Pro Bowler with the Cleveland Browns.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Dallas acquired Smith in 1963 after he was coming off of another Pro Bowl season. He suffered a few injuries and retired after two seasons.

Daleroy Stewart, DT, Southern Miss, 2003-04

Statistics: Stewart recorded 1.5 sacks and 12 tackles with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played less than two full seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Dallas selected Stewart in the sixth round of the 2002 draft. He finally saw action in 2003 as a backup, but he was released early in the 2004 season.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #63.

Greatest #64

  • Tom Rafferty (96%, 145 Votes)
  • Jim Ray Smith (1%, 2 Votes)
  • Daleroy Stewart (1%, 2 Votes)
  • Jorge Diaz (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Mitch Johnson (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Jim Arneson (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Bob Grottkau (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Halvor Hagen (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 151

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My Vote: Rafferty

Tom RaffertyRafferty was constant presence on the Dallas line for many years. He started his career playing guard in front of Roger Staubach, and he ended it playing center in front of Troy Aikman. Few lineman receive credit for individual plays, but he and Herb Scott made the key blocks on Tony Dorsett’s 99-yard touchdown run against Minnesota in 1982. I’ll show the video later.

As it turns out, though, Rafferty used to be a #72, as shown in this card from Penn State–

Tom Rafferty, Penn State

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #63

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #63

Eleven players have worn #63 for the Cowboys. This includes nine offensive linemen and two defensive linemen.

Lester Brinkley, DL, Mississippi, 1990

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: He was a backup defensive end.

Larry Cole, DL, Hawaii, 1968-80

Larry ColeStatistics: Cole recorded four interceptions and three defensive touchdowns during his career. He had quite a few sacks, though official statistics are not available from his era.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played 13 seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Cole once held the record for most career playoff games at 26, broken one year later by D.D. Lewis. He was a 16th round pick in 1968 who transitioned from a starting defensive end to a backup defensive tackle, and even as a backup, he continued to make big plays.

Gennaro DiNapoli, C, Virginia Tech, 2003

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: The Cowboys acquired DiNapoli in 2003 to replace an injured Al Johnson at center. However, Matt Lehr emerged as the starter, and DiNapoli was gone after one season.

Mike Falls, G, Minnesota, 1960-61

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Dallas acquired Falls when he was released by Green Bay prior to the 1960 season. He played two years in Dallas, starting several games. He later became an Episcopal chaplain.

John Flannery, G, Syracuse, 1996-97

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: The Cowboys signed Flannery in 1996 as a backup, but he was injured that season. In 1997, he started a few games in relief, but that was his last season in Dallas. He ended his career after playing one more year in St. Louis.

John Gesek, G, Cal. St. – Sacramento, 1990-93

John GesekStatistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Gesek played four seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Gesek started at right guard for the Cowboys in Super Bowl XXVII, then filled in for an injured Mark Stepnoski at center in Super Bowl XXVIII the following year. He left via free agency the following year, though the Cowboys were able to upgrade a bit by drafting Larry Allen.

Aaron Gibson, T, Wisconsin, 2001-02

Statistics: n/a (other than his weight).

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Gibson was known for being the first 400-pound football player. However, he seldom dressed for the Cowboys (two games, to be exact), and was gone after two seasons.

Mike Kiselak, C/G, Maryland, 1998

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Kiselak was a 31-year-old rookie in 1998 after spending several years in the Canadian Football League. He took over as the starter for Clay Shiver, and actually represented an upgrade. However, the Cowboys reacquired Mark Stepnoski in 1999, and Kiselak was soon gone from pro football.

Kyle Kosier, G, Arizona St, 2006-

Kyle KosierStatistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He will enter his third season in Dallas in 2008.

Intangibles: Kosier has been a solid player at right guard in the past two seasons. Though certainly not the most dominant guard the team has ever had, he has been steady.

Joe Shields, OL, Portland State, 1987

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Shields played in one game for the Cowboys.

Intangibles: He was a replacement player in 1987.

Glen Titensor, G, Brigham Young, 1981-86, 1988

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played a total of seven seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Titensor was converted from defensive line and became a starter by 1984. He was a solid though not a spectacular player with the Cowboys.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #63.

