Oddsmaking in June: Offensive Rookie of the Year

Felix JonesIf you are the type who love to collect promo codes, June must be your creative time of year. One website right now offers only a handful of betting options, like CompareTheBets’ List of Promo Codes, through these I’ve found these options to be entertaining/interesting in and of themselves.

For Offensive Rookie of the Year, two Cowboys’ rookies made the list. Felix Jones is an 18 to 1 bet, while Tashard Choice is a 90 to 1 bet. Choice actually has the longest odds of the 31 rookies on this list. Here are these odds:

Darren McFadden (OAK): 3/1
Kevin Smith (DET): 6/1
Jonathan Stewart (CAR): 13/2
Matt Forte (CHI): 13/2
Matt Ryan (ATL): 12/1
Rashard Mendenhall (PIT): 12/1
Felix Jones (DAL): 18/1
Ray Rice (BAL): 20/1
James Hardy (BUF): 20/1
Limas Sweed (PIT): 20/1
Joe Flacco (BAL): 25/1
Devin Thomas (WAS): 25/1
Steve Slaton (HOU): 25/1
Chris Johnson (TEN): 30/1
Jamaal Charles (KC): 30/1
Jake Long (MIA): 30/1
DeSean Jackson (PHI): 35/1
Chad Henne (MIA): 35/1
Malcolm Kelly (WAS): 35/1
John Carlson (SEA): 40/1
Eddie Royal (DEN): 40/1
Brian Brohm (GB): 40/1
Dustin Keller (NYJ): 45/1
Mario Manningham (NYG): 45/1
John David Booty (MIN): 50/1
Early Doucet (ARI): 55/1
Earl Bennett (CHI): 55/1
Jacob Hester (SD): 65/1
Jerome Simpson (CIN): 65/1
Donnie Avery (STL): 70/1
Tashard Choice (DAL): 90/1

If you would seriously consider betting on anyone other than a skills player, consider this: of the 41 offensive rookies of the year since the Associated Press first gave the award in 1967, 31 selections were running backs, seven were wide receivers, and three were quarterbacks. Given this, I think I’d take my 90 to 1 chances with Choice before I’d bet anything on Jake Long.

Then again, I don’t bet.

As for Cowboys who have won the AP Offensive Rookie of the Year Award, we have three:

1969: Calvin Hill, Running Back
1977: Tony Dorsett, Running Back
1990: Emmitt Smith, Running Back

Recap: Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers, 1-40

Here is a recap of the leaders of the polls for Greatest Players by Their Jersey Numbers thus far.

Number Name Pos. College Years
1 Mat McBriar (62%) P Hawaii 2004-present
2 Lin Elliott (65%) K Texas Tech 1992-1993
3 Billy Cundiff (29%) K Drake 2002-2005
4 Mike Saxon (76%) P San Diego St. 1985-1992
5 Clint Stoerner (80%) QB Arkansas 2000-2002
6 Nick Folk (94%) K Arizona 2007-present
7 Steve Beuerlein (70%) QB Notre Dame 1991-1992
8 Troy Aikman (91%) QB UCLA 1989-2000
9 Tony Romo (98%) QB Eastern Ill. 2003-present
10 Ron Widby (76%) P Tennessee 1968-1971
11 Danny White (96%) QB/P Arizona State 1976-1988
12 Roger Staubach (96%) QB Navy 1969-1979
13 Jerry Rhome (86%) QB Tulsa 1965-1968
14 Craig Morton (74%) QB California 1965-1974
15 Toni Fritsch (77%) K Vienna, Austria 1971-1973, 1975
16 Vinny Testaverde (65%) QB Miami 2004
17 Don Meredith (88%) QB SMU 1960-1968
18 Chris Boniol (65%) K Louisiana Tech 1994-1996
19 Lance Rentzel (37%) WR Oklahoma 1967-1970
20 Mel Renfro (88%) DB Oregon 1964-1977
21 Deion Sanders (96%) DB Florida St. 1995-1999
22 Emmitt Smith (91%) RB Florida 1990-2002
23 Robert Williams (36%) DB Baylor 1987-1993
24 Everson Walls (81%) DB Grambling 1981-1989
25 Pat Watkins (36%) DB Florida St. 2006-present
26 Kevin Smith (31%) DB Texas A&M 1992-1999
27 Ron Fellows (39%) DB Missouri 1981-1986
28 Darren Woodson (100%) DB Arizona St. 1992-2003
29 Kenneth Gant (61%) DB Albany St. 1990-1994
30 Dan Reeves (78%) RB South Carolina 1965-1972
31 Roy Williams (65%) S Oklahoma 2002-present
32 Walt Garrison (64%) RB Oklahoma St. 1966-1974
33 Tony Dorsett (95%) RB Pitt 1977-1987
34 Herschel Walker (56%) RB Georgia 1986-89, 1996-97
35 Calvin Hill (90%) RB Yale 1969-1974
36 Vince Albritton (42%) S Washington 1984-1991
37 James Washington (94%) S UCLA 1990-1994
38 Sam Baker (43%) P/K Oregon St. 1962-1963
39 Lousaka Polite (53%) RB Pitt 2004-2006
40 Bill Bates (99%) S Tennessee 1983-1997

