Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #92

[ratings]

[tags]Dallas Cowboys, Tony Tolbert[/tags]

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #92

Four Cowboys have worn #92. All were defensive linemen.

[Note: This list does not include Marcus Dixon, who is currently on the practice squad and has never played in a regular season game]

Jermaine Brooks, DT, Arkansas, 2003

Statistics: Brooks recorded a total of five regular season tackles, all in one game.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He was active for the final game of the 2003 season as well as the playoff loss to Carolina in January 2004.

Intangibles: Brooks was on the practice squad for a couple of years and saw action only during the end of the 2003 season.

Demetric Evans, DE, Georgia, 2001-02

Statistics: Evans recorded one sack with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Evans was a backup for the Cowboys before moving on to play in Washington, where he has been for the past five seasons.

Ray Perkins, DE, Virginia, 1987

Statistics: Perkins recorded two sacks for the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played in two replacement games in 1987.

Intangibles: n/a

Tony Tolbert, DL, Texas-El Paso, 1989-97

Statistics: Tolbert recorded 59 sacks with the Cowboys along with 531 tackles.

Accolades: He was named to one Pro Bowl.

Longevity: Tolbert played nine seasons for the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Dallas drafted Tolbert as a 226-pound outside linebacker, but after bulking up to more than 260, became a standout defensive end. He was the key to the Cowboys defense becoming so tough against the run during the early 1990s.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #92.

Greatest #92

  • Tony Tolbert (93%, 63 Votes)
  • Demetric Evans (4%, 3 Votes)
  • Ray Perkins (3%, 2 Votes)
  • Jermaine Brooks (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 68

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My Vote: Tolbert

Tony Tolbert

Tony Tolbert

This one wasn’t much of a contest. Tolbert was one of the best draft picks (4th round, 1989) in franchise history. He was the key to the run defense, and he was also quite effective as a pass rusher. Knee injuries slowed him down towards the ends of his career, though he still had five sacks and 30 tackles during the 1997 season, his last.

Trivia: Cowboys vs. Packers

[ratings]

[tags]Dallas Cowboys, Green Bay Packers[/tags]

Here are ten trivia questions about the game between the Cowboys and Packers.

Rate the Cowboys: Week 3 vs. Packers

[tags]Dallas Cowboys, Green Bay Packers[/tags]

Here are this week’s ratings for the Cowboys’ 27-16 win over Green Bay on Sunday:

My votes:

Tony Romo – 4 Stars: Romo managed the game well and made the big plays when he had to. Two intentional grounding penalties and an interception in the end zone brings this down a star.

Marion Barber – 5 Stars: Barber ran tough and made the big runs in the second half when the offensive line was beginning to dominate the Packers’ defensive line.

Terrell Owens – 3 Stars: Owens did not have a productive night, but he was also drawing attention that allowed others to shine. He missed a couple of opportunities, so he gets three stars.

Patrick Crayton – 2 Stars: Romo attempted four passes to Crayton, who caught none. I am not sure Crayton did anything poorly, but he should have been more productive with the Packers giving Owens so much attention.

Jason Witten – 5 Stars: Once again, Witten made the plays that put the Cowboys in position to score. He currently ranks third in the NFL with 20 receptions.

Pass Blocking – 3 Stars: Romo felt pressure in the first half and was sacked three times. The line did a better job in the second half, though the Cowboys were running quite a bit.

Run Blocking – 5 Stars: The line did a great job with run blocking, especially in the second half. The game offered some reminders of the 1990s Cowboys, especially when Barber was picking up eight yards, eight yards, eight yards, and so forth.

Role Players and Backups – 5 Stars: Felix Jones is amazing. He has had several runs where he nearly broke it for a long gain, and on his 60-yard run, he finally did. Miles Austin showed his speed on the two long receptions and gave opponents more reasons to be nervous about the Dallas attack.

Penalties – Offense – 5 Stars: The only two offensive penalties were intentional grounding on Tony Romo. Since I marked Romo down, I’ll give the offense as a whole full credit (though, to be fair, Andre Gurode was called for holding on a play where Romo was called for grounding).

Run Support – 5 Stars: Ryan Grant was really never a factor. The Packers’ longest run was nine yards. Brandon Jackson seemed to give Dallas more trouble, but he was not in the game very often.

Pass Rush – 5 Stars: Dallas recorded five sacks, including two by Anthony Henry. The defensive line along with DeMarcus Ware often generated pressure without additional blitzing, which is a good sign.