Greatest #63

  • Larry Cole (86%, 118 Votes)
  • John Gesek (7%, 10 Votes)
  • Kyle Kosier (2%, 3 Votes)
  • Glen Titensor (1%, 2 Votes)
  • John Flannery (1%, 2 Votes)
  • Mike Kiselak (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Gennaro DiNapoli (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Mike Falls (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Aaron Gibson (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Joe Shields (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Lester Brinkley (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 137

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My Vote: Cole

Larry ColeThere are quite a few solid contributors on this list, but Cole contributed the most for the longest period of time. He played in five Super Bowls and started in two. He began his career when Don Meredith was still quarterback, and he ended his career when Danny White was quarterback. He made perhaps the best play of his career in 1979 when he tackled John Riggins late in the game, allowing the Cowboys to get the ball back when they trailed Washington 34-28. I’ll show the video shortly.

Kosier, Titensor, and Gesek are or were good starters, but not great players. None have given as much to the franchise as Cole, who deserves this one.

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #63

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #63

Eleven players have worn #63 for the Cowboys. This includes nine offensive linemen and two defensive linemen.

Lester Brinkley, DL, Mississippi, 1990

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: He was a backup defensive end.

Larry Cole, DL, Hawaii, 1968-80

Larry ColeStatistics: Cole recorded four interceptions and three defensive touchdowns during his career. He had quite a few sacks, though official statistics are not available from his era.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played 13 seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Cole once held the record for most career playoff games at 26, broken one year later by D.D. Lewis. He was a 16th round pick in 1968 who transitioned from a starting defensive end to a backup defensive tackle, and even as a backup, he continued to make big plays.

Gennaro DiNapoli, C, Virginia Tech, 2003

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: The Cowboys acquired DiNapoli in 2003 to replace an injured Al Johnson at center. However, Matt Lehr emerged as the starter, and DiNapoli was gone after one season.

Mike Falls, G, Minnesota, 1960-61

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Dallas acquired Falls when he was released by Green Bay prior to the 1960 season. He played two years in Dallas, starting several games. He later became an Episcopal chaplain.

John Flannery, G, Syracuse, 1996-97

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: The Cowboys signed Flannery in 1996 as a backup, but he was injured that season. In 1997, he started a few games in relief, but that was his last season in Dallas. He ended his career after playing one more year in St. Louis.

John Gesek, G, Cal. St. – Sacramento, 1990-93

John GesekStatistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Gesek played four seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Gesek started at right guard for the Cowboys in Super Bowl XXVII, then filled in for an injured Mark Stepnoski at center in Super Bowl XXVIII the following year. He left via free agency the following year, though the Cowboys were able to upgrade a bit by drafting Larry Allen.

Aaron Gibson, T, Wisconsin, 2001-02

Statistics: n/a (other than his weight).

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Gibson was known for being the first 400-pound football player. However, he seldom dressed for the Cowboys (two games, to be exact), and was gone after two seasons.

Mike Kiselak, C/G, Maryland, 1998

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Kiselak was a 31-year-old rookie in 1998 after spending several years in the Canadian Football League. He took over as the starter for Clay Shiver, and actually represented an upgrade. However, the Cowboys reacquired Mark Stepnoski in 1999, and Kiselak was soon gone from pro football.

Kyle Kosier, G, Arizona St, 2006-

Kyle KosierStatistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He will enter his third season in Dallas in 2008.

Intangibles: Kosier has been a solid player at right guard in the past two seasons. Though certainly not the most dominant guard the team has ever had, he has been steady.

Joe Shields, OL, Portland State, 1987

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Shields played in one game for the Cowboys.

Intangibles: He was a replacement player in 1987.

Glen Titensor, G, Brigham Young, 1981-86, 1988

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played a total of seven seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Titensor was converted from defensive line and became a starter by 1984. He was a solid though not a spectacular player with the Cowboys.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #63.

Greatest #63

  • Larry Cole (86%, 118 Votes)
  • John Gesek (7%, 10 Votes)
  • Kyle Kosier (2%, 3 Votes)
  • Glen Titensor (1%, 2 Votes)
  • John Flannery (1%, 2 Votes)
  • Mike Kiselak (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Gennaro DiNapoli (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Mike Falls (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Aaron Gibson (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Joe Shields (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Lester Brinkley (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 137

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My Vote: Cole

Larry ColeThere are quite a few solid contributors on this list, but Cole contributed the most for the longest period of time. He played in five Super Bowls and started in two. He began his career when Don Meredith was still quarterback, and he ended his career when Danny White was quarterback. He made perhaps the best play of his career in 1979 when he tackled John Riggins late in the game, allowing the Cowboys to get the ball back when they trailed Washington 34-28. I’ll show the video shortly.

Kosier, Titensor, and Gesek are or were good starters, but not great players. None have given as much to the franchise as Cole, who deserves this one.