Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #75

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #75

Nine players have worn #75 for the Cowboys. This includes five defensive linemen and four offensive linemen.

Jon Carter, DT, Pittsburgh, 1989

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Carter was one of several defensive linemen who saw action in 1989. He was out of the league after that season.

Tony Casillas, DT, Oklahoma, 1991-93, 1996-97

Statistics: Casillas recorded 10.5 sacks and 203 tackles with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None with Dallas.

Longevity: He played a total of five years in Dallas on two tours of duty.

Intangibles: Casillas was a bit of a bust in Atlanta, after being selected in the first round of the 1986 draft by the Falcons. He arrived in Dallas after missing nearly half of the 1990 season, but he was an important part of the first two Super Bowl teams of the 1990s. He left after the 1993 season but returned in 1996.

Marc Colombo, OT, Boston College, 2006-

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He will enter his third season in Dallas in 2008.

Intangibles: Columbo was a bust as a first-round pick in Chicago, but he has been a solid right tackle with the Cowboys. This may be his final season with the Cowboys, depending on free agency.

Bob Fry, T, Kentucky, 1960-64

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played five seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: The Cowboys acquired Fry in the 1960 expansion draft, and he started at both right and left tackle for the Cowboys.

Brandon Noble, DT, Penn State, 1999-02

Statistics: Noble recorded 7.5 sacks and 101 tackles with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played four seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Noble became a starter with Dallas during the bad 5-11 seasons earlier this decade. He was gone as Bill Parcells arrived.

Phil Pozderac, T, Notre Dame, 1982-87

Statistics: He is actually taller than Ed Jones.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Pozderac played six season in Dallas.

Intangibles: He developed into a starter but is probably best remembered for false start penalties in 1986. He quit football in 1987.

Jethro Pugh, DT, Elizabeth City, 1965-78

Statistics: He led the team in sacks for five consecutive years, and he recovered a total of 14 fumbles during his career.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played 14 seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Pugh played in the shadows of Bob Lilly and Randy White, but he was an excellent player in his own right. One Dallas sportswriter said that Pugh was the greatest defensive lineman in history who was never selected to the Pro Bowl.

Marcellus Wiley, DE, Columbia, 2004

Statistics: Wiley recorded three sacks and 31 tackles with Dallas.

Accolades: None with Dallas.

Longevity: He played one season with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Wiley recorded a couple of double-digit sack seasons with the Chargers, but he did not accomplish much in Dallas.

Ryan Young, T, Kansas State, 2003

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Young was one of the former Jets signed by Bill Parcells in 2003. However, injuries slowed Young quite a bit, and he was gone from football after one season in Dallas.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #75.

Greatest #75

  • Jethro Pugh (78%, 84 Votes)
  • Tony Casillas (17%, 18 Votes)
  • Marc Colombo (4%, 4 Votes)
  • Brandon Noble (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Marcellus Wiley (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Jon Carter (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Bob Fry (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Phil Pozderac (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Ryan Young (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 108

Loading ... Loading ...

My Vote: Pugh

Jethro PughThis number presented an interesting mix of players. We have first-round busts in Marc Columbo and Tony Casillas, who came to Dallas and became very good role players. We have fairly big free agent signees in Marcellus Wiley and Ryan Young, neither of whom did much in Dallas. And you have Jethro Pugh, who came from tiny Elizabeth City State College and went on to play in five Super Bowls for the Cowboys. He may not have been named to a Pro Bowl, but he’s the best #75 the Cowboys have ever had.

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #75

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #75

Nine players have worn #75 for the Cowboys. This includes five defensive linemen and four offensive linemen.

Jon Carter, DT, Pittsburgh, 1989

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Carter was one of several defensive linemen who saw action in 1989. He was out of the league after that season.

Tony Casillas, DT, Oklahoma, 1991-93, 1996-97

Statistics: Casillas recorded 10.5 sacks and 203 tackles with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None with Dallas.

Longevity: He played a total of five years in Dallas on two tours of duty.

Intangibles: Casillas was a bit of a bust in Atlanta, after being selected in the first round of the 1986 draft by the Falcons. He arrived in Dallas after missing nearly half of the 1990 season, but he was an important part of the first two Super Bowl teams of the 1990s. He left after the 1993 season but returned in 1996.

Marc Colombo, OT, Boston College, 2006-

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He will enter his third season in Dallas in 2008.

Intangibles: Columbo was a bust as a first-round pick in Chicago, but he has been a solid right tackle with the Cowboys. This may be his final season with the Cowboys, depending on free agency.

Bob Fry, T, Kentucky, 1960-64

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played five seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: The Cowboys acquired Fry in the 1960 expansion draft, and he started at both right and left tackle for the Cowboys.

Brandon Noble, DT, Penn State, 1999-02

Statistics: Noble recorded 7.5 sacks and 101 tackles with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played four seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Noble became a starter with Dallas during the bad 5-11 seasons earlier this decade. He was gone as Bill Parcells arrived.

Phil Pozderac, T, Notre Dame, 1982-87

Statistics: He is actually taller than Ed Jones.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Pozderac played six season in Dallas.

Intangibles: He developed into a starter but is probably best remembered for false start penalties in 1986. He quit football in 1987.

Jethro Pugh, DT, Elizabeth City, 1965-78

Statistics: He led the team in sacks for five consecutive years, and he recovered a total of 14 fumbles during his career.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played 14 seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Pugh played in the shadows of Bob Lilly and Randy White, but he was an excellent player in his own right. One Dallas sportswriter said that Pugh was the greatest defensive lineman in history who was never selected to the Pro Bowl.

Marcellus Wiley, DE, Columbia, 2004

Statistics: Wiley recorded three sacks and 31 tackles with Dallas.

Accolades: None with Dallas.

Longevity: He played one season with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Wiley recorded a couple of double-digit sack seasons with the Chargers, but he did not accomplish much in Dallas.

Ryan Young, T, Kansas State, 2003

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Young was one of the former Jets signed by Bill Parcells in 2003. However, injuries slowed Young quite a bit, and he was gone from football after one season in Dallas.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #75.

Greatest #75

  • Jethro Pugh (78%, 84 Votes)
  • Tony Casillas (17%, 18 Votes)
  • Marc Colombo (4%, 4 Votes)
  • Brandon Noble (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Marcellus Wiley (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Jon Carter (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Bob Fry (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Phil Pozderac (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Ryan Young (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 108

Loading ... Loading ...

My Vote: Pugh

Jethro PughThis number presented an interesting mix of players. We have first-round busts in Marc Columbo and Tony Casillas, who came to Dallas and became very good role players. We have fairly big free agent signees in Marcellus Wiley and Ryan Young, neither of whom did much in Dallas. And you have Jethro Pugh, who came from tiny Elizabeth City State College and went on to play in five Super Bowls for the Cowboys. He may not have been named to a Pro Bowl, but he’s the best #75 the Cowboys have ever had.

Classic Video: Documentary for Super Bowl X

I discovered a video clip yesterday showing a documentary of Super Bowl X, played in 1976 at the Orange Bowl in Miami. Here is the description:

A behind-the-scenes documentary about the events and personalities surrounding Superbowl X in Miami between the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Dallas Cowboys. Features intimate portraits of the players and the CBS personnel who broadcast the events of Superbowl week. Produced with multiple lightweight video cameras in TVTV style, it is both informative and revealing of the extremes surrounding football culture and hype.

I have seen small clips of Bill Murray during this show, but I had never seen the entire thing until yesterday. Here are some highlight clips (and I apologize in advance for the quality):

1. Tight End Jean Fugett Interviews Several Players

Here, you can see Jean Fugett interview Rayfield Wright, Too Tall Jones, Harvey Martin, and Billy Joe Dupree.

2. John Fitzgerald Interview

This clip features an interview with center John Fitzgerald, who discusses playing with injuries.

3. Ralph Neely Interview

This interview with Ralph Neely is especially interesting. He discusses his business life, which was quite separate from his football life.

At the end of the video, you can also see a short interview with Larry Cole.

Classic Video: Documentary for Super Bowl X

I discovered a video clip yesterday showing a documentary of Super Bowl X, played in 1976 at the Orange Bowl in Miami. Here is the description:

A behind-the-scenes documentary about the events and personalities surrounding Superbowl X in Miami between the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Dallas Cowboys. Features intimate portraits of the players and the CBS personnel who broadcast the events of Superbowl week. Produced with multiple lightweight video cameras in TVTV style, it is both informative and revealing of the extremes surrounding football culture and hype.

I have seen small clips of Bill Murray during this show, but I had never seen the entire thing until yesterday. Here are some highlight clips (and I apologize in advance for the quality):

1. Tight End Jean Fugett Interviews Several Players

Here, you can see Jean Fugett interview Rayfield Wright, Too Tall Jones, Harvey Martin, and Billy Joe Dupree.

2. John Fitzgerald Interview

This clip features an interview with center John Fitzgerald, who discusses playing with injuries.

3. Ralph Neely Interview

This interview with Ralph Neely is especially interesting. He discusses his business life, which was quite separate from his football life.

At the end of the video, you can also see a short interview with Larry Cole.

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #74

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #74

This number is the answer to a little trivia question: which number has only been worn by one member of the Dallas Cowboys?

That would be Mr. Cowboy, the first member of the Dallas Cowboys Ring of Honor, and one of the great defensive linemen to play professional football.

So, no poll for this one. Nobody has worn #74 since Bob Lilly retired after the 1974 season.

* * *

Thanks to Fred Goodwin, we know that Lilly’s autobiography is coming out in about a month. Here is the information about the book:

A Cowboy’s Life (Hardcover)

by Bob Lilly (Author), Kristine Clark (Author), Roger Staubach (Foreword)
List Price: $24.95

# Hardcover: 256 pages
# Publisher: Triumph Books (September 10, 2008)
# Language: English
# ISBN-10: 1600781012
# ISBN-13: 978-1600781018

Book Description

Bob Lilly is Mr. Cowboy. The humble man from Throckmorton, Texas, often called “the greatest defensive tackle in NFL history,” shares his life’s journey for the first time in A Cowboy’s Life. Lilly recounts his humble beginnings in Texas, being the first player ever drafted by the Dallas Cowboys in 1961, his induction into the Ring of Honor, and his passion for photography. It’s all here: Lilly’s innumerable successes, his injuries, the stories of what he did after he retired from the Cowboys, and what he is doing today. Well supplemented with many never-before-published photographs taken by Lilly himself, A Cowboy’s Life is the real story of Mr. Cowboy, straight from the man who lived it all.

From the Publisher

“A man like that comes along once in a lifetime. He is something a little more than great. Nobody is better than Bob Lilly.”
–Tom Landry

“Regardless of whether Bob was double-teamed or even triple-teamed, he’d still beat you. There were times when he didn’t even confront the opposition at all. He would either jump over them, go around them, or strategically outsmart them by making the play.”
–Roger Staubach, from the foreword

* * *

For those who like puzzles, I though this gadget was pretty interesting.




provided by flash-gear.com


Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #74

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #74

This number is the answer to a little trivia question: which number has only been worn by one member of the Dallas Cowboys?

That would be Mr. Cowboy, the first member of the Dallas Cowboys Ring of Honor, and one of the great defensive linemen to play professional football.

So, no poll for this one. Nobody has worn #74 since Bob Lilly retired after the 1974 season.

* * *

Thanks to Fred Goodwin, we know that Lilly’s autobiography is coming out in about a month. Here is the information about the book:

A Cowboy’s Life (Hardcover)

by Bob Lilly (Author), Kristine Clark (Author), Roger Staubach (Foreword)
List Price: $24.95

# Hardcover: 256 pages
# Publisher: Triumph Books (September 10, 2008)
# Language: English
# ISBN-10: 1600781012
# ISBN-13: 978-1600781018

Book Description

Bob Lilly is Mr. Cowboy. The humble man from Throckmorton, Texas, often called “the greatest defensive tackle in NFL history,” shares his life’s journey for the first time in A Cowboy’s Life. Lilly recounts his humble beginnings in Texas, being the first player ever drafted by the Dallas Cowboys in 1961, his induction into the Ring of Honor, and his passion for photography. It’s all here: Lilly’s innumerable successes, his injuries, the stories of what he did after he retired from the Cowboys, and what he is doing today. Well supplemented with many never-before-published photographs taken by Lilly himself, A Cowboy’s Life is the real story of Mr. Cowboy, straight from the man who lived it all.

From the Publisher

“A man like that comes along once in a lifetime. He is something a little more than great. Nobody is better than Bob Lilly.”
–Tom Landry

“Regardless of whether Bob was double-teamed or even triple-teamed, he’d still beat you. There were times when he didn’t even confront the opposition at all. He would either jump over them, go around them, or strategically outsmart them by making the play.”
–Roger Staubach, from the foreword

* * *

For those who like puzzles, I though this gadget was pretty interesting.




provided by flash-gear.com


Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #73

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #73

Eight players have worn #73 for the Cowboys. This includes seven offensive linemen and one defensive lineman.

Larry Allen, G/T, Sonoma State, 1994-05

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: Allen played in ten Pro Bowls as a Cowboy and made six All-Pro teams. He will almost certainly be inducted into the Ring of Honor and Hall of Fame.

Longevity: He played 12 seasons in Dallas. He appears to have retired after playing two seasons in San Francisco.

Intangibles: Very few linemen have earned as much attention as Allen. His strength is legendary, as was his ability to move for a man his size. He played four different positions on the offensive line during his career in Dallas, and he excelled at every position.

Dave Burnette, T, Central Arkansas, 1987

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played in one replacement game in 1987.

Intangibles: He was originally as 12th round draft choice by the Colts in 1985.

Monte Clark, T, Southern California, 1962

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Clark played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Dallas acquired him from San Francisco in 1962, and he was a starter for one season. Dallas traded him to Cleveland in 1963. Clark later became a head coach with the 49ers and Lions.

Syd Kitson, G, Wake Forest, 1984

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played less than a full season with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Kitson was a part-time starter with the Packers before being released. Dallas signed him, but he only played one game with the Cowboys.

Ralph Neely, G/T, Oklahoma, 1965-77

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: He made two Pro Bowls and three All-Pro teams.

Longevity: Neely played 13 seasons with the Cowboys, despite a variety of injuries.

Intangibles: Neely was the anchor of the Dallas offensive line for many years. He played both right tackle and left tackle and started in four of the five Dallas Super Bowls of the 1970s. He was nicknamed “Rotten,” apparently because he was so mean to rookies.

Danny Noonan, DL, Nebraska, 1987-92

Statistics: Noonan recorded 15 sacks with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played six seasons in Dallas before being released during the 1992 season.

Intangibles: Taken 12th in the 1987 draft, Noonan was the highest Dallas pick since Tony Dorsett in 1977. Noonan became a starter by 1988, but injuries slowed his career quite a bit. Though not a bust on the same level as Kevin Brooks, Billy Cannon, or Rod Hill, he never came close to becoming a great defensive lineman.

Kurt Ploeger, DL, Gustavus Adolphus, 1986

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played less than a full season with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Dallas drafted Ploeger in 1985, but he was injured that season. He played three games with Dallas in 1986 before he was released. He also played with the Packers and Vikings.

Steve Wright, T, Northern Iowa, 1981-82

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Wright was waived by Dallas in 1982, but he managed to stay in the league. He developed into a starter for the Colts and Raiders (he also had a stint in the USFL) and enjoyed a lengthy career.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #73.

Greatest #73

  • Larry Allen (92%, 110 Votes)
  • Ralph Neely (8%, 10 Votes)
  • Kurt Ploeger (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Dave Burnette (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Monte Clark (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Syd Kitson (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Danny Noonan (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Steve Wright (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 120

Loading ... Loading ...

My Vote: Allen

Larry AllenThis one is not quite a clear-cut as some may think, given that Neely was an outstanding lineman for many years. However, this one should go to Allen, who is one of the best linemen in NFL history. Very few professional athletes have been stronger, few linemen have been quicker, and even fewer linemen have been as versatile as Allen.

Neely was a better tackle than most and was a great complement to Rayfield Wright during the 1970s. The others were mostly backups or– in the case of Noonan– at least a semi-bust.

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #73

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #73

Eight players have worn #73 for the Cowboys. This includes seven offensive linemen and one defensive lineman.

Larry Allen, G/T, Sonoma State, 1994-05

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: Allen played in ten Pro Bowls as a Cowboy and made six All-Pro teams. He will almost certainly be inducted into the Ring of Honor and Hall of Fame.

Longevity: He played 12 seasons in Dallas. He appears to have retired after playing two seasons in San Francisco.

Intangibles: Very few linemen have earned as much attention as Allen. His strength is legendary, as was his ability to move for a man his size. He played four different positions on the offensive line during his career in Dallas, and he excelled at every position.

Dave Burnette, T, Central Arkansas, 1987

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played in one replacement game in 1987.

Intangibles: He was originally as 12th round draft choice by the Colts in 1985.

Monte Clark, T, Southern California, 1962

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Clark played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Dallas acquired him from San Francisco in 1962, and he was a starter for one season. Dallas traded him to Cleveland in 1963. Clark later became a head coach with the 49ers and Lions.

Syd Kitson, G, Wake Forest, 1984

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played less than a full season with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Kitson was a part-time starter with the Packers before being released. Dallas signed him, but he only played one game with the Cowboys.

Ralph Neely, G/T, Oklahoma, 1965-77

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: He made two Pro Bowls and three All-Pro teams.

Longevity: Neely played 13 seasons with the Cowboys, despite a variety of injuries.

Intangibles: Neely was the anchor of the Dallas offensive line for many years. He played both right tackle and left tackle and started in four of the five Dallas Super Bowls of the 1970s. He was nicknamed “Rotten,” apparently because he was so mean to rookies.

Danny Noonan, DL, Nebraska, 1987-92

Statistics: Noonan recorded 15 sacks with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played six seasons in Dallas before being released during the 1992 season.

Intangibles: Taken 12th in the 1987 draft, Noonan was the highest Dallas pick since Tony Dorsett in 1977. Noonan became a starter by 1988, but injuries slowed his career quite a bit. Though not a bust on the same level as Kevin Brooks, Billy Cannon, or Rod Hill, he never came close to becoming a great defensive lineman.

Kurt Ploeger, DL, Gustavus Adolphus, 1986

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played less than a full season with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Dallas drafted Ploeger in 1985, but he was injured that season. He played three games with Dallas in 1986 before he was released. He also played with the Packers and Vikings.

Steve Wright, T, Northern Iowa, 1981-82

Statistics: n/a

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Wright was waived by Dallas in 1982, but he managed to stay in the league. He developed into a starter for the Colts and Raiders (he also had a stint in the USFL) and enjoyed a lengthy career.

Poll

Here is your chance to vote for the greatest player to wear #73.

Greatest #73

  • Larry Allen (92%, 110 Votes)
  • Ralph Neely (8%, 10 Votes)
  • Kurt Ploeger (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Dave Burnette (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Monte Clark (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Syd Kitson (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Danny Noonan (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Steve Wright (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 120

Loading ... Loading ...

My Vote: Allen

Larry AllenThis one is not quite a clear-cut as some may think, given that Neely was an outstanding lineman for many years. However, this one should go to Allen, who is one of the best linemen in NFL history. Very few professional athletes have been stronger, few linemen have been quicker, and even fewer linemen have been as versatile as Allen.

Neely was a better tackle than most and was a great complement to Rayfield Wright during the 1970s. The others were mostly backups or– in the case of Noonan– at least a semi-bust.

Preseason Game #1: Chargers 31, Cowboys 17

Felix Jones, Dallas Cowboys

The Cowboys looked good on their opening offensive and defensive series against San Diego in the first preseason game on Saturday night. However, poor special teams coverage, penalties in the secondary, and turnovers were very costly, as the Chargers ran out to a 24-10 halftime lead. Dallas had a good drive in the second half but could not make a dent into the San Diego lead, as the Chargers won 31-17.

The Cowboys opened up the game with a good defensive stand. Roy Williams recorded a tackle, Tank Johnson sacked Philip Rivers, and Kevin Burnett made a nice tackle on third down. The first-team offense looked very sharp, going 54 yards in eight plays to take a 7-0 lead. The defense held again on the ensuing possession, but Danny Amendola fumbled the punt. The Chargers scored on a Jacob Hester run four plays later.

Many of the Dallas starters came out after that series. Early in the second quarter, Brad Johnson was intercepted by Quintin Jammer. This led to a Darren Sproles touchdown.

Dallas was inefficient for most of the rest of the first half. Brad Johnson seldom threw the ball past ten yards, and the Cowboys had three consecutive three-and-out series. However, the Cowboys managed a long drive at the end of the first half, thanks to a 28-yard catch-and-run by rookie Felix Jones. Dallas kicked a field goal to cut the lead to 24-10.

Richard Bartel led Dallas throughout the second half. Miles Austin and Tashard Choice both had some big plays, and Choice scored on a nice-looking 19-yard touchdown run.

NFL Game Center: Box Score

Highlights

Breakdown by Position

Quarterbacks

* Tony Romo led one drive, which resulted in a touchdown. He went three-for-three for 33 yards.

* Johnson opened the second quarter with an interception. It was due to a miscommunication with Patrick Crayton.

* Johnson threw mostly short and was not very effective.

* Richard Bartel did not look bad in the second half, though he did not show that he could throw the ball downfield.

Running Backs

* Marion Barber ran hard in limited action. He bounced one play to the outside for a nice gain. Later in the drive, he broke a 15-yard run.

* Felix Jones showed great speed on a 19-yard run at the end of the 1st quarter.

* Jones showed breakaway ability. He has nice moves with great speed. You can see a video of his highlights here:

* Deon Anderson, who was injured much of last year, had a touchdown run.

* Choice ran hard and was generally impressive.

Receivers

* Patrick Crayton caught two third-down passes over the middle.

* Isaiah Stanback ran a pretty good reverse in the second quarter. He only caught one pass for five yards, however.

* Miles Austin made a few catches in the second quarter. He had an 18-yard reception on a third-down play in the second quarter.

* Austin really picked things up in the second half. He made a great play on a 3rd-and-3, breaking a tackle and gaining 21 yards. Later in the drive, he made a 12-yard reception on a 4th-and-2 play.

* Amendola saw action at receiver in the fourth quarter. He did not make a catch, though.

Tight Ends

* Jason Witten caught the first pass of the game and had two receptions overall.

* Martellus Bennett had an ugly drop in the second quarter.

* Bennett missed a block on a blitz in the second quarter. Shaun Phillips nearly sacked Brad Johnson and broke up a third down play.

* Tony Curtis had three receptions. He had a very strong preseason in 2007.

Linemen

* Pat McQuistan looked terrible on a second quarter play, giving up a sack.

* The line looked pretty good in the second half. Cory Proctor and James Marten had some good blocks (especially on Choice’s 19-yard touchdown run), and the line gave Bartel pretty good time.

Defensive Line

* Tank Johnson recorded a sack in the first San Diego drive.

* Marcus Spears broke up a play in the second quarter.

* The backups, including Marcus Smith and Remi Ayodele, did not look very good on a few plays, though they combined for five tackles.

Linebackers

* Zach Thomas was all over the place. He recorded two tackles and an assist.

* Kevin Burnett made a nice tackle early in the game on Jacob Hester. However, Hester just about ran Burnett over in the second quarter. In the second half, Burnett whiffed on a tackle on Jacob Hester.

* DeMarcus Ware and Greg Ellis got good pressure on Billy Volek on a third down play in the second quarter. Chris Canty nearly got a sack.

* Bobby Carpenter had a pretty active game, recording six tackles with one assist.

Secondary

* Mike Jenkins broke up a pass in the first quarter. He closed in very quickly on Chris Chambers.

* Ken Hamlin was called for pass interference near the Dallas goalline.

* Pacman Jones saw action starting in the second quarter. On his first play, Chris Chambers caught a 21-yard pass. He later missed a tackle on a screen pass to Darren Sproles. In the second half, Jones completely whiffed on a run by Jacob Hester, who than ran for 21 yards. On the same drive, he was called for a pass interference at the Dallas 4.

Special Teams Coverage

* Nick Folk‘s opening kickoff was downed for a touchback.

* Deon Anderson made a good tackle on Sproles after Dallas scored a first quarter touchdown.

* Terrible coverage by the punt team led to a 25-yard Sproles return in the second quarter. Julius Crosslin lost his helmet but ran down field anyway. Strange play.

* The punt coverage got worse near the end of the first half. Players did not stay in their lanes, and M. Jones got around the corner for 16 yards. It led to a touchdown that gave San Diego a 24-7 lead.

Return Teams

* Amendola returned one punt for 12 yards. However, he fumbled a return, which led to a San Diego touchdown.

* Alonzo Coleman and Isaiah Stanback returned kicks. Neither looked very good.

* At halftime, Jerry Jones noted that Felix Jones and Pacman Jones could be involved in the return game, though neither were against San Diego.

Kicking

* Mat McBriar was pretty solid. Rookie Jay Ottovegio also saw action in the second half.

* Nick Folk had deep kickoffs. He made a 35-yard field goal at the end of the second quarter.

Preseason Game #1: Chargers 31, Cowboys 17

Felix Jones, Dallas Cowboys

The Cowboys looked good on their opening offensive and defensive series against San Diego in the first preseason game on Saturday night. However, poor special teams coverage, penalties in the secondary, and turnovers were very costly, as the Chargers ran out to a 24-10 halftime lead. Dallas had a good drive in the second half but could not make a dent into the San Diego lead, as the Chargers won 31-17.

The Cowboys opened up the game with a good defensive stand. Roy Williams recorded a tackle, Tank Johnson sacked Philip Rivers, and Kevin Burnett made a nice tackle on third down. The first-team offense looked very sharp, going 54 yards in eight plays to take a 7-0 lead. The defense held again on the ensuing possession, but Danny Amendola fumbled the punt. The Chargers scored on a Jacob Hester run four plays later.

Many of the Dallas starters came out after that series. Early in the second quarter, Brad Johnson was intercepted by Quintin Jammer. This led to a Darren Sproles touchdown.

Dallas was inefficient for most of the rest of the first half. Brad Johnson seldom threw the ball past ten yards, and the Cowboys had three consecutive three-and-out series. However, the Cowboys managed a long drive at the end of the first half, thanks to a 28-yard catch-and-run by rookie Felix Jones. Dallas kicked a field goal to cut the lead to 24-10.

Richard Bartel led Dallas throughout the second half. Miles Austin and Tashard Choice both had some big plays, and Choice scored on a nice-looking 19-yard touchdown run.

NFL Game Center: Box Score

Highlights

Breakdown by Position

Quarterbacks

* Tony Romo led one drive, which resulted in a touchdown. He went three-for-three for 33 yards.

* Johnson opened the second quarter with an interception. It was due to a miscommunication with Patrick Crayton.

* Johnson threw mostly short and was not very effective.

* Richard Bartel did not look bad in the second half, though he did not show that he could throw the ball downfield.

Running Backs

* Marion Barber ran hard in limited action. He bounced one play to the outside for a nice gain. Later in the drive, he broke a 15-yard run.

* Felix Jones showed great speed on a 19-yard run at the end of the 1st quarter.

* Jones showed breakaway ability. He has nice moves with great speed. You can see a video of his highlights here:

* Deon Anderson, who was injured much of last year, had a touchdown run.

* Choice ran hard and was generally impressive.

Receivers

* Patrick Crayton caught two third-down passes over the middle.

* Isaiah Stanback ran a pretty good reverse in the second quarter. He only caught one pass for five yards, however.

* Miles Austin made a few catches in the second quarter. He had an 18-yard reception on a third-down play in the second quarter.

* Austin really picked things up in the second half. He made a great play on a 3rd-and-3, breaking a tackle and gaining 21 yards. Later in the drive, he made a 12-yard reception on a 4th-and-2 play.

* Amendola saw action at receiver in the fourth quarter. He did not make a catch, though.

Tight Ends

* Jason Witten caught the first pass of the game and had two receptions overall.

* Martellus Bennett had an ugly drop in the second quarter.

* Bennett missed a block on a blitz in the second quarter. Shaun Phillips nearly sacked Brad Johnson and broke up a third down play.

* Tony Curtis had three receptions. He had a very strong preseason in 2007.

Linemen

* Pat McQuistan looked terrible on a second quarter play, giving up a sack.

* The line looked pretty good in the second half. Cory Proctor and James Marten had some good blocks (especially on Choice’s 19-yard touchdown run), and the line gave Bartel pretty good time.

Defensive Line

* Tank Johnson recorded a sack in the first San Diego drive.

* Marcus Spears broke up a play in the second quarter.

* The backups, including Marcus Smith and Remi Ayodele, did not look very good on a few plays, though they combined for five tackles.

Linebackers

* Zach Thomas was all over the place. He recorded two tackles and an assist.

* Kevin Burnett made a nice tackle early in the game on Jacob Hester. However, Hester just about ran Burnett over in the second quarter. In the second half, Burnett whiffed on a tackle on Jacob Hester.

* DeMarcus Ware and Greg Ellis got good pressure on Billy Volek on a third down play in the second quarter. Chris Canty nearly got a sack.

* Bobby Carpenter had a pretty active game, recording six tackles with one assist.

Secondary

* Mike Jenkins broke up a pass in the first quarter. He closed in very quickly on Chris Chambers.

* Ken Hamlin was called for pass interference near the Dallas goalline.

* Pacman Jones saw action starting in the second quarter. On his first play, Chris Chambers caught a 21-yard pass. He later missed a tackle on a screen pass to Darren Sproles. In the second half, Jones completely whiffed on a run by Jacob Hester, who than ran for 21 yards. On the same drive, he was called for a pass interference at the Dallas 4.

Special Teams Coverage

* Nick Folk‘s opening kickoff was downed for a touchback.

* Deon Anderson made a good tackle on Sproles after Dallas scored a first quarter touchdown.

* Terrible coverage by the punt team led to a 25-yard Sproles return in the second quarter. Julius Crosslin lost his helmet but ran down field anyway. Strange play.

* The punt coverage got worse near the end of the first half. Players did not stay in their lanes, and M. Jones got around the corner for 16 yards. It led to a touchdown that gave San Diego a 24-7 lead.

Return Teams

* Amendola returned one punt for 12 yards. However, he fumbled a return, which led to a San Diego touchdown.

* Alonzo Coleman and Isaiah Stanback returned kicks. Neither looked very good.

* At halftime, Jerry Jones noted that Felix Jones and Pacman Jones could be involved in the return game, though neither were against San Diego.

Kicking

* Mat McBriar was pretty solid. Rookie Jay Ottovegio also saw action in the second half.

* Nick Folk had deep kickoffs. He made a 35-yard field goal at the end of the second quarter.