Tackling – 3 Stars: This is more of an impression vote, but there were too many instances were Packer runners were able to spin out of Dallas tackles.

Coverage – 4 Stars: Aaron Rodgers completed 22 of 37, but many of those passes were underneath the coverage. The only play where the Dallas coverage was completely blown was the 50-yard pass to Donald Driver in the third quarter. Mickey Spagnola blamed Pacman Jones. Josh Ellis (also employed by the Cowboys…) said it was Ken Hamlin’s fault. The cost? One star on an obscure blog.

Penalties – Defense – 5 Stars: Two defensive penalties, neither of which were costly, means that this was a five-star effort.

Nick Folk – 5 Stars: Folk remain perfect on the season. He has yet to record a touchback on a kickoff, but that is okay for now.

Mat McBriar – 4 Stars: McBriar had a beauty of a 65-yard punt, but he also shanked one.

Coverage Units – 5 Stars: The Packers only managed 16.2 yards per kickoff return, along with 6.0 yards per punt return.

Return Game – 3 Stars: Nothing bad happened in the return game, but there was nothing noteworthy. The Cowboys only managed 11 yards per kickoff return.

Penalties – 3 Stars: Three special teams penalties were avoidable. Every team has trouble with the illegal block in the back, etc., but these penalties should be minimized.

Cowboys 27, Packers 16: The Lambeau Curse is Over

[ratings]

[tags]Dallas Cowboys, Tony Romo, Marion Barber, Green Bay Packers[/tags]

Terrell Owens had two receptions for 17 yards. Tony Romo threw an interception in the end zone, thus killing a drive. Romo was also flagged twice for intentional grounding. And the offensive line gave up three sacks in the first half.

But thanks to some huge plays by a couple of reserves named Miles and Felix, along with hard running by the starter named Marion, the Cowboys pulled away from Green Bay to improve to 3-0 on the season. Since the other three NFC East teams also won today, tonight’s victory was even more important.

Pacman Jones still doesn’t have an interception, but he recovered a Ryan Grant fumble early and returned the ball to the Green Bay 14. The Cowboys couldn’t manage a first down and settled for a field goal.

Green Bay responded with a long drive that set up a field goal to tie the game. In response, the Cowboys moved deep into Packer territory and faced a 3rd-and-13. Romo made a bad pass over the middle, and it was picked off by Nick Collins, who returned it from the end zone all the way to the Dallas 43. The play led to another field goal.

Dallas struggled on its next possession, but the defense held the Packers. The Cowboys got the ball back with 7:53 left in the half and quickly moved the ball to the 40 thanks to two Barber runs and a pass to Owens. From the Dallas 40, Felix Jones found an opening on the left sideline and outran the Packer secondary for a 60-yard touchdown run. Dallas took a 10-6 lead with the play, and the Cowboys did not trail for the rest of the game. Another field goal before the half gave Dallas a 13-6 lead.

Green Bay cut the lead to 13-9 on the Packers’ first drive of the second half. On the next drive, the Cowboys had a 1st-and-10 from the Cowboy 34. Romo found Miles Austin on a post pattern that resulted in a 63-yard gain down to the Packer 3. The Cowboys scored two plays later to take a 20-9 lead.

Austin scored again a 52-yard touchdown pass with just over nine minutes left to blow the game open. The Cowboys’ offensive line wore down the Packer line, allowing Barber to eat up yards in the second half.

Stats and Such

* Barber had his first 100-yard game of the season, gaining 142 yards on 28 carries.
* Austin entered the game with 7 receptions for 88 yards during his career. He had two receptions for 115 yards and a touchdown against Green Bay.
* Before Patrick Crayton attempted a pass on an end-around in the first quarter of tonight’s game, the last non-quarterback to attempt a pass was Keyshawn Johnson in 2005.
* The last non-quarterback to complete a pass was Richie Anderson in 2004.
* Felix Jones’ 60-yard touchdown run was the team’s longest since 2006, when Julius Jones broke a 77-yarder against New Orleans.
* Barber’s longest career run: 54 yards vs. Chicago in 2007. It was not a touchdown.
* Patrick Crayton was shut out tonight and now has fewer yards this season (108) than Austin.

Cowboys vs. Packers: Preview and Live Blog

I am starting this live blog pretty early and will update it periodically. The game begins at 7:15 p.m. central time.

1967’s “Appointment with Destiny” and the Ice Bowl

[ratings]

[tags]dallas cowboys, green bay packers[/tags]

The title of the 1967 team highlight film for the Cowboys was “Appointment with Destiny,” even though the team’s destiny turned out to be a loss to the Packers in the Ice Bowl. Here is the final segment showing the highlights from the 1967 NFL Championship Game:

Below are some facts about the game, many of them borrowed from Ice Bowl: The Cold Truth About Football’s Most Unforgettable Game by Ed Gruver.

Realignment

By 1967, the NFL had 16 teams, including expansion teams in Dallas (1960), Minnesota (1961), Atlanta (1966), and New Orleans (1967). This led the league to add divisions to the Eastern and Western Conferences. Dallas fell in the Capitol Division along with New Orleans, Philadelphia, and Washington. The Packers were placed in the Central Division with Chicago, Detroit, and Minnesota.

Struggles During 1967

Both the Packers and the Cowboys struggled in 1967. Dallas jumped out to a 5-1 record but finished 4-4 to end with a 9-5 record. It was enough to qualify for the playoffs, along with the Rams, Packers, and Browns. Green Bay finished 9-4-1, which was a sharp drop-off from the 12-2 finish in 1966.

Playoffs

Realignment meant that the NFL would feature two divisional playoff games prior to the championship game. Many observers believed that this format would hurt the aging Packers because the team that would win it all had to play six preseason games, fourteen regular season games, and three playoff games. Dallas won its first ever playoff game by beating Cleveland in a 52-14 rout. The Packers were also dominant in a 28-7 win over Los Angeles

Green Bay Jumps Out to a Lead

Green Bay took a 14-0 lead on two touchdown passes from Bart Starr to Boyd Dowler. Dowler caught only five total touchdown passes during playoff games in his career, and three of those came against Dallas in 1966 and 1967. He had a total of four touchdown receptions during the regular season in 1967.

Andrie’s Fumble Recovery

Dallas found itself right back in the game when George Andrie recovered a Bart Starr fumble and returned it for a touchdown. Although Dallas had three defensive touchdowns in 1967, it was the first time all season that the Cowboys had returned a fumble for a score. Andrie had two previous defensive touchdowns, and the score against the Packers turned out to be the last of his career.

Danny Villanueva

Dallas cut the lead to 14-10 when Danny Villanueva kicked a 21-yard field goal in the second quarter. Villanueva had been less than impressive in 1967, making only 8 of 19 field goal attempts.

Dan Reeves to Lance Rentzel

The Cowboys took the lead in the fourth quarter thanks to a 50-yard pass from halfback Dan Reeves to Lance Rentzel. A few points about this:

* Until this play, Dallas had never led the Packers in any of the previous four meetings between the teams.
* This was Rentzel’s first playoff touchdown. He scored one other, though it came late in a blowout loss to Cleveland in 1969.
* Rentzel was second on the team with eight touchdown catches in 1967. Bob Hayes led the team with 10.
* Dan Reeves threw three career touchdown passes. All came in 1967. All were to Lance Rentzel.

Here is a diagram of the touchdown pass from Reeves to Rentzel:

Diagram: Reeves to Rentzel, 1967 NFL Championship Game

Diagram: Reeves to Rentzel, 1967 NFL Championship Game

Listen to the Ice Bowl

I’d rather watch the 1995 NFC Championship Game, but the original radio broadcast of the Ice Bowl is available through WTMJ in Wisconsin.

Episode 15 of Know Your Dallas Cowboys: The Show

In this episode of Know Your Dallas Cowboys: The Show, Gnome gets a bit emotional discussing the Cowboys’ win over Philadelphia. He sends his cousin, Dome, up to Green Bay to report about what people do for fun in Green Bay. As Dome discovers, people there just flock to Lambeau Field to look at it, even though they live four or five blocks away.

Episode 15 of Know Your Dallas Cowboys: The Show

In this episode of Know Your Dallas Cowboys: The Show, Gnome gets a bit emotional discussing the Cowboys’ win over Philadelphia. He sends his cousin, Dome, up to Green Bay to report about what people do for fun in Green Bay. As Dome discovers, people there just flock to Lambeau Field to look at it, even though they live four or five blocks away.

Better History: Cowboys vs. Packers at Milwaukee

The Cowboys have faced Green Bay ten times in Wisconsin. Five of these games have been played at Lambeau Field, including the Ice Bowl in 1967, and Dallas has lost all five. Of the five played at County Stadium in Milwaukee between 1965 and 1991, however, Dallas won three of five. Here is a history of those games played in Milwaukee:

Cowboys at Packers in Milwaukee

1965: Packers 13, Cowboys 3

The Packers entered the 1965 contest unbeaten and on their way to the first of three straight NFL titles, but Dallas made it tough on them. The game was tied at 3-3 until Dallas committed some mistakes deep in its own end, allowing the Packers to score 10 third quarter points. The teams combined for just 103 yards passing, but Dallas outgained the Packers 193 to 73 on the ground.

1972: Packers 16, Cowboys 13

The Cowboys had managed to beat the Packers for the first time in 1970, but when the teams met again two years later in Milwaukee, Green Bay prevailed again. Green Bay went on to qualify for the playoffs that season, but Dallas really beat itself with turnovers and boneheaded plays. Green Bay overcame a 13-10 second half deficit with two field goals to pull out the win.

1978: Cowboys 42, Packers 14

The Cowboys lost eight of their first nine against the Packers, but in 1978 at Milwaukee, it was all Dallas. The Cowboys had lost two straight and stood at 6-4, but the win began a six-game winning streak that lasted until Super Bowl XIII. Dallas rushed for a team record 313 yards in the win, with Tony Dorsett gaining 149 yards and Robert Newhouse picking up 101.

1980: Cowboys 28, Packers 7

In Danny White’s first season as the starter, the 2-1 Cowboys took care of business against the 1-2 Packers. White helped as much with his legs as a punter as with his arm as a passer, rushing 48 yards for a first down on a fake punt. The Milwaukee crowd started booing former-hero-turned-coach Bart Starr, who was in his third year as head coach.

1991: Cowboys 20, Packers 17

Ray Horton returned an interception 65 yards for a touchdown, and Emmitt Smith picked up 122 yards on 32 carries, as the Cowboys won the final matchup with the Packers at County Stadium. Jay Novacek had a big day as well, catching eleven passes for 121 yards.

The starting quarterback for the Packers in 1991 vs. the Cowboys? Blair Kiel. This game was noteworthy because it sparked an eight-game winning streak against Green Bay that lasted until 1997, when the Cowboys visited Lambeau Field.

Better History: Cowboys vs. Packers at Milwaukee

The Cowboys have faced Green Bay ten times in Wisconsin. Five of these games have been played at Lambeau Field, including the Ice Bowl in 1967, and Dallas has lost all five. Of the five played at County Stadium in Milwaukee between 1965 and 1991, however, Dallas won three of five. Here is a history of those games played in Milwaukee:

Cowboys at Packers in Milwaukee

1965: Packers 13, Cowboys 3

The Packers entered the 1965 contest unbeaten and on their way to the first of three straight NFL titles, but Dallas made it tough on them. The game was tied at 3-3 until Dallas committed some mistakes deep in its own end, allowing the Packers to score 10 third quarter points. The teams combined for just 103 yards passing, but Dallas outgained the Packers 193 to 73 on the ground.

1972: Packers 16, Cowboys 13

The Cowboys had managed to beat the Packers for the first time in 1970, but when the teams met again two years later in Milwaukee, Green Bay prevailed again. Green Bay went on to qualify for the playoffs that season, but Dallas really beat itself with turnovers and boneheaded plays. Green Bay overcame a 13-10 second half deficit with two field goals to pull out the win.

1978: Cowboys 42, Packers 14

The Cowboys lost eight of their first nine against the Packers, but in 1978 at Milwaukee, it was all Dallas. The Cowboys had lost two straight and stood at 6-4, but the win began a six-game winning streak that lasted until Super Bowl XIII. Dallas rushed for a team record 313 yards in the win, with Tony Dorsett gaining 149 yards and Robert Newhouse picking up 101.

1980: Cowboys 28, Packers 7

In Danny White’s first season as the starter, the 2-1 Cowboys took care of business against the 1-2 Packers. White helped as much with his legs as a punter as with his arm as a passer, rushing 48 yards for a first down on a fake punt. The Milwaukee crowd started booing former-hero-turned-coach Bart Starr, who was in his third year as head coach.

1991: Cowboys 20, Packers 17

Ray Horton returned an interception 65 yards for a touchdown, and Emmitt Smith picked up 122 yards on 32 carries, as the Cowboys won the final matchup with the Packers at County Stadium. Jay Novacek had a big day as well, catching eleven passes for 121 yards.

The starting quarterback for the Packers in 1991 vs. the Cowboys? Blair Kiel. This game was noteworthy because it sparked an eight-game winning streak against Green Bay that lasted until 1997, when the Cowboys visited Lambeau Field.