Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #72

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #72

Eight players have worn #72 for the Cowboys. This includes five defensive linemen and three offensive linemen.

Stephen Bowen, DE, Hofstra, 2006-present

Statistics: Bowen has recorded one sack and 10 tackles.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He will enter his third season in 2008.

Intangibles: Bowen saw quite a bit of action in 2007 as part of the rotation on defensive line. He finished fourth on the team in quarterback pressures.

Louis Cheek, OL, Texas A&M, 1990

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: The Cowboys signed Cheek as a Plan B free agent in 1990, but he lasted only part of the season.

Ray Childress, DT, Texas A&M, 1996

Statistics: Childress recorded one sack with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None with Dallas.

Longevity: He played part of one season with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Dallas signed Childress in 1996 to replace Leon Lett, who had been suspended. Childress was a legend in Houston, but he was not the same player with the Cowboys. He retired after the 1996 season.

Bill Herchman, DT, Texas Tech, 1960-61

Statistics: Herchman recovered two fumbles with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Dallas acquired Herchman via trade before the 1960 season, and he became a starter immediately. Dallas traded him to Houston before the 1962 season.

Ed Jones, DE, Tennessee State, 1974-78, 1980-89

Statistics: Jones officially recorded 57.5 sacks. Unofficially, he had 106.

Accolades: He was named to three Pro Bowls and one first-team All-Pro team.

Longevity: Jones played fifteen seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Too Tall was one of the great defensive linemen in team history. He was very good before taking a year off to become a boxer, and he seemed to become better when he returned to the team in 1980 after his boxing career failed. His height was good for more than his nickname; due to his size, many quarterbacks had difficulty throwing over him, and he probably had more career blocked passes than anyone else in history.

Tony Liscio, T, Tulsa, 1963-64, 1966-71

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played eight seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Liscio was the starting tackle for the Cowboys in many of the team’s greatest games. He was part of a trade in 1970 that brought Lance Alworth from San Diego, but he returned to Dallas in 1971 when Ralph Neely broke his leg in a motorcycle accident. Liscio’s final NFL game was Super Bowl VI.

Dwayne Missouri, DE, Northwestern, 2001

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Missouri saw action in three games in 2001.

Stephen Peterman, G, Louisiana State, 2005

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Peterman was part of the failure of a draft in 2004. He was taken in the third round that season, but he saw action in only three games with the Cowboys. He later played with the Lions.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #72.

Greatest #72

  • Ed Jones (97%, 127 Votes)
  • Tony Liscio (2%, 2 Votes)
  • Stephen Bowen (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Ray Childress (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Mike Sullivan (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Louis Cheek (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Bill Herchman (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Dwayne Missouri (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Stephen Peterman (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 131

Loading ... Loading ...

My Vote: Too Tall

Too Tall JonesAlong with Mark Tuinei and Bill Bates, Too Tall shares the team record for length of service. If it weren’t for his year in boxing, he might hold the record, but then again, he might not have been quite as effective as he was during the decade of the 1980s. He is often overlooked for how great he was, but few players in NFL history can claim 106 sacks.

Of the others, Liscio deserves a bit of consideration, but he did not contribute to the same extent that Jones did.

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #71

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #71

Eleven players have worn #71 for the Cowboys. This includes eight offensive linemen and three defensive linemen.

Note: This has been updated since its original posting to include Cory Proctor.

Paul Dickson, T, Baylor, 1960

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: He apparently earned the nickname “Suitcase” thanks to his large hands. He played one season in Dallas before being traded to Minnesota, where he was converted to defensive line and served as a backup for nearly a decade.

Mike Dwyer, DT, Massachusetts, 1987

Statistics: He recorded one sack with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played in all three replacement games in 1987.

Intangibles: None.

Andy Frederick, T, New Mexico, 1977-81

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played five seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Frederick backed up the likes of Ralph Neely, Rayfield Wright, Pat Donovan, and Jim Cooper. He played five seasons in Dallas before moving on to play for Cleveland and Chicago.

Charlie Granger, T, Southern, 1961

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played part of one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Granger played eight games for the Cowboys before Dallas traded him to St. Louis.

Alcender Jackson, G, Louisiana State, 2000-01

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played part of one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: He also saw action with the Green Bay Packers in 2002.

Cory Proctor, C/G, Montana, 2007-present

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Proctor was first signed in 2005, but he did not see action until 2007.

Intangibles: Proctor filled in ably for Andre Gurode and Leonard Davis in 2007.

Don Talbert, DE/OT, Texas, 1962, 1965, 1971

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Talbert played three seasons with the Cowboys in nonconsecutive years.

Intangibles: Dallas drafted Talbert in 1962, and he made the team as a rookie. He spent two seasons in Vietnam, and then returned to the Cowboys in 1965. He was selected in two expansion drafts– first by Atlanta in 1966, and then by New Orleans in 1969. He returned to the Cowboys in 1971 as a backup.

Willie Townes, DE, Tulsa, 1966-68

Statistics: Townes recorded one safety and scored a touchdown on a fumble recovery.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played three seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Townes was drafted in 1966 and became a starter that season. In fact, he started both NFL Championship Games against Green Bay, and it was his hit on Bart Starr in the Ice Bowl that led to George Andrie’s fumble recovery for a touchdown. However, he was injured in 1968, and after returning out of shape in 1970, he was traded to New Orleans.

Mark Tuinei, OT/DL, Hawaii, 1983-97

Statistics: He recorded one sack as a defensive lineman.

Accolades: He was named to two Pro Bowls.

Longevity: Tuinei played fifteen seasons with the Cowboys, tying a team record.

Intangibles: He began his career as a free agent defensive tackle, but he successfully made the transition to offensive line starting in 1985. He became a starter in 1987 and was the team’s left tackle in each of the Super Bowl wins of the 1990s.

Rodney Wallace, G/T, New Mexico, 1971-73

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played three seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Wallace was a backup for three seasons at both guard and tackle.

Tyson Walter, OL, Ohio State, 2002-04

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played three seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Walter saw quite a bit of time at center as a rookie in 2002, but he was primarily a backup in 2003 and 2004. He played for the Packers and Redskins in 2006.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #71.

Greatest #71

  • Mark Tuinei (91%, 84 Votes)
  • Don Talbert (2%, 2 Votes)
  • Willie Townes (2%, 2 Votes)
  • Tyson Walter (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Cory Proctor (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Andy Frederick (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Mike Dwyer (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Alcender Jackson (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Charlie Granger (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Rodney Wallace (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Paul Dickson (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 92

Loading ... Loading ...

My Vote: Tuinei

Mark TuineiThis was is really no contest. Tuinei was a mainstay on the Cowboys for the same length of time that Bill Bates was, and his steady play at left tackle was vitally important during the Super Bowl runs of the 1990s. His death in 1999 was tragic and still difficult to believe, even nearly 10 years later. But he left a solid legacy as one of the great players for the organization.

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #71

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #71

Eleven players have worn #71 for the Cowboys. This includes eight offensive linemen and three defensive linemen.

Note: This has been updated since its original posting to include Cory Proctor.

Paul Dickson, T, Baylor, 1960

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: He apparently earned the nickname “Suitcase” thanks to his large hands. He played one season in Dallas before being traded to Minnesota, where he was converted to defensive line and served as a backup for nearly a decade.

Mike Dwyer, DT, Massachusetts, 1987

Statistics: He recorded one sack with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played in all three replacement games in 1987.

Intangibles: None.

Andy Frederick, T, New Mexico, 1977-81

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played five seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Frederick backed up the likes of Ralph Neely, Rayfield Wright, Pat Donovan, and Jim Cooper. He played five seasons in Dallas before moving on to play for Cleveland and Chicago.

Charlie Granger, T, Southern, 1961

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played part of one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Granger played eight games for the Cowboys before Dallas traded him to St. Louis.

Alcender Jackson, G, Louisiana State, 2000-01

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played part of one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: He also saw action with the Green Bay Packers in 2002.

Cory Proctor, C/G, Montana, 2007-present

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Proctor was first signed in 2005, but he did not see action until 2007.

Intangibles: Proctor filled in ably for Andre Gurode and Leonard Davis in 2007.

Don Talbert, DE/OT, Texas, 1962, 1965, 1971

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Talbert played three seasons with the Cowboys in nonconsecutive years.

Intangibles: Dallas drafted Talbert in 1962, and he made the team as a rookie. He spent two seasons in Vietnam, and then returned to the Cowboys in 1965. He was selected in two expansion drafts– first by Atlanta in 1966, and then by New Orleans in 1969. He returned to the Cowboys in 1971 as a backup.

Willie Townes, DE, Tulsa, 1966-68

Statistics: Townes recorded one safety and scored a touchdown on a fumble recovery.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played three seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Townes was drafted in 1966 and became a starter that season. In fact, he started both NFL Championship Games against Green Bay, and it was his hit on Bart Starr in the Ice Bowl that led to George Andrie’s fumble recovery for a touchdown. However, he was injured in 1968, and after returning out of shape in 1970, he was traded to New Orleans.

Mark Tuinei, OT/DL, Hawaii, 1983-97

Statistics: He recorded one sack as a defensive lineman.

Accolades: He was named to two Pro Bowls.

Longevity: Tuinei played fifteen seasons with the Cowboys, tying a team record.

Intangibles: He began his career as a free agent defensive tackle, but he successfully made the transition to offensive line starting in 1985. He became a starter in 1987 and was the team’s left tackle in each of the Super Bowl wins of the 1990s.

Rodney Wallace, G/T, New Mexico, 1971-73

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played three seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Wallace was a backup for three seasons at both guard and tackle.

Tyson Walter, OL, Ohio State, 2002-04

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played three seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Walter saw quite a bit of time at center as a rookie in 2002, but he was primarily a backup in 2003 and 2004. He played for the Packers and Redskins in 2006.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #71.

Greatest #71

  • Mark Tuinei (91%, 84 Votes)
  • Don Talbert (2%, 2 Votes)
  • Willie Townes (2%, 2 Votes)
  • Tyson Walter (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Cory Proctor (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Andy Frederick (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Mike Dwyer (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Alcender Jackson (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Charlie Granger (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Rodney Wallace (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Paul Dickson (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 92

Loading ... Loading ...

My Vote: Tuinei

Mark TuineiThis was is really no contest. Tuinei was a mainstay on the Cowboys for the same length of time that Bill Bates was, and his steady play at left tackle was vitally important during the Super Bowl runs of the 1990s. His death in 1999 was tragic and still difficult to believe, even nearly 10 years later. But he left a solid legacy as one of the great players for the organization.

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #70

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #70

Nine players have worn #70 for the Cowboys. This includes seven offensive linemen and two defensive linemen.

Javier Collins, DT/T, Northwestern, 2002-03

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: The Cowboys signed Collins in 2001 as a free agent, and he started several games in 2002. However, he seldom saw action in 2003 with Dallas and moved on to Cleveland in 2004.

Leonard Davis, G, Texas, 2007-

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: He made the Pro Bowl in 2007.

Longevity: He will enter his second season with Dallas in 2008.

Intangibles: Davis appeared to be a bust in Arizona, but he has found new life in Dallas. He made the Pro Bowl as a guard in 2007.

Dale Hellestrae, OL, Southern Methodist, 1990-00

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played 11 seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Hellestrae is easily the most recognizable deep-snapper in team history.

Bob McCreary, T, Wake Forest, 1961

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: The Cowboys signed McCreary as a free agent in 1961, and he saw action as a backup. He was released following his only season as a pro.

Dale Memmelaar, G, Wyoming, 1962-63

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: The Cowboys picked up Memmelaar off of waivers in 1962, and he became a starter for two seasons before being released.

Howard Richards, G/T, Missouri, 1981-86

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played six seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Of 46 first-round picks in team history, only two have been offensive linemen. One was Robert Shaw in 1979. The other was Howard Richards. Richards saw quite a bit of action early in his career as a replacement starter and as a messenger guard. However, he lost his shot to become a full-time starter to Phil Pozderac in 1984. After that, injuries took their toll on Richards, who was gone from the Cowboys by 1987.

Bill Sandeman, DT, Pacific, 1966

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Sandeman was signed as a free agent in 1965, but an injury caused him to miss the entire season. He dressed for several games in 1966 but was mostly a backup. He later played several seasons with Atlanta.

Bob White, OL, Rhode Island, 1987-89

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played three seasons with Dallas.

Intangibles: White is something of an anomaly. He was originally signed as a replacement player in 1987, and he was one of the few players that Dallas kept on the roster after the strike ended. He remained on the roster and even survived the firing of Tom Landry and the hiring of Jimmy Johnson. However, after playing in about half of the games in 1989, he was gone from the league.

Rayfield Wright, T/TE, Fort Valley State, 1967-79

Statistics: As a tight end, Wright caught two career passes.

Accolades: He was named to six Pro Bowls and three first-team All-Pro teams. He is a member of the Ring of Honor and the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Longevity: He played 13 seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Wright was a defensive lineman in college who tried to convert to tight end early in his career. He converted to offensive line full time in 1970, and he became one of the best tackles in league history.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #70.

Greatest #70

  • Rayfield Wright (93%, 114 Votes)
  • Bob White (4%, 5 Votes)
  • Leonard Davis (2%, 3 Votes)
  • Howard Richards (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Dale Hellestrae (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Dale Memmelear (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Bob McCreary (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Bill Sandeman (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Sam Wilder (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Javier Collins (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 123

Loading ... Loading ...

My Vote: Wright

Rayfield WrightThere is simply no question about this one. Of all of the great lineman in team history, Wright ranks right next to Larry Allen as one of the two best. His selection into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2006 was far past due but richly deserved. A website known as American Rhetoric has a transcript of his Hall of Fame speech along with a video of his speech. Here is an audio version of it:

[audio:http://www.americanrhetoric.com/mp3clips/sportsspeeches/rayfieldwrighthalloffame1212222.mp3]

A few younger fans may go with Davis, but Leonard needs to repeat his 2007 performance many times over before he can match Wright. Hellestrae is a memorable player in team history largely because we never had to worry about bad snaps on punt or field goals for nearly a decade.

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #70

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #70

Nine players have worn #70 for the Cowboys. This includes seven offensive linemen and two defensive linemen.

Javier Collins, DT/T, Northwestern, 2002-03

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: The Cowboys signed Collins in 2001 as a free agent, and he started several games in 2002. However, he seldom saw action in 2003 with Dallas and moved on to Cleveland in 2004.

Leonard Davis, G, Texas, 2007-

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: He made the Pro Bowl in 2007.

Longevity: He will enter his second season with Dallas in 2008.

Intangibles: Davis appeared to be a bust in Arizona, but he has found new life in Dallas. He made the Pro Bowl as a guard in 2007.

Dale Hellestrae, OL, Southern Methodist, 1990-00

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played 11 seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Hellestrae is easily the most recognizable deep-snapper in team history.

Bob McCreary, T, Wake Forest, 1961

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: The Cowboys signed McCreary as a free agent in 1961, and he saw action as a backup. He was released following his only season as a pro.

Dale Memmelaar, G, Wyoming, 1962-63

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: The Cowboys picked up Memmelaar off of waivers in 1962, and he became a starter for two seasons before being released.

Howard Richards, G/T, Missouri, 1981-86

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played six seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Of 46 first-round picks in team history, only two have been offensive linemen. One was Robert Shaw in 1979. The other was Howard Richards. Richards saw quite a bit of action early in his career as a replacement starter and as a messenger guard. However, he lost his shot to become a full-time starter to Phil Pozderac in 1984. After that, injuries took their toll on Richards, who was gone from the Cowboys by 1987.

Bill Sandeman, DT, Pacific, 1966

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Sandeman was signed as a free agent in 1965, but an injury caused him to miss the entire season. He dressed for several games in 1966 but was mostly a backup. He later played several seasons with Atlanta.

Bob White, OL, Rhode Island, 1987-89

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played three seasons with Dallas.

Intangibles: White is something of an anomaly. He was originally signed as a replacement player in 1987, and he was one of the few players that Dallas kept on the roster after the strike ended. He remained on the roster and even survived the firing of Tom Landry and the hiring of Jimmy Johnson. However, after playing in about half of the games in 1989, he was gone from the league.

Rayfield Wright, T/TE, Fort Valley State, 1967-79

Statistics: As a tight end, Wright caught two career passes.

Accolades: He was named to six Pro Bowls and three first-team All-Pro teams. He is a member of the Ring of Honor and the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Longevity: He played 13 seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Wright was a defensive lineman in college who tried to convert to tight end early in his career. He converted to offensive line full time in 1970, and he became one of the best tackles in league history.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #70.

Greatest #70

  • Rayfield Wright (93%, 114 Votes)
  • Bob White (4%, 5 Votes)
  • Leonard Davis (2%, 3 Votes)
  • Howard Richards (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Dale Hellestrae (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Dale Memmelear (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Bob McCreary (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Bill Sandeman (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Sam Wilder (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Javier Collins (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 123

Loading ... Loading ...

My Vote: Wright

Rayfield WrightThere is simply no question about this one. Of all of the great lineman in team history, Wright ranks right next to Larry Allen as one of the two best. His selection into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2006 was far past due but richly deserved. A website known as American Rhetoric has a transcript of his Hall of Fame speech along with a video of his speech. Here is an audio version of it:

[audio:http://www.americanrhetoric.com/mp3clips/sportsspeeches/rayfieldwrighthalloffame1212222.mp3]

A few younger fans may go with Davis, but Leonard needs to repeat his 2007 performance many times over before he can match Wright. Hellestrae is a memorable player in team history largely because we never had to worry about bad snaps on punt or field goals for nearly a decade.

Recap: Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers, Nos. 1-69

I will continue with the Greatest Players by Number Series this evening, but for now, here is a recap of the voting for numbers 1 through 69.

#

Total

Votes

Players Name Pos. Years
1 217 5 Mat McBriar (60%) P 2004-present
2 88 3 Lin Elliott (65%) K 1992-1993
3 116 5 Billy Cundiff (29%) K 2002-2005
4 112 6 Mike Saxon (76%) P 1985-1992
5 86 2 Clint Stoerner (80%) QB 2000-2002
6 115 3 Nick Folk (92%) K 2007-present
7 196 6 Steve Beuerlein (69%) QB 1991-1992
8 152 2 Troy Aikman (92%) QB 1989-2000
9 182 4 Tony Romo (98%) QB 2003-present
10 111 8 Ron Widby (76%) P 1968-1971
11 237 9 Danny White (95%) QB/P 1976-1988
12 202 2 Roger Staubach (96%) QB 1969-1979
13 134 2 Jerry Rhome (87%) QB 1965-1968
14 178 5 Craig Morton (74%) QB 1965-1974
15 144 4 Toni Fritsch (76%) K 1971-1973, 1975
16 141 4 Vinny Testaverde (65%) QB 2004
17 202 5 Don Meredith (88%) QB 1960-1968
18 137 7 Chris Boniol (64%) K 1994-1996
19 183 8 Lance Rentzel (36%) WR 1967-1970
20 193 11 Mel Renfro (88%) DB 1964-1977
21 245 10 Deion Sanders (96%) DB 1995-1999
22 244 7 Emmitt Smith (89%) RB 1990-2002
23 79 12 Robert Williams (38%) DB 1987-1993
24 110 10 Everson Walls (82%) DB 1981-1989
25 82 15 Pat Watkins (35%) DB 2006-present
26 185 10 Kevin Smith (30%) DB 1992-1999
27 167 12 Ron Fellows (38%) DB 1981-1986
28 218 5 Darren Woodson (99%) DB 1992-2003
29 202 10 Kenneth Gant (61%) DB 1990-1994
30 115 10 Dan Reeves (76%) RB 1965-1972
31 180 12 Roy Williams (64%) S 2002-present
32 161 10 Walt Garrison (65%) RB 1966-1974
33 190 11 Tony Dorsett (95%) RB 1977-1987
34 194 10 Herschel Walker (56%) RB 1986-89, 1996-97
35 153 12 Calvin Hill (90%) RB 1969-1974
36 73 9 Vince Albritton (44%) S 1984-1991
37 106 9 James Washington (93%) S 1990-1994
38 75 7 Sam Baker (44%) P/K 1962-1963
39 62 6 Lousaka Polite (55%) RB 2004-2006
40 187 6 Bill Bates (99%) S 1983-1997
41 216 8 Charlie Waters (78%) DB 1970-78, 1980-81
42 125 13 Anthony Henry (65%) CB 2005-present
43 142 5 Cliff Harris (77%) S 1970-1979
44 126 7 Robert Newhouse (95%) FB 1972-1983
45 66 8 Manny Hendrix (55%) DB 1986-1991
46 115 9 Mark Washington (67%) CB 1970-1978
47 115 6 Dexter Clinkscale (69%) S 1980-1985
48 103 3 Daryl Johnston (99%) FB 1989-1999
49 47 2 Brett Pierce (56%) TE 2004-2005
*49 n/a 1 Tom Landry Coach 1960-1988
50 118 11 D.D. Lewis (77%) LB 1968, 1970-81
51 130 11 Ken Norton (81%) LB 1988-1993
52 169 11 Dexter Coakley (79%) LB 1997-2004
53 110 12 Mark Stepnoski (60%) C 1989-94, 1999-01
54 149 9 Randy White (90%) DT 1975-1988
55 127 12 Lee Roy Jordan (87%) LB 1963-1976
56 131 13 Eugene Lockhart (42%) LB 1984-1990
57 100 13 Kevin Burnett (64%) LB 2005-present
58 104 9 Mike Hegman (63%) LB 1976-1987
59 88 9 Dat Nguyen (83%) LB 1999-2005
60 71 14 Derek Kennard (59%) C/G 1994-1996
61 109 6 Nate Newton (92%) G/T 1986-1998
62 91 11 John Fitzgerald (92%) C 1971-1980
63 124 11 Larry Cole (85%) DE/DT 1968-1980
64 137 8 Tom Rafferty (98%) C/G 1976-1989
65 109 7 Andre Gurode (97%) C/G 2002-present
66 87 11 George Andrie (66%) DE 1962-1972
67 67 12 Pat Donovan (52%) T 1975-1983
68 76 11 Herb Scott (87%) G 1975-1984
69 27 2 George Hegamin (89%) T 1994-1997

Recap: Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers, Nos. 1-69

I will continue with the Greatest Players by Number Series this evening, but for now, here is a recap of the voting for numbers 1 through 69.

#

Total

Votes

Players Name Pos. Years
1 217 5 Mat McBriar (60%) P 2004-present
2 88 3 Lin Elliott (65%) K 1992-1993
3 116 5 Billy Cundiff (29%) K 2002-2005
4 112 6 Mike Saxon (76%) P 1985-1992
5 86 2 Clint Stoerner (80%) QB 2000-2002
6 115 3 Nick Folk (92%) K 2007-present
7 196 6 Steve Beuerlein (69%) QB 1991-1992
8 152 2 Troy Aikman (92%) QB 1989-2000
9 182 4 Tony Romo (98%) QB 2003-present
10 111 8 Ron Widby (76%) P 1968-1971
11 237 9 Danny White (95%) QB/P 1976-1988
12 202 2 Roger Staubach (96%) QB 1969-1979
13 134 2 Jerry Rhome (87%) QB 1965-1968
14 178 5 Craig Morton (74%) QB 1965-1974
15 144 4 Toni Fritsch (76%) K 1971-1973, 1975
16 141 4 Vinny Testaverde (65%) QB 2004
17 202 5 Don Meredith (88%) QB 1960-1968
18 137 7 Chris Boniol (64%) K 1994-1996
19 183 8 Lance Rentzel (36%) WR 1967-1970
20 193 11 Mel Renfro (88%) DB 1964-1977
21 245 10 Deion Sanders (96%) DB 1995-1999
22 244 7 Emmitt Smith (89%) RB 1990-2002
23 79 12 Robert Williams (38%) DB 1987-1993
24 110 10 Everson Walls (82%) DB 1981-1989
25 82 15 Pat Watkins (35%) DB 2006-present
26 185 10 Kevin Smith (30%) DB 1992-1999
27 167 12 Ron Fellows (38%) DB 1981-1986
28 218 5 Darren Woodson (99%) DB 1992-2003
29 202 10 Kenneth Gant (61%) DB 1990-1994
30 115 10 Dan Reeves (76%) RB 1965-1972
31 180 12 Roy Williams (64%) S 2002-present
32 161 10 Walt Garrison (65%) RB 1966-1974
33 190 11 Tony Dorsett (95%) RB 1977-1987
34 194 10 Herschel Walker (56%) RB 1986-89, 1996-97
35 153 12 Calvin Hill (90%) RB 1969-1974
36 73 9 Vince Albritton (44%) S 1984-1991
37 106 9 James Washington (93%) S 1990-1994
38 75 7 Sam Baker (44%) P/K 1962-1963
39 62 6 Lousaka Polite (55%) RB 2004-2006
40 187 6 Bill Bates (99%) S 1983-1997
41 216 8 Charlie Waters (78%) DB 1970-78, 1980-81
42 125 13 Anthony Henry (65%) CB 2005-present
43 142 5 Cliff Harris (77%) S 1970-1979
44 126 7 Robert Newhouse (95%) FB 1972-1983
45 66 8 Manny Hendrix (55%) DB 1986-1991
46 115 9 Mark Washington (67%) CB 1970-1978
47 115 6 Dexter Clinkscale (69%) S 1980-1985
48 103 3 Daryl Johnston (99%) FB 1989-1999
49 47 2 Brett Pierce (56%) TE 2004-2005
*49 n/a 1 Tom Landry Coach 1960-1988
50 118 11 D.D. Lewis (77%) LB 1968, 1970-81
51 130 11 Ken Norton (81%) LB 1988-1993
52 169 11 Dexter Coakley (79%) LB 1997-2004
53 110 12 Mark Stepnoski (60%) C 1989-94, 1999-01
54 149 9 Randy White (90%) DT 1975-1988
55 127 12 Lee Roy Jordan (87%) LB 1963-1976
56 131 13 Eugene Lockhart (42%) LB 1984-1990
57 100 13 Kevin Burnett (64%) LB 2005-present
58 104 9 Mike Hegman (63%) LB 1976-1987
59 88 9 Dat Nguyen (83%) LB 1999-2005
60 71 14 Derek Kennard (59%) C/G 1994-1996
61 109 6 Nate Newton (92%) G/T 1986-1998
62 91 11 John Fitzgerald (92%) C 1971-1980
63 124 11 Larry Cole (85%) DE/DT 1968-1980
64 137 8 Tom Rafferty (98%) C/G 1976-1989
65 109 7 Andre Gurode (97%) C/G 2002-present
66 87 11 George Andrie (66%) DE 1962-1972
67 67 12 Pat Donovan (52%) T 1975-1983
68 76 11 Herb Scott (87%) G 1975-1984
69 27 2 George Hegamin (89%) T 1994-1997

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #69

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #69

Two players, both offensive linemen, have worn #69 for the Cowboys.

George Hegamin, T, North Carolina State, 1994-97

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played four seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Hegamin was mostly a backup, but he saw quite a bit of action in 1997 when Mark Tuinei went down with an injury. Hegamin was not bad at run blocking, but he was not good at pass blocking. For this reason, the Cowboys moved Larry Allen to left tackle on obvious passing downs.

Ross Tucker, G, Princeton, 2002

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played less than a full season with Dallas.

Intangibles: The Cowboys signed Tucker in 2002, and he filled in for an injured Larry Allen that season. He also played for the Bills, Redskins, and Patriots. He now shows off his Princeton education by writing for Sports Illustrated.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #69.

Greatest #69

  • George Hegamin (91%, 39 Votes)
  • Ross Tucker (9%, 4 Votes)

Total Voters: 43

Loading ... Loading ...

My Vote: Hegamin

George HegaminIt’s been a while since we’ve had such a poor (and shallow) selection of players. Hegamin was a member of one Super Bowl team and was a capable backup for quite a bit longer than Tucker. Though Hegamin was not very effective as a starter, he contributed much more to the franchise than Tucker did. Thus, I’m going with Hegamin here.

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #69

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #69

Two players, both offensive linemen, have worn #69 for the Cowboys.

George Hegamin, T, North Carolina State, 1994-97

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played four seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Hegamin was mostly a backup, but he saw quite a bit of action in 1997 when Mark Tuinei went down with an injury. Hegamin was not bad at run blocking, but he was not good at pass blocking. For this reason, the Cowboys moved Larry Allen to left tackle on obvious passing downs.

Ross Tucker, G, Princeton, 2002

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played less than a full season with Dallas.

Intangibles: The Cowboys signed Tucker in 2002, and he filled in for an injured Larry Allen that season. He also played for the Bills, Redskins, and Patriots. He now shows off his Princeton education by writing for Sports Illustrated.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #69.

Greatest #69

  • George Hegamin (91%, 39 Votes)
  • Ross Tucker (9%, 4 Votes)

Total Voters: 43

Loading ... Loading ...

My Vote: Hegamin

George HegaminIt’s been a while since we’ve had such a poor (and shallow) selection of players. Hegamin was a member of one Super Bowl team and was a capable backup for quite a bit longer than Tucker. Though Hegamin was not very effective as a starter, he contributed much more to the franchise than Tucker did. Thus, I’m going with Hegamin here.

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #68

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #68

Eleven players have worn #68 for the Cowboys. This includes five defensive linemen and six offensive linemen.

Michael Batiste, DT, Tulane, 1995

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played less than one full season with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Batiste made the team in 1995 but was only active for a handful of games. He played defensive tackle for the Cowboys but later played offensive line for the Redskins.

Jim Boeke, T, Heidelberg, 1964-67

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played four seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: The Cowboys acquired Boeke in 1964, and he became a starter by the end of that season. He eventually lost his job to Tony Liscio. He committed a rather infamous penalty in the 1966 NFL Championship Game by jumping before the snap when the Cowboys had the ball on the Packer one-yard-line.

Frank Cornish, C, UCLA, 1992-94

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played three seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Cornish was Troy Aikman’s center at UCLA and was a backup with the Cowboys. He started a few games in relief of Mark Stepnoski.

Update (8/24/08): Cornish tragically died at the age of 40 in his Southlake home. Here is more.

Doug Free, OT, N. Illinois, 2007-present

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Free enters his second season with Dallas in 2008.

Intangibles: Free was a fourth-round pick in 2007 but has seldom seen action thus far.

Thomas Johnson, DT, Middle Tennessee State, 2005

Statistics: Johnson recorded one tackle with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played less than one full season with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Johnson saw very limited action with Dallas in 2005.

Crawford Ker, G, Florida, 1985-90

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played six seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Ker was a solid starter during the mid- to late-1980s, but he fell out of favor with Jimmy Johnson. He left via free agency in 1991. According to this story, he has managed a WingHouse restaurant in Florida.

Matt Lehr, C/G, Virgina Tech, 2001-04

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played four seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Lehr at one point earned a spot as the starting center for the Cowboys. He later started for Atlanta and played in 2007 with Tampa Bay. He has more recently been caught up in a steroid scandal.

Guy Reese, DT, Southern Methodist, 1962-63

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Reese played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: A native of Dallas, he was a drafted by both the Dallas Cowboys and the Dallas Texans. However, he was traded to Baltimore after two seasons.

Oliver Ross, T, Iowa State, 1998

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Ross was a fifth-round pick in 1998 but seldom played. He was later a starter with Pittsburgh and Arizona.

Noel Scarlett, DT, Langston, 2000

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Scarlett was picked up in 2000 as a free agent, but he made the active roster only once.

Herbert Scott, G, Virginia Union, 1975-84

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: He made three Pro Bowls and was named to two All-Pro teams.

Longevity: Scott played ten seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Scott was part of both the Dirty Dozen of the 1975 draft and became a starter in 1976. He was great at both open-field blocks and at pass blocking. Injuries slowed him up towards the end of his career, when he saw action at tackle.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #68.

Greatest #68

  • Herbert Scott (83%, 90 Votes)
  • Crawford Ker (5%, 5 Votes)
  • Matt Lehr (4%, 4 Votes)
  • Frank Cornish (3%, 3 Votes)
  • Doug Free (2%, 2 Votes)
  • Oliver Ross (2%, 2 Votes)
  • Jim Boeke (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Noel Scarlett (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Thomas Johnson (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Guy Reese (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Michael Batiste (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 108

Loading ... Loading ...

My Vote: Scott

Herb ScottFor this series, Scott is the last of the “Four Irishmen and a Scott,” consisting of Scott, John Fitzgerald, Jim Cooper, Pat Donovan, and Tom Rafferty. He was one of the top guards in the game during the late 1970s, and he just as talented as two guards who preceded him: John Niland and Blaine Nye.

Ker was not a bad player, but he was nothing compared to Scott. Lehr started for one season but was quickly replaced by Al Johnson in 2004.