Preseason Game #2: Broncos 23, Cowboys 13

Cowboys Broncos

Box Score

Recap (Yahoo!)

Game Summary

The Cowboys’ defense had a tough time slowing down the Denver offense early in tonight’s game, as the Cowboys lost to the Broncos, 23-13.

Dallas fell behind 7-0 when Denver moved the ball 65 yards in nine plays, capped off by a one-yard touchdown run by Andre Hall. Dallas moved the ball into Denver territory on the Cowboys’ first possession, but Dallas was forced to punt.

Denver got the ball deep in its own territory with about three minutes to play in the first quarter, and it appeared as if Dallas had stopped Denver. However, an unnecessary roughness penalty on Bradie James kept the drive going for the Broncos, who then marched down field and completed a 90-yard drive when Jay Cutler hit Brandon Marshall on a three-yard touchdown pass. That gave Denver a 14-0 lead, and Dallas struggled to catch up for the rest of the game.

The star of the game for Dallas was Miles Austin, who on one drive late in the first half caught two big-time passes from backup quarterback Brad Johnson. One reception went for 37 yards on a third-and-four from the Denver 46. The second was a five-yard touchdown reception where Austin outjumped Denver defensive back Domonique Foxworth. The score cut the Denver lead to 14-7 at the half.

Austin suffered a knee injury, however, and missed the rest of the game.

Johnson led Dallas to a field goal early in the third quarter, and then Richard Bartel took over. The offense looked quite lackluster during Bartel’s first few series, but several backups stepped up in the fourth quarter. Tight end Rodney Hannah caught four passes, while running back Keon Lattimore (brother of Ravens’ linebacker Ray Lewis) made a few good runs.

With Dallas trailing 20-13, the Cowboys moved deep into Denver territory. Facing a 4th-and-5 from the Denver 10 with 2:29 remaining in the game, Bartel tried to get the ball to Danny Amendola. However, Amendola made one too many moves and turned the wrong way. Denver’s Jack Williams picked off the pass and would have run it back for a touchdown if it weren’t for a last-second tackle by Bartel.

The offensive skill players played about a quarter and a half. Tony Romo completed six of nine passes for 33 yards. Terrell Owens had three receptions for 20 yards, while Jason Witten went without a catch. Marion Barber carried five times for 22 yards.

Bullet-Pointed Game Notes

1st Quarter

Special Teams (15:00)

* Special teams missed several tackles on the opening kickoff. Andre Hall returned the kickoff 32 yards.

Dallas Defense (14:53)

* Mike Jenkins slipped on an out-and-up, allowing Eddie Royal to catch a 35-yard pass.

* Zach Thomas had two solid plays inside the red zone on Denver’s first series.

* Jay Cutler started the game going 5-for-5 for 61 yards.

* Overall, the Dallas defense looked weak to open the game. Denver scored on an Andre Hall run.

Special Teams (9:43)

* Isaiah Stanback had a great return after the Denver touchdown, taking it back 35 yards.

Dallas Offense (9:36)

* Terrell Owens caught his first passes of the preseason, including one on a 3rd-and-4 play.

* Marion Barber had a couple of nice plays, including an 11-yard run to get a first down in Denver territory.

* Dallas had three penalties on the first drive.

Dallas Defense (3:49)

* There’s a commercial for a “new spirit” at Albertson’s. I think this is the third straight season that there’s been this new spirit, because I think it is exactly the same commercial.

* Denver was hit by the penalty bug on its second offensive series, getting hit with three flags on three consecutive plays.

* Dallas give up a first down on 3rd-and-16 when Bradie James was called for unnecessary roughness.

* It looked like Dallas was tackling a little bit better, but three Cowboys (Thomas, Roy Williams, Tank Johnson) missed a tackle up the middle on Andre Hall.

End of First Quarter: Denver 7, Dallas 0

Second Quarter

Dallas Defense (15:00)

* Eddie Royal made a very impressive play on the first play of the second quarter, catching a pass for 32 yards. It looked as if Anthony Henry would intercept the pass.

* Denver walked right over the Cowboys on this drive. Jay Cutler hit Brandon Marshall on a three-yard touchdown.

* On two drives, Cutler has gone 9-for-9 for 120 yards and a touchdown.

Offense (12:56)

* Tony Curtis caught a pass early in the second quarter. He looked good in preseason last year, and it does not look as if Martellus Bennett is ready to contribute just yet.

* Romo missed Sam Hurd on a deep pass on a 3rd-and-4. The play would have gone for a touchdown.

Special Teams (11:37)

* Mike Jenkins made a good tackle on a punt return.

Defense (11:28)

* Dallas is not looking good against the pass or the run. Cutler completed his first 12 passes; however, Bradie James knocked down a pass on 3rd-and-5.

Special Teams (7:20)

* Danny Amendola lined up to return the first Denver punt of the game, but the punt was a touchback.

Offense (7:08)

* Brad Johnson came in the game midway through the second quarter.

* First play with Johnson: a reverse to Miles Austin, which lost three yards.

* Felix Jones’ first play: 11 yard run off right tackle. However, he was called for tripping on a 3rd down play, negating a first-down pass from Johnson to Deon Anderson.

* As of 5:36 of the 2nd quarter:

First Downs: Denver 12, Dallas 3
Total Yards: Denver 196, Dallas 63

Defense (5:36)

* The Dallas starters on defense remained in the game.

* Marcus Spears had a nice tackle on a second down play.

* Jay Ratliff made a nice stop on Selmon Young on a 3rd-and-12.

Special Teams (4:07)

* Pacman Jones nearly broke a punt return, going 24 yards. However, he was penalized for delay of game for spiking the ball.

Offense (3:53)

* The offensive line played most of the first half. The skill players did not.

* Miles Austin made a great catch just after the two minute warning. It went for 37 yards. Brad Johnson underthrew the ball, but Austin reached behind Domonique Foxworth to get the pass.

* Austin made another catch on a five-yard touchdown, outjumping Foxworth to get the ball.

Special Teams (1:37)

* Sam Hurd made a great tackle on Andre Hall on the kickoff following the Dallas touchdown.

Defense (1:32)

* The Cowboys put in their backups at the end of the second quarter. Denver left its starters for the entire half.

* Denver moved the ball to get into field goal position late. However, Matt Prater missed a 49-yard field goal attempt.

Halftime: Denver 14, Dallas 7

3rd Quarter

Offense (15:00)

* Brad Johnson remained in the game to start the second half.

* Felix Jones made a very nice catch-and-run on the first play of the third quarter, thanks largely to a block by Julius Crosslin. The play went 27 yards.

* Martellus Bennett caught an 11-yard pass.

* Nick Folk made a 42-yard fielg goal to cap off the opening drive of the second half.

* The sideline reporter just said that Miles Austin suffered a knee sprain shortly after catching his touchdown pass during the first quarter. Chris Canty suffered a minor injury in the first half, but he seems fine.

Final stats: Brad Johnson: 9/12, 114 yards, 1 TD

Special Teams (10:31)

* Bennett made tackle on the kickoff following the Folk field goal.

Defense (10:26)

* The Broncos’ second-team offense came in to open the second half.

* Pacman Jones made two great plays on Denver’s first possession.

* Tashard Choice blocked a punt, but punter Brett Kern was able to pick up the ball and run 36 yards downfield to give Denver a first down.

* Patrick Watkins picked off a Patrick Ramsey pass, but it was nullified by a penalty on Alan Ball.

* Ball also blew coverage on a 3rd-and-7 play, allowing Ramsey to hit Cliff Russell for 19 yards. He nearly made a pick on a 3rd down play in the red zone but could not get to the ball.

* Prater’s 29-yard field goal gives the Broncos a 17-10 lead.

Offense (6:18)

* Richard Bartel came into the game at quarterback. He was unable to get the offense moving.

Defense (5:14)

* Dallas stopped Denver after a short drive.

* Denver pinned Dallas deep on the ensuing punt.

Offense (1:22)

* The Dallas backups look pretty lifeless. Two consecutive 3-and-outs.

End of Third Quarter: Denver 17, Dallas 10

Fourth Quarter

Defense

* On 4th-and-1, Courtney Brown was burned by Keary Colbert, who caught a pass from Ramsey for 28 yards.

* Inside the red zone, Orlando Scandrick nailed Glenn Martinez, who was shaken up on the play.

* Matt Prater gave Denver a 20-10 lead with a 19-yard field goal.

Offense (11:57)

* Todd Lowber, now of Hard Knocks fame, caught his first pass of the preseason on a 39-yard reception. Nice play.

* Tight end Rodney Hannah made two good plays, catching passes for 13 and 14 yards. However, on a 3rd-and-8 from the 11, Bartel could not get the ball to Hannah due to a nice play by Denver linebacker Wesley Woodyard.

* Nick Folk’s 29-yard field goal cut the Denver lead to 20-13.

Defense (7:57)

* Evan Oglesby made a couple of nice plays to kill a Denver drive.

Special Teams (7:04)

* Danny Amendola finally got a chance to return a punt. He gained nine yards.

Offense (6:52)

* Hannah had another catch, going 20 yards.

* Keon Lattimore (another of Hard Knocks fame and brother of Ray Lewis) got a few carries. He had some nice runs (two 11 yard runs in a row).

* Danny Amendola caught a pass, going 12 yards to give Dallas a 1st down in the red zone.

* Key Moment. 4th-and-5, Denver 10 (2:42 remaining): Bartel’s pass is picked off by Jack Williams. It was Lowber’s fault for turning the wrong way. Bartel hustled to make a shoestring tackle, saving a touchdown.

Defense (2:18)

* Denver moved into field goal position, thanks to a penalty on Darrell Robertson. Prater made it a 23-13 game.

Final: Denver 23, Dallas 13

Preseason Game #2: Broncos 23, Cowboys 13

Cowboys Broncos

Box Score

Recap (Yahoo!)

Game Summary

The Cowboys’ defense had a tough time slowing down the Denver offense early in tonight’s game, as the Cowboys lost to the Broncos, 23-13.

Dallas fell behind 7-0 when Denver moved the ball 65 yards in nine plays, capped off by a one-yard touchdown run by Andre Hall. Dallas moved the ball into Denver territory on the Cowboys’ first possession, but Dallas was forced to punt.

Denver got the ball deep in its own territory with about three minutes to play in the first quarter, and it appeared as if Dallas had stopped Denver. However, an unnecessary roughness penalty on Bradie James kept the drive going for the Broncos, who then marched down field and completed a 90-yard drive when Jay Cutler hit Brandon Marshall on a three-yard touchdown pass. That gave Denver a 14-0 lead, and Dallas struggled to catch up for the rest of the game.

The star of the game for Dallas was Miles Austin, who on one drive late in the first half caught two big-time passes from backup quarterback Brad Johnson. One reception went for 37 yards on a third-and-four from the Denver 46. The second was a five-yard touchdown reception where Austin outjumped Denver defensive back Domonique Foxworth. The score cut the Denver lead to 14-7 at the half.

Austin suffered a knee injury, however, and missed the rest of the game.

Johnson led Dallas to a field goal early in the third quarter, and then Richard Bartel took over. The offense looked quite lackluster during Bartel’s first few series, but several backups stepped up in the fourth quarter. Tight end Rodney Hannah caught four passes, while running back Keon Lattimore (brother of Ravens’ linebacker Ray Lewis) made a few good runs.

With Dallas trailing 20-13, the Cowboys moved deep into Denver territory. Facing a 4th-and-5 from the Denver 10 with 2:29 remaining in the game, Bartel tried to get the ball to Danny Amendola. However, Amendola made one too many moves and turned the wrong way. Denver’s Jack Williams picked off the pass and would have run it back for a touchdown if it weren’t for a last-second tackle by Bartel.

The offensive skill players played about a quarter and a half. Tony Romo completed six of nine passes for 33 yards. Terrell Owens had three receptions for 20 yards, while Jason Witten went without a catch. Marion Barber carried five times for 22 yards.

Bullet-Pointed Game Notes

1st Quarter

Special Teams (15:00)

* Special teams missed several tackles on the opening kickoff. Andre Hall returned the kickoff 32 yards.

Dallas Defense (14:53)

* Mike Jenkins slipped on an out-and-up, allowing Eddie Royal to catch a 35-yard pass.

* Zach Thomas had two solid plays inside the red zone on Denver’s first series.

* Jay Cutler started the game going 5-for-5 for 61 yards.

* Overall, the Dallas defense looked weak to open the game. Denver scored on an Andre Hall run.

Special Teams (9:43)

* Isaiah Stanback had a great return after the Denver touchdown, taking it back 35 yards.

Dallas Offense (9:36)

* Terrell Owens caught his first passes of the preseason, including one on a 3rd-and-4 play.

* Marion Barber had a couple of nice plays, including an 11-yard run to get a first down in Denver territory.

* Dallas had three penalties on the first drive.

Dallas Defense (3:49)

* There’s a commercial for a “new spirit” at Albertson’s. I think this is the third straight season that there’s been this new spirit, because I think it is exactly the same commercial.

* Denver was hit by the penalty bug on its second offensive series, getting hit with three flags on three consecutive plays.

* Dallas give up a first down on 3rd-and-16 when Bradie James was called for unnecessary roughness.

* It looked like Dallas was tackling a little bit better, but three Cowboys (Thomas, Roy Williams, Tank Johnson) missed a tackle up the middle on Andre Hall.

End of First Quarter: Denver 7, Dallas 0

Second Quarter

Dallas Defense (15:00)

* Eddie Royal made a very impressive play on the first play of the second quarter, catching a pass for 32 yards. It looked as if Anthony Henry would intercept the pass.

* Denver walked right over the Cowboys on this drive. Jay Cutler hit Brandon Marshall on a three-yard touchdown.

* On two drives, Cutler has gone 9-for-9 for 120 yards and a touchdown.

Offense (12:56)

* Tony Curtis caught a pass early in the second quarter. He looked good in preseason last year, and it does not look as if Martellus Bennett is ready to contribute just yet.

* Romo missed Sam Hurd on a deep pass on a 3rd-and-4. The play would have gone for a touchdown.

Special Teams (11:37)

* Mike Jenkins made a good tackle on a punt return.

Defense (11:28)

* Dallas is not looking good against the pass or the run. Cutler completed his first 12 passes; however, Bradie James knocked down a pass on 3rd-and-5.

Special Teams (7:20)

* Danny Amendola lined up to return the first Denver punt of the game, but the punt was a touchback.

Offense (7:08)

* Brad Johnson came in the game midway through the second quarter.

* First play with Johnson: a reverse to Miles Austin, which lost three yards.

* Felix Jones’ first play: 11 yard run off right tackle. However, he was called for tripping on a 3rd down play, negating a first-down pass from Johnson to Deon Anderson.

* As of 5:36 of the 2nd quarter:

First Downs: Denver 12, Dallas 3
Total Yards: Denver 196, Dallas 63

Defense (5:36)

* The Dallas starters on defense remained in the game.

* Marcus Spears had a nice tackle on a second down play.

* Jay Ratliff made a nice stop on Selmon Young on a 3rd-and-12.

Special Teams (4:07)

* Pacman Jones nearly broke a punt return, going 24 yards. However, he was penalized for delay of game for spiking the ball.

Offense (3:53)

* The offensive line played most of the first half. The skill players did not.

* Miles Austin made a great catch just after the two minute warning. It went for 37 yards. Brad Johnson underthrew the ball, but Austin reached behind Domonique Foxworth to get the pass.

* Austin made another catch on a five-yard touchdown, outjumping Foxworth to get the ball.

Special Teams (1:37)

* Sam Hurd made a great tackle on Andre Hall on the kickoff following the Dallas touchdown.

Defense (1:32)

* The Cowboys put in their backups at the end of the second quarter. Denver left its starters for the entire half.

* Denver moved the ball to get into field goal position late. However, Matt Prater missed a 49-yard field goal attempt.

Halftime: Denver 14, Dallas 7

3rd Quarter

Offense (15:00)

* Brad Johnson remained in the game to start the second half.

* Felix Jones made a very nice catch-and-run on the first play of the third quarter, thanks largely to a block by Julius Crosslin. The play went 27 yards.

* Martellus Bennett caught an 11-yard pass.

* Nick Folk made a 42-yard fielg goal to cap off the opening drive of the second half.

* The sideline reporter just said that Miles Austin suffered a knee sprain shortly after catching his touchdown pass during the first quarter. Chris Canty suffered a minor injury in the first half, but he seems fine.

Final stats: Brad Johnson: 9/12, 114 yards, 1 TD

Special Teams (10:31)

* Bennett made tackle on the kickoff following the Folk field goal.

Defense (10:26)

* The Broncos’ second-team offense came in to open the second half.

* Pacman Jones made two great plays on Denver’s first possession.

* Tashard Choice blocked a punt, but punter Brett Kern was able to pick up the ball and run 36 yards downfield to give Denver a first down.

* Patrick Watkins picked off a Patrick Ramsey pass, but it was nullified by a penalty on Alan Ball.

* Ball also blew coverage on a 3rd-and-7 play, allowing Ramsey to hit Cliff Russell for 19 yards. He nearly made a pick on a 3rd down play in the red zone but could not get to the ball.

* Prater’s 29-yard field goal gives the Broncos a 17-10 lead.

Offense (6:18)

* Richard Bartel came into the game at quarterback. He was unable to get the offense moving.

Defense (5:14)

* Dallas stopped Denver after a short drive.

* Denver pinned Dallas deep on the ensuing punt.

Offense (1:22)

* The Dallas backups look pretty lifeless. Two consecutive 3-and-outs.

End of Third Quarter: Denver 17, Dallas 10

Fourth Quarter

Defense

* On 4th-and-1, Courtney Brown was burned by Keary Colbert, who caught a pass from Ramsey for 28 yards.

* Inside the red zone, Orlando Scandrick nailed Glenn Martinez, who was shaken up on the play.

* Matt Prater gave Denver a 20-10 lead with a 19-yard field goal.

Offense (11:57)

* Todd Lowber, now of Hard Knocks fame, caught his first pass of the preseason on a 39-yard reception. Nice play.

* Tight end Rodney Hannah made two good plays, catching passes for 13 and 14 yards. However, on a 3rd-and-8 from the 11, Bartel could not get the ball to Hannah due to a nice play by Denver linebacker Wesley Woodyard.

* Nick Folk’s 29-yard field goal cut the Denver lead to 20-13.

Defense (7:57)

* Evan Oglesby made a couple of nice plays to kill a Denver drive.

Special Teams (7:04)

* Danny Amendola finally got a chance to return a punt. He gained nine yards.

Offense (6:52)

* Hannah had another catch, going 20 yards.

* Keon Lattimore (another of Hard Knocks fame and brother of Ray Lewis) got a few carries. He had some nice runs (two 11 yard runs in a row).

* Danny Amendola caught a pass, going 12 yards to give Dallas a 1st down in the red zone.

* Key Moment. 4th-and-5, Denver 10 (2:42 remaining): Bartel’s pass is picked off by Jack Williams. It was Lowber’s fault for turning the wrong way. Bartel hustled to make a shoestring tackle, saving a touchdown.

Defense (2:18)

* Denver moved into field goal position, thanks to a penalty on Darrell Robertson. Prater made it a 23-13 game.

Final: Denver 23, Dallas 13

Meta Preview: Cowboys vs. Broncos

dallas_logo.gif

Dallas Cowboys at Denver Broncos

Preseason Game #2
Saturday, August 16, 8:00 P.M. (Central)
INVESCO Field at Mile High

Here are some things to see, hear, and read in anticipation of tonight’s game between the Cowboys and Broncos.

Something to See

Here is the video preview of the game from NFL.com:

Something to Hear

There are a few good podcasts worth listening to.

Norm Hitzges talked about the Cowboys yesterday. Here is the clip.

[audio:http://cumuluspodcasting.com/media/KTCK/KTCK175/KTCK_081508_Norm-Cowboys.mp3]

Derek Eagleton and Nick Eatman discuss the few (and there are very few) position battles.

[audio:http://www.dallascowboys.com/mp3/lunch/liveLunchBreak_081408b.mp3]

And here is ESPN’s Jeremy Green ranking the Cowboys as the top team in the NFC.

[audio:http://www.knowyourdallascowboys.com/podcast/cowboys.green.mp3]

Something to Read

Just a few articles to read:

Game Preview (DallasCowboys.com)

Adam Jones, Dallas Cowboys Backups on Notice Against Broncos (Fort Worth Star Telegram)

All but Four Cowboys Starters Will Play Entire First Half (Fort Worth Star Telegram)

Second Look a Key Opportunity for Three Dallas Cowboys (Dallas Morning News)

Game a Special Chance for Some Young Dallas Cowboys (Dallas Morning News)

Cowboys Team Report (Yahoo! Sports)

Meta Preview: Cowboys vs. Broncos

dallas_logo.gif

Dallas Cowboys at Denver Broncos

Preseason Game #2
Saturday, August 16, 8:00 P.M. (Central)
INVESCO Field at Mile High

Here are some things to see, hear, and read in anticipation of tonight’s game between the Cowboys and Broncos.

Something to See

Here is the video preview of the game from NFL.com:

Something to Hear

There are a few good podcasts worth listening to.

Norm Hitzges talked about the Cowboys yesterday. Here is the clip.

[audio:http://cumuluspodcasting.com/media/KTCK/KTCK175/KTCK_081508_Norm-Cowboys.mp3]

Derek Eagleton and Nick Eatman discuss the few (and there are very few) position battles.

[audio:http://www.dallascowboys.com/mp3/lunch/liveLunchBreak_081408b.mp3]

And here is ESPN’s Jeremy Green ranking the Cowboys as the top team in the NFC.

[audio:http://www.knowyourdallascowboys.com/podcast/cowboys.green.mp3]

Something to Read

Just a few articles to read:

Game Preview (DallasCowboys.com)

Adam Jones, Dallas Cowboys Backups on Notice Against Broncos (Fort Worth Star Telegram)

All but Four Cowboys Starters Will Play Entire First Half (Fort Worth Star Telegram)

Second Look a Key Opportunity for Three Dallas Cowboys (Dallas Morning News)

Game a Special Chance for Some Young Dallas Cowboys (Dallas Morning News)

Cowboys Team Report (Yahoo! Sports)

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #78

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #78

Eleven players have worn #78 for the Cowboys. This includes five offensive linemen and six defensive linemen.

Bob Asher, T, Vanderbilt, 1970

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: “Smasher” Asher was highly touted as a rookie but seldom played. He was injured in 1971 and did not play for the Cowboys again. He later played for Chicago.

John Dutton, DL, Nebraska, 1979-87

Statistics: Dutton recorded 18 sacks with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None with Dallas.

Longevity: He played nine seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Dallas acquired Dutton in 1979 when Too Tall Jones tried to become a boxer. Dutton was a former All-Pro with Baltimore, but he had contract problems with the Colts. He was often injured with Dallas, and when Jones returned in 1980, Dallas moved Dutton to left defensive tackle. He played there until 1986.

Don Healy, DT, Maryland, 1960-61

Statistics: Healy recorded one interception with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: The Cowboys acquired Healy in the 1960 expansion draft from Chicago. He played defensive tackle for two season before moving on to Buffalo.

Leon Lett, DL, Emporia State, 1991-2000

Statistics: Lett recorded 22.5 sacks and 229 tackles with the Cowboys.

Accolades: He was twice named to the Pro Bowl.

Longevity: Lett played 10 seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: He is best remembered for his blunders, but Lett was a solid defensive tackle. He had speed an athleticism that few defensive linemen could match. Then again, there was his judgment…

James Marten, OT, Boston College, 2007-present

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Marten has yet to dress for a game with the Cowboys, but that is likely to change this season.

Intangibles: Marten was drafted in 2007 as a tackle, but he may see some action this season at guard.

John Meyers, DT, Washington, 1962-63

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Meyers was a starter in 1962 and part of 1963, but when Dallas moved Bob Lilly to defensive tackle in 1963, Meyers was benched. He was traded to the Eagles after the 1963 season.

Greg Schaum, DE, Michigan State, 1976

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Schaum was the backup to Too Tall Jones and Harvey Martin in 1976, but an injury sidelined him for the 1977 season. He played his last NFL season in 1978 with New England.

Kurt Vollers, T, Notre Dame, 2002-04

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played three seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Vollers was one of several linemen given a chance to start at right tackle during the 2000s. He lasted three years before moving on to Indianapolis.

Bruce Walton, G, UCLA, 1973-75

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played three seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Bruce Walton is the older brother of basketball great Bill Walton. Bruce was a backup offensive lineman with Dallas.

Dave Widell, T, Boston College, 1988-89

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Widell started several games with the Cowboys due to injuries to other players. The Cowboys traded Widell in 1990 to Denver, and the player the Cowboys acquired with the draft choice was Leon Lett.

Maury Youmans, DE, Syracuse, 1964-65

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Youmans played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Youmans started one season at left defensive end in 1965, but that was his last in the NFL.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #78.

Greatest #78

  • Leon Lett (87%, 80 Votes)
  • John Dutton (11%, 10 Votes)
  • Maury Youmans (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Dave Widell (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Bruce Walton (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Kurt Vollers (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Greg Schaum (0%, 0 Votes)
  • John Meyers (0%, 0 Votes)
  • James Marten (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Don Healy (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Bob Asher (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 92

Loading ... Loading ...

My Vote: Lett

Leon LettLett’s lapses in Super Bowl XXVII and in the Snow Bowl in 1993 were embarrassing, to be sure, but neither really mattered in the end, given that Dallas won Super Bowls in both seasons. What was less forgivable was his suspension in 1996 for testing positive for drugs. Dallas was 8-5 when he was suspended, and though the team won the NFC East with a 10-6 record, his absence was very noticeable during playoff loss to Carolina. During that game, converted fullback Anthony Johnson rushed right up the middle of the Dallas defense for 104 yards. Lett was also suspended in 1995 and 1999.

That said, Lett is still the best player on this list. He was very important in the 1995 run to Super Bowl XXX, and he returned to Pro Bowl form in 1998.

Of the others, Dutton is the only one who deserves serious mention. He was better than just about any lineman drafted during the 1980s, which allowed him to extend his playing career so long. However, he was never as good with Dallas as Lett.

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #78

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #78

Eleven players have worn #78 for the Cowboys. This includes five offensive linemen and six defensive linemen.

Bob Asher, T, Vanderbilt, 1970

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: “Smasher” Asher was highly touted as a rookie but seldom played. He was injured in 1971 and did not play for the Cowboys again. He later played for Chicago.

John Dutton, DL, Nebraska, 1979-87

Statistics: Dutton recorded 18 sacks with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None with Dallas.

Longevity: He played nine seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Dallas acquired Dutton in 1979 when Too Tall Jones tried to become a boxer. Dutton was a former All-Pro with Baltimore, but he had contract problems with the Colts. He was often injured with Dallas, and when Jones returned in 1980, Dallas moved Dutton to left defensive tackle. He played there until 1986.

Don Healy, DT, Maryland, 1960-61

Statistics: Healy recorded one interception with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: The Cowboys acquired Healy in the 1960 expansion draft from Chicago. He played defensive tackle for two season before moving on to Buffalo.

Leon Lett, DL, Emporia State, 1991-2000

Statistics: Lett recorded 22.5 sacks and 229 tackles with the Cowboys.

Accolades: He was twice named to the Pro Bowl.

Longevity: Lett played 10 seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: He is best remembered for his blunders, but Lett was a solid defensive tackle. He had speed an athleticism that few defensive linemen could match. Then again, there was his judgment…

James Marten, OT, Boston College, 2007-present

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Marten has yet to dress for a game with the Cowboys, but that is likely to change this season.

Intangibles: Marten was drafted in 2007 as a tackle, but he may see some action this season at guard.

John Meyers, DT, Washington, 1962-63

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Meyers was a starter in 1962 and part of 1963, but when Dallas moved Bob Lilly to defensive tackle in 1963, Meyers was benched. He was traded to the Eagles after the 1963 season.

Greg Schaum, DE, Michigan State, 1976

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Schaum was the backup to Too Tall Jones and Harvey Martin in 1976, but an injury sidelined him for the 1977 season. He played his last NFL season in 1978 with New England.

Kurt Vollers, T, Notre Dame, 2002-04

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played three seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Vollers was one of several linemen given a chance to start at right tackle during the 2000s. He lasted three years before moving on to Indianapolis.

Bruce Walton, G, UCLA, 1973-75

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played three seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Bruce Walton is the older brother of basketball great Bill Walton. Bruce was a backup offensive lineman with Dallas.

Dave Widell, T, Boston College, 1988-89

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Widell started several games with the Cowboys due to injuries to other players. The Cowboys traded Widell in 1990 to Denver, and the player the Cowboys acquired with the draft choice was Leon Lett.

Maury Youmans, DE, Syracuse, 1964-65

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Youmans played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Youmans started one season at left defensive end in 1965, but that was his last in the NFL.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #78.

Greatest #78

  • Leon Lett (87%, 80 Votes)
  • John Dutton (11%, 10 Votes)
  • Maury Youmans (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Dave Widell (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Bruce Walton (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Kurt Vollers (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Greg Schaum (0%, 0 Votes)
  • John Meyers (0%, 0 Votes)
  • James Marten (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Don Healy (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Bob Asher (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 92

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My Vote: Lett

Leon LettLett’s lapses in Super Bowl XXVII and in the Snow Bowl in 1993 were embarrassing, to be sure, but neither really mattered in the end, given that Dallas won Super Bowls in both seasons. What was less forgivable was his suspension in 1996 for testing positive for drugs. Dallas was 8-5 when he was suspended, and though the team won the NFC East with a 10-6 record, his absence was very noticeable during playoff loss to Carolina. During that game, converted fullback Anthony Johnson rushed right up the middle of the Dallas defense for 104 yards. Lett was also suspended in 1995 and 1999.

That said, Lett is still the best player on this list. He was very important in the 1995 run to Super Bowl XXX, and he returned to Pro Bowl form in 1998.

Of the others, Dutton is the only one who deserves serious mention. He was better than just about any lineman drafted during the 1980s, which allowed him to extend his playing career so long. However, he was never as good with Dallas as Lett.

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #77

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #77

Thirteen players have worn #77 for the Cowboys. This includes six offensive linemen and seven defensive linemen.

Byron Bradfute, T, Southern Mississippi, 1960-61

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Bradfute made the team as a rookie in 1960, and he became the team’s starting right tackle. However, he was injured in 1961 and never played again.

Clyde Brock, DT, Utah State, 1962-63

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Brock was a backup on both defense and offense, and he saw quite a bit of action in 1963 filling in for an injured George Andrie. He was traded in 1964 to San Francisco.

Steve Cisowski, T, Santa Clara, 1987

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played in the three strike games in 1987.

Intangibles: n/a

Jim Colvin, DT, Houston, 1964-66

Statistics: He recovered five fumbles for the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played three seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Dallas acquired Colvin from Baltimore in 1964, and he started all three seasons he was with the team. However, he was injured in 1966 and was traded to the Giants after that season.

Ron East, DT, Montana State, 1967-70

Statistics: East recorded five fumble recoveries for the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played four seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: East made the team as a free agent in 1967, and he served as a backup to Bob Lilly and Jethro Pugh for four years. He later played for San Diego, the World Football League, and finally the Cleveland Browns.

Bill Gregory, DL, Wisconsin, 1971-77

Statistics: Gregory recorded several tackles as a backup defensive lineman.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played seven seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Gregory backed up the likes of Jethro Pugh, Bob Lilly, and Larry Cole. He was later traded to Seattle.

Jim Jeffcoat, DE, Arizona State, 1983-94

Statistics: Jeffcoat recorded 94.5 sacks and 690 tackles with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played twelve seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Jeffcoat was one of the few quality picks that the Cowboys made during the 1980s, at least prior to arrival of Jimmy Johnson. Jeffcoat had more than 10 sacks five times during his career, which was a long one. He lost his starting job with the arrival of Charles Haley in 1992, but Jeffcoat was still great in the rotation. He finished his career by playing three seasons with Buffalo.

Pat McQuistan, OT, Weber St., 2006-present

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He enters his third season with the team in 2008.

Intangibles: McQuistan is one of the scariest-looking players the Cowboys have ever had, and he might just get a few chances to play this year. Until now, he has been a backup.

Solomon Page, G/T, West Virginia, 1999-02

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played four seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: The Cowboys acquired Page in the second round of the 1999 draft, and though he was a starter for several years, he was generally the weak link on the line. He played one season in San Diego before his career ended.

Steve Scifres, OL, Wyoming, 1997

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: He was a third-round bust in the 1997 draft. He played one season in Carolina before embarking on an Arena Football League career.

Larry Stephens, DE, Texas, 1963-67

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played five seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Stephens was primarily a backup but filled in at every position on the defensive line.

Bruce Thornton, DL, Illinois, 1979-81

Statistics: Thornton recorded one interception with the Cowboys. He also had six sacks (unofficially) as a rookie in 1979.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played three seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Thornton is not related to the Bruce Thornton who played cornerback for Dallas in 2004-05. However, the Bruce Thornton who played defensive line is the father of Kalen Thornton, who played linebacker for the Cowboys in 2004. Got it? I didnt’ at first. Bruce Thornton saw quite a bit of action early in his career, due in large part to Too Tall Jones’ one-year hiatus to box.

Torrin Tucker, T, Southern Mississippi, 2003-05

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played three seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Tucker was one of several players who got a shot to start at right tackle during the 2000s. He also filled in for an injured Flozell Adams at left tackle in 2005, but he was largely ineffective and did not play after that season.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #77.

Greatest #77

  • Jim Jeffcoat (94%, 108 Votes)
  • Torrin Tucker (2%, 2 Votes)
  • Bill Gregory (2%, 2 Votes)
  • Byron Bradfute (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Larry Stephens (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Pat McQuistan (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Bruce Thornton (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Steve Scifres (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Solomon Page (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Clyde Brock (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Steve Cisowski (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Ron East (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Jim Colvin (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 115

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My Vote: Jeffcoat

Jim JeffcoatIt may surprise some that Jeffcoat never made a Pro Bowl. However, he had to compete with the likes of Richard Dent, Leonard Marshall, Dan Hampton, Dexter Manley, Charles Mann, and Reggie White, each of whom played on teams that were more successful than Dallas during Jeffcoat’s best years. He is clearly the best player on this list of Cowboys who wore #77, though, given that most of the others were primarily backups.

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #77

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #77

Thirteen players have worn #77 for the Cowboys. This includes six offensive linemen and seven defensive linemen.

Byron Bradfute, T, Southern Mississippi, 1960-61

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Bradfute made the team as a rookie in 1960, and he became the team’s starting right tackle. However, he was injured in 1961 and never played again.

Clyde Brock, DT, Utah State, 1962-63

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Brock was a backup on both defense and offense, and he saw quite a bit of action in 1963 filling in for an injured George Andrie. He was traded in 1964 to San Francisco.

Steve Cisowski, T, Santa Clara, 1987

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played in the three strike games in 1987.

Intangibles: n/a

Jim Colvin, DT, Houston, 1964-66

Statistics: He recovered five fumbles for the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played three seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Dallas acquired Colvin from Baltimore in 1964, and he started all three seasons he was with the team. However, he was injured in 1966 and was traded to the Giants after that season.

Ron East, DT, Montana State, 1967-70

Statistics: East recorded five fumble recoveries for the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played four seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: East made the team as a free agent in 1967, and he served as a backup to Bob Lilly and Jethro Pugh for four years. He later played for San Diego, the World Football League, and finally the Cleveland Browns.

Bill Gregory, DL, Wisconsin, 1971-77

Statistics: Gregory recorded several tackles as a backup defensive lineman.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played seven seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Gregory backed up the likes of Jethro Pugh, Bob Lilly, and Larry Cole. He was later traded to Seattle.

Jim Jeffcoat, DE, Arizona State, 1983-94

Statistics: Jeffcoat recorded 94.5 sacks and 690 tackles with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played twelve seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Jeffcoat was one of the few quality picks that the Cowboys made during the 1980s, at least prior to arrival of Jimmy Johnson. Jeffcoat had more than 10 sacks five times during his career, which was a long one. He lost his starting job with the arrival of Charles Haley in 1992, but Jeffcoat was still great in the rotation. He finished his career by playing three seasons with Buffalo.

Pat McQuistan, OT, Weber St., 2006-present

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He enters his third season with the team in 2008.

Intangibles: McQuistan is one of the scariest-looking players the Cowboys have ever had, and he might just get a few chances to play this year. Until now, he has been a backup.

Solomon Page, G/T, West Virginia, 1999-02

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played four seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: The Cowboys acquired Page in the second round of the 1999 draft, and though he was a starter for several years, he was generally the weak link on the line. He played one season in San Diego before his career ended.

Steve Scifres, OL, Wyoming, 1997

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: He was a third-round bust in the 1997 draft. He played one season in Carolina before embarking on an Arena Football League career.

Larry Stephens, DE, Texas, 1963-67

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played five seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Stephens was primarily a backup but filled in at every position on the defensive line.

Bruce Thornton, DL, Illinois, 1979-81

Statistics: Thornton recorded one interception with the Cowboys. He also had six sacks (unofficially) as a rookie in 1979.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played three seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Thornton is not related to the Bruce Thornton who played cornerback for Dallas in 2004-05. However, the Bruce Thornton who played defensive line is the father of Kalen Thornton, who played linebacker for the Cowboys in 2004. Got it? I didnt’ at first. Bruce Thornton saw quite a bit of action early in his career, due in large part to Too Tall Jones’ one-year hiatus to box.

Torrin Tucker, T, Southern Mississippi, 2003-05

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played three seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Tucker was one of several players who got a shot to start at right tackle during the 2000s. He also filled in for an injured Flozell Adams at left tackle in 2005, but he was largely ineffective and did not play after that season.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #77.

Greatest #77

  • Jim Jeffcoat (94%, 108 Votes)
  • Torrin Tucker (2%, 2 Votes)
  • Bill Gregory (2%, 2 Votes)
  • Byron Bradfute (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Larry Stephens (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Pat McQuistan (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Bruce Thornton (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Steve Scifres (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Solomon Page (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Clyde Brock (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Steve Cisowski (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Ron East (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Jim Colvin (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 115

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My Vote: Jeffcoat

Jim JeffcoatIt may surprise some that Jeffcoat never made a Pro Bowl. However, he had to compete with the likes of Richard Dent, Leonard Marshall, Dan Hampton, Dexter Manley, Charles Mann, and Reggie White, each of whom played on teams that were more successful than Dallas during Jeffcoat’s best years. He is clearly the best player on this list of Cowboys who wore #77, though, given that most of the others were primarily backups.

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #76

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #76

Ten players have worn #76 for the Cowboys. This includes seven offensive linemen and three defensive linemen.

Flozell Adams, OT, Michigan State, 1998-

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: He has been named to four Pro Bowls.

Longevity: Adams will enter his eleventh season in 2008.

Intangibles: The Cowboys were lucky to pick up Adams in the 1998 draft, taking him in the second round. Although he has been accused of underachieving, he has been solid for a significant length of time. Dallas gave him a $42 million contract in the 2008 offseason.

Dowe Aughtman, OL, Auburn, 1984

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season for the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Dallas tried to convert Aughtman from defense to offense, but an injury suffered during his rookie season ended his career.

Larry Bethea, DL, Michigan State, 1978-83

Statistics: Bethea officially recorded five sacks, though this only includes his last two seasons in the league.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played six seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Bethea had difficulty breaking into the starting lineup in Dallas, but he lasted several years as a backup. After playing in the USFL, he fell on hard times and suffered from bouts of depression. He committed suicide in 1987.

Bill Frank, T, Colorado, 1964

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Frank signed late in the 1964 season, his last in the NFL.

John Gonzaga, DE, No College, 1960

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Gonzaga was an offensive lineman for San Francisco, but the Cowboys converted him to defense. He played one season before being traded to Detroit.

John Niland, G, Iowa, 1966-74

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: Niland was named to six Pro Bowls and made two All-Pro teams.

Longevity: He played nine seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Niland was a very fast guard who excelled as a pulling guard. He made the Pro Bowl in six of his nine seasons in Dallas. He had some psychological problems late in his career and was injured when police were forced to restrain him. This does not detract, though, from his on-field performance.

Ed Nutting, T, Georgia Tech, 1963

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Dallas acquired Nutting from Cleveland in 1962, but he was injured that year and missed the entire season. He started several games in 1963, which was his last in the NFL.

Bob Otto, DL, Idaho State, 1986

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played less than a full season with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Dallas acquired Otto after Seattle released him. However, he lasted only a short period of time with the Cowboys.

Alan Veingrad, OL, East Texas State, 1991-92

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Veingard once started over Tony Mandarich in Green Bay. Dallas acquired him via Plan B free agency in 1991, and he started a few games when Mark Tuinei was injured. He was a backup for two seasons.

Jeff Zimmerman, G, Florida, 1987-90

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Zimmerman played four seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: At 320 pounds, Zimmerman was huge for his day. His claim to fame was that he knocked Lawrence Taylor unconscious in 1987. However, injuries cost him quite a few games, and he was out of the league after 1990.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #76.

Greatest #76

  • John Niland (46%, 51 Votes)
  • Flozell Adams (43%, 48 Votes)
  • Larry Bethea (4%, 4 Votes)
  • Bob Otto (4%, 4 Votes)
  • Jeff Zimmerman (3%, 3 Votes)
  • Jerry Reynolds (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Bill Frank (0%, 0 Votes)
  • John Gonzaga (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Dowe Aughtman (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Ed Nutting (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Alan Veingrad (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 111

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My Vote: Niland

John NilandThis is a tough one between Niland and Adams. Niland was a Pro Bowler for most of his career in Dallas, and he was an important part of two Super Bowl teams. After a very promising start, Adams was a little bit slow to develop. However, he has been very good for the past five seasons. Between the two, I think Niland was an overall better player who received more accolades than Adams, who is also deserving.

The Larry Bethea story is sad. He was only 30 years old when he took his life. He is probably best remembered as one of the Dallas players chasing Joe Montana before Dwight Clark caught “The Catch.” The New York Times’ coverage of Bethea’s suicide is here.

New for 2008: 10 Minutes to Know Your Dallas Cowboys, Episode 10

Very few probably remember 10 Minutes to Know Your Dallas Cowboys, which has appeared as both YouTube clips and as a podcast. I wouldn’t call it popular, but a few people from time to time have asked for en encore, so here it goes.

Gnome has decided to start the podcast again, but when he tries to gather up the whole gang, he discovers that all of them moved to Florida to be near Bill Parcells. That leaves him by himself with nothing but a camera, text-to-speech software, and Jerry Jones flying in the clouds.

Depending on whether more than a dozen people watch this, and whether I have any patience with animation software (this one used very little), I’ll post one again next week. Hope someone enjoys this. My kids found it mildly amusing. I think.