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #40

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #40

Six players have worn #40, including three defensive backs, two running backs, and a receiver.

Bill Bates

Bill Bates, S, Tennessee, 1983-97

Statistics: Bates recorded 667 tackles with the Cowboys, as well as 14 interceptions.

Accolades: He was named to the Pro Bowl once.

Longevity: Bates played 15 seasons in the NFL, all with Dallas.

Intangibles: Bates was nothing short of a legend with the Cowboys, excelling beyond his talent level. He was the first special teams player to be named to the Pro Bowl for his work there, as opposed to defense. He later became a starter and remained a key contributor through the 1990s. The “intangibles” category of this survey was designed with Bates in mind.

Bobby Joe Conrad, WR, Texas A&M, 1969

Statistics: Conrad caught four passes for 74 yards with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None with Dallas, though he ranked seventh all time in receptions when he joined the Cowboys in 1969.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Conrad enjoyed a long career with the Cardinals but saw little action with the Cowboys.

Jim Harris, S, Oklahoma, 1961

Statistics: Harris recorded two interceptions with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None with Dallas.

Longevity: He played one season with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Harris was the subject of a court battle after the Rams had apparently traded his rights to the Cowboys in 1960, but Harris signed with the Dallas Texans. A court later held in favor of the Cowboys, and he played one season with the team.

Eric Hurt, CB, Cal. State San Jose, 1980

Statistics: Hurt averaged 17.4 yards per return with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season with Dallas.

Intangibles: He suffered through a series of injuries in his only season in the NFL.

Jim Stiger, RB, Washington, 1963-65

Statistics: Stiger rushed for 470 yards and scored two touchdowns with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played three seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Stiger was a part time starter in the early 1960s before being traded to the Rams in 1965.

Les Strayhorn, RB, East Carolina, 1973-74

Statistics: Strayhorn rushed for 128 yards with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: A 17th-round pick in 1973, Strayhorn saw limited action and retired after two seasons.

Poll

Here are the results of the poll for this number:

Greatest #40

  • Bill Bates (99%, 201 Votes)
  • Bobby Joe Conrad (0%, 1 Votes)
  • Les Strayhorn (0%, 1 Votes)
  • Jim Harris (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Eric Hurt (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Jim Stiger (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 203

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My Vote: Bates

There is simply no doubt about this one. Anyone who knows anything about the Dallas Cowboys knows the story of Bill Bates. For the few who don’t, here are a couple of very good clips that feature him:

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #39

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #39

If you thought some of the other numbers were bad, we’ve now reached perhaps the worst jersey number in franchise history. Six players have worn #39, including five running backs and one defensive back.

Derrick Gainer, RB, Florida A&M, 1992-93

Statistics: Gainer gained 29 yards rushing with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played for parts of two seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Gainer’s biggest contribution came in the 1992 playoffs when he scored a touchdown against the Eagles. He was the otherwise used as a special teams player.

E.J. Jones, RB, Kansas, 1987

Statistics: Jones rushed for 7 yards as a replacement player in 1987.

Accolades: Replacement player.

Longevity: Replacement player.

Intangibles: Replacement player.

Ryan Neufeld, FB, UCLA, 1999

Statistics: Neufeld did not record any statistics of note with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: He later played for the Jaguars and most recently with the Bills, seeing most of his action with Buffalo.

Lousaka Polite, FB, Pittsburgh, 2004-06

Statistics: Polite caught 12 passes for 97 yards and also rushed for 26 yards with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played three seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Polite was a below-average blocking fullback with the Cowboys. He spent last season with Chicago but played very little.

Broderick Sargent, FB, Baylor, 1989

Statistics: Sargent rushed for 87 yards with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: He started five games in 1989, but that was his last NFL season. He later played in the Arena Football League.

Donald Smith, S, Liberty, 1991

Statistics: Smith recorded a total of two special teams tackles with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He dressed for three games with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: He was a 10th round pick by Minnesota in 1990 but did very little in the NFL.

Poll

Here are the results of the poll for this number:

Greatest #39

  • Lousaka Polite (53%, 35 Votes)
  • Derrick Gainer (39%, 26 Votes)
  • Broderick Sargent (5%, 3 Votes)
  • E.J. Jones (2%, 1 Votes)
  • Donald Smith (2%, 1 Votes)
  • Ryan Neufeld (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 66

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If you still want to vote, please make a comment below.

My Vote: Gainer

Derrick GainerGiven that we really don’t have any good choices in this list, I am left with two factors: (1) do I go with a player who is an alumnus of my current employer (see Robert Williams and Thomas Everett; but see Ron Francis)?, or (2) do I go with a player who scored a touchdown in a playoff game, of which I happen to have a copy? For purposes of showing said game clip, I’m going with Gainer.

Sargent deserves consideration because he actually started a few games at fullback. The others were minor role players who accomplished very little with Dallas.

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #38

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #38

Seven players have worn #38, including four defensive backs, two running backs, and a kicker.

Note: Roy Williams will wear #38 beginning in 2008. I included him with #31, so he is not listed here.

Sam Baker, P/K, Oregon State, 1962-63

Statistics: Baker averaged 44.7 yards per punt and made 48.9% of his field goals.

Accolades: He made the Pro Bowl once with Dallas and otherwise a total of four times.

Longevity: Of his 15 years in the NFL, Baker played two in Dallas.

Intangibles: Baker was a great punter, a good kicker, and also a running back. He was known for raising hell off the field, which is why Dallas traded him to Philadelphia prior to the 1964 season.

Obvious Note: This Sam Baker should not be confused with USC tackle Sam Baker, who was selected by Atlanta in this year’s draft.

Ron Francis, CB, Baylor, 1987-90

Statistics: Francis had four interceptions with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played four seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: The Baylor graduate was a second round pick in 1987 but started just 17 games during his career. Many of his problems were due to injury.

Chris Hall, S, East Carolina, 1993

Statistics: None.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas, mostly on the practice squad.

Intangibles: The former ninth round pick was cut in 1992 but brought back in 1993, which was his only season as a pro.

Duane Hawthorne, CB, Northern Illinois, 1999-02

Statistics: Hawthorne had six interceptions with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played four seasons in Dallas before being released.

Intangibles: Hawthorne developed into a starter by 2001, his third season in the league, but he was released during the following season.

David Lang, RB, Northern Arizona, 1995

Statistics: Lang had one carry for seven yards with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Lang was a part-time starter with the Rams before joining the Cowboys, but he did very little in Dallas.

Lynn Scott, S, Northwestern Oklahoma, 2001-05

Statistics: Scott had 41 tackles and one interception with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played five seasons with Dallas.

Intangibles: Scott started several games in 2004, the team’s first without Darren Woodson. However, he lacked speed and was never considered a long-term solution at strong or free safety.

John Williams, FB, Wisconsin, 1985

Statistics: Williams gained 40 yards in 13 carried with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played in part of one season with Dallas.

Intangibles: Williams was once a USFL player before he signed with Dallas. He later played with Seattle, New Orleans, and Indianapolis.

Poll

Here are the results of the poll for this number:

Greatest #38

  • Sam Baker (44%, 36 Votes)
  • Lynn Scott (27%, 22 Votes)
  • Ron Francis (15%, 12 Votes)
  • Duane Hawthorne (15%, 12 Votes)
  • David Lang (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Chris Hall (0%, 0 Votes)
  • John Williams (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 82

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My Vote: Baker

Sam BakerMy paycheck might tell me to go with Francis, but Baker is the only Pro Bowler on this list. His 45.4 yards-per-punt average in 1962 stood along as a record until Mat McBriar broke it in 2006. McBriar and Baker are currently tied for the highest career average with Dallas, with both averaging 44.7 yards-per-punt.

Francis, Hawthorne, and Scott really never did much, though each started a few games.

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #37

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #37

Nine players have worn #37, including five defensive backs and four running backs.

Phil Clark, DB, Northwestern, 1967-69

Statistics: Clark recorded three interceptions with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played three seasons with Dallas.

Intangibles: Clark showed promise during the late 1960s. However, after a disappointing 1969 season, along with the signing of several new defensive backs in 1970, he became expendable. He was traded that year to Chicago.

Perry Lee Dunn, RB, Mississippi, 1964-65

Statistics: Dunn rushed for 274 yards and three touchdowns with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Dunn was a converted college quarterback who saw some action in 1964 and 1965. However, he left for Atlanta after the Cowboys acquired Walt Garrison.

Jim Jensen, RB, Iowa, 1976

Statistics: He averaged 24.1 yards per kickoff return with Dallas.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Not to be confused with the Miami Dolphins’ Jim Jensen, who played during the 1980s, the Jensen who played for Dallas had few opportunities to shine. Prior to the 1977 season, he was traded to Denver.

Dennis Morgan, RB, Western Illinois, 1974

Statistics: Morgan averaged 15.1 yards per punt return and 23.5 yards per kickoff return for the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Known as “Strawberry” due to his red hair, Morgan tied an NFL record when he returned a punt 98 yards for a touchdown against the Cardinals. He was traded to Philadelphia the following season.

Ike Thomas, CB, Bishop, 1971

Statistics: Thomas averaged 42.1 yards per kickoff return on seven returns.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Thomas had only seven kickoff returns for Dallas, but two of them went for touchdowns– quite an amazing feat. He was not a good defensive back, however, and was traded to the Packers in 1972.

Lee Vaughn, DB, Wyoming, 1997

Statistics: He did not record a stat with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He was on the practice squad for one season.

Intangibles: Nothing to mention here.

James Washington, S, UCLA, 1990-94

Statistics: Washington recorded 14 interceptions with the Cowboys.

Accolades: If there were a co-MVP of Super Bowl XXVIII, he would be it.

Longevity: He played five seasons with Dallas.

Intangibles: Washington’s performance in SB XXVIII is legendary. He caused one fumble, returned another for a touchdown, and recorded a key interception that led to the game-clinching touchdown in the fourth quarter. Originally signed as a Plan B free agent from the Rams, Washington started 58 games at both strong and free safety.

Gerald White, FB, Michigan, 1987

Statistics: White caught five passes for 46 yards for the Cowboys.

Accolades: Replacement player.

Longevity: Replacement player.

Intangibles: Replacement player.

Tyrone Williams, CB, Nebraska, 2004

Statistics: Williams recorded one sack and seven tackles with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played in part of one season with Dallas.

Intangibles: Williams was a starter for the Packers for several years and signed with Dallas in 2004. He was injured that season after playing in three games, and he never played again.

Poll

Here are the results of the poll for this number:

Greatest #37

  • James Washington (93%, 108 Votes)
  • Lee Vaughn (3%, 3 Votes)
  • Phil Clark (2%, 2 Votes)
  • Ike Thomas (2%, 2 Votes)
  • Jim Jensen (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Perry Lee Dunn (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Dennis Morgan (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Gerald White (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Tyrone Williams (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 116

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My Vote: Washington

James WashingtonReally no contest here. Washington was a quality starter throughout most of the glory days of the early 1990s. His performance in SB XXVIII was more important than was Larry Brown’s in SB XXX, given that Washington made the plays that turned the game around, while Brown was mostly in the right place at the right time on his two famous interceptions.

My Favorite Piece of Spam

I’m really getting used to receiving all sorts of spam on this site, either through email comments, post comments, or otherwise. The one I received today has somehow become my all-time favorite, though, which may tell more about my sense of humor than I care to reveal. But here it goes…

Spam

[If you can’t see this, it is an email from “Louisa Winkler,” who informs me that “your life is crap”]

Something about someone taking the time to write an email to me to tell me that my life is crap…is pretty damn funny.

So this now leaves me wondering whether my life is crap because of the Greatest Cowboys by Jersey Number series, or perhaps because of my stint in the news regarding academic tenure at a certain Baptist university in the South (see also here, here, here, here, and more…). I certainly hope it’s not the series about the jersey numbers.

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #36

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #36

Nine players have worn #36, including two defensive backs, six running backs, and a tight end/kicker.

Vince Albritton, S, Washington, 1984-91

Statistics: Albritton had one interception and three sacks during his career. He recorded a career-high 111 tackles in 1989, he only year as a starter.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Albritton played eight season for the Cowboys, mostly on special teams.

Intangibles:He was mostly a special teams player during his career. He won the starting job at strong safety during the dismal 1989 season, but he suffered through some injuries after that and was never again a full-time starter.

Darian Barnes, FB, Hampton, 2004

Statistics: Barnes caught ten passes for 59 yards with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He lasted one season in Dallas, starting ten games.

Intangibles: Barnes was a serviceable blocking back and not a bad pass receiver. He most recently played for the Jets.

Dick Bielski, TE/K, Maryland, 1960-61

Statistics: Bielski caught 30 passes for 415 yards with the Cowboys. He also made six of nine field goal attempts.

Accolades: He was named to the Pro Bowl in 1961.

Longevity: He lasted two seasons in Dallas.

Intangibles: Dallas picked up Bielski in the 1960 expansion draft from the Philadelphia Eagles. He had a fine year in 1961, catching 26 passes for 377 yards. Dallas traded him to Baltimore the following season, however.

Larry Brinson, RB, Florida, 1977-79

Statistics: Brinson rushed for 172 yards with three touchdowns with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played three seasons with Dallas.

Intangibles: Brinson was originally signed as an undrafted free agent. He was originally released during training camp in 1978 but came back to the team later in the season. An injured derailed his 1979 season, and he finished his career with Seattle in 1980.

Quincy Butler, CB, TCU, 2006

Statistics: Butler had no statistics of note.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He has seen action in one game with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Butler has been a practice squad player for two seasons. He is still on the roster, but maybe not for long.

Dominique Ross, RB, Valdosta State, 1995-96

Statistics: Ross dressed for a few games but never recorded a statistic.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He was on the roster for two seasons.

Intangibles: Ross was mostly a practice squad player who dressed for a total of three games during a two-year period.

Tarik Smith, RB, California, 1998-99

Statistics: Smith recorded no statistics.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He was on the Cowboys’ roster for two seasons but never appeared in a game.

Intangibles: Not much to note, except that he was named to the Oak Park (Cal.) Hall of Fame in 2003.

Tony Taylor, RB, Northwestern Louisiana, 2001

Statistics: Taylor had one career attempt for the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He saw action in one game for the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Not much to note.

Joe Williams, RB, Wyoming, 1971

Statistics: He rushed for 67 yards with one touchdown for the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: After spending a season on the taxi squad in 1970, Williams saw limited action in 1971. He finished his career after playing a season with New Orleans.

Poll

Here are the results of the poll for this number:

Greatest #36

  • Vince Albritton (45%, 37 Votes)
  • Dick Bielski (38%, 31 Votes)
  • Quincy Butler (7%, 6 Votes)
  • Larry Brinson (5%, 4 Votes)
  • Darian Barnes (2%, 2 Votes)
  • Tony Taylor (2%, 2 Votes)
  • Dominique Ross (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Tarik Smith (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Joe Williams (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 82

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My Vote: Bielski

Dick BielskiTalk about limited choices. Bielski is the only Pro Bowler on this list, which earned him my vote. He also had multiple duties, serving as a kicker in addition to his job as tight end.

Of the others, Albritton deserves some recognition for his longevity, but he really never did much to stand out. The others were either spot players or barely played at all.

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #35

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #35

Twelve players have worn #35, including three defensive backs, eight running backs, and a receiver.

Jimmy Armstrong, DB, Appalachian State, 1987

Statistics: He started two games as a replacement player.

Accolades: Replacement player.

Longevity: Replacement player.

Intangibles: Replacement player.

Update: Thanks to the blog AppFan, which follows Appalachian State’s athletics, we know a bit more about Armstrong:

Armstrong wore No. 25 at App State from 1983-86. He was a hero in Sparky Woods first win as coach, and later was an all-conference DB (1986). He “played” just that one “season” in the NFL.

Robert Chancey, RB, No College, 1999

Statistics: He gained 57 yards for the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played in three games in Dallas.

Intangibles: Chancey gained all of his yards come in one game against Green Bay in 1999. He was gone after one season.

Wendell Davis, CB, Oklahoma, 1996-99

Statistics: Nothing worth noting.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played four seasons with Dallas.

Intangibles: Davis was mostly a special teams player with the Cowboys.

Pete Gent, WR/TE, Michigan State, 1964-68

Statistics: Gent caught 68 passes for 989 yards with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None as a player.

Longevity: He lasted five seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: As the author of North Dallas Forty, Gent is better known than many of his more talented teammates. A former college basketball player, Gent developed into a serviceable receiver, mostly as a backup.

Calvin Hill, RB, Yale, 1969-74

Statistics: Hill rushed for 5,009 yards and scored 39 touchdowns with Dallas.

Accolades: He was named to the Pro Bowl four times and was an All-Pro once.

Longevity: He played six years with Dallas.

Intangibles: Hill was a triumph of the Cowboys’ computerized scouting service when he was selected in the first round in 1969. He was a great athlete and in 1972 became the first player in team history to rush for more than 1,000 yards in a season. He left Dallas to join the World Football League after the 1974 season.

Walt Kowalczyk, RB, Michigan State, 1960

Statistics: Kowalczyk rushed for 156 yards with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one year in Dallas.

Intangibles: Dallas picked up Kowalczyk via trade for the inaugural 1960 season, but he left for Oakland after one season.

Scott Laidlaw, RB, Stanford, 1975-79

Statistics: Laidlaw rushed for 997 yards with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played five seasons with Dallas.

Intangibles: Laidlaw was Robert Newhouse’s backup for most of his career in Dallas. His most active year was 1976 when Newhouse suffered an injury.

J.W. Lockett, RB, Central Oklahoma, 1961-62

Statistics: Lockett rushed for 304 yards with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played in less than two full seasons with Dallas.

Intangibles: Lockett was a converted tight end who saw quite a bit of action for Dallas in 1961 and 1962. He later played for the Colts and Redskins.

Jason McKie, FB, Temple, 2002

Statistics: McKie caught one pass for the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He was active for one game with Dallas.

Intangibles: McKie has developed into a part-time starter with Chicago. He did very little with the Cowboys.

Chuck McSwain, RB, Clemson, 1983-84

Statistics: McSwain averaged 20.0 yards per kickoff return for the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two years in Dallas.

Intangibles: He was injured early in 1983 and spent the 1984 seasons as one of Tony Dorsett’s backups. He later played as a replacement player with New England.

Jacques Reeves, CB, Purdue, 2004-2007

Statistics: Reeves recorded one interception as a Cowboy.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played four seasons with the Cowboys.

Intangibles: Reeves will probably be most remembered for his poor coverage on the New York Giants’ final drive of the first half in the Cowboys’ 2007 playoff loss. Reeves had filled in pretty well for starters Terence Newman and Anthony Henry when they were injured, but Reeves declined late in the season. He signed with the Texans in the offseason.

Kevin Scott, RB, Stanford, 1989

Statistics: Scott caught nine passes for 63 yards with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season with Dallas.

Intangibles: Scott was Herschel Walker’s backup but suffered an injury early in the 1989 season. He never played again.

Poll

Here are the results of the poll for this number:

Greatest #35

  • Calvin Hill (90%, 145 Votes)
  • Jimmy Armstrong (5%, 8 Votes)
  • Jacques Reeves (2%, 3 Votes)
  • Pete Gent (2%, 3 Votes)
  • Kevin Scott (1%, 2 Votes)
  • Scott Laidlaw (1%, 1 Votes)
  • Walt Kowalczyk (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Wendell Davis (0%, 0 Votes)
  • J.W. Lockett (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Jason McKie (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Chuck McSwain (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Robert Chancey (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 162

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My Vote: Hill

Calvin HillThere may be a few readers inclined to vote for Gent, assuming they are familiar with North Dallas Forty. But as far as contributions on the field, none of these players compares well with Hill. Hill was a Pro Bowler and an All-Pro selection as a rookie in 1969, and it appeared he was headed for greatness. Then along came a back named Duane Thomas, who was simply better than Hill was. Hill took a back seat for two seasons before returning to the role as full-time starter. He gained more than 1,000 yards in two seasons but suffered through some injuries in 1974.

Hill still serves as a consultant with the Cowboys, specializing in problem players. He will likely be called upon to help a few of the new guys, especially one named after a video game.

At least this guy seems to have calmed down…

Calvin Hill, Terrell Owens

Greatest Cowboys By Their Jersey Numbers: #34

Part of the Greatest Players by Number Series

Jersey #34

Ten players have worn #34, including six running backs and four defensive backs.

Tommie Agee, FB, Auburn, 1990-94

Statistics: Agee rushed for 304 yards with the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: Agee played five seasons with Dallas.

Intangibles: He was primarily a special teams player and a backup fullback. His real value was in the locker room, where players nicknamed him “The Reverend” thanks to his positive influence.

Deon Anderson, FB, Connecticut, 2007-

Statistics: Anderson caught six passes as a rookie in 2007.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He will enter his second season in 2008.

Intangibles: He showed promise as a pass-receiving fullback in 2007, but an injury cut his season short. Expect good things from him.

Fred Doelling, S, Pennsylvania, 1960

Statistics: Doelling started a few games at safety for the expansion Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played only one NFL season.

Intangibles: He was a free agent signee but did not last long.

Merrill Douglas, RB, Utah, 1961

Statistics: He rushed for 24 yards for the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one year in Dallas.

Intangibles: He was signed as a backup from the Chicago Bears. After one year, he moved on to Philadelphia.

Cornell Green, DB, Utah State, 1962-74

Statistics: Green recorded 34 interceptions during his career, tied for fifth in team history.

Accolades: He made the Pro Bowl five times and was named All Pro three times.

Longevity: He played 13 seasons in the NFL, all with Dallas.

Intangibles: Green developed into one of the best corners in the NFL by the late 1960s. Later in his career, he moved to strong safety and earned a trip to the Pro Bowl at that position.

Monty Hunter, S, Salem, 1982

Statistics: He recorded one sack for the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played one season in Dallas.

Intangibles: Dallas took a gamble on this player from tiny Salem College in West Virginia. He showed very little.

Tim Lester, FB, Eastern Kentucky, 1999

Statistics: He caught two passes for nine yards.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played in five games with Dallas.

Intangibles: Lester was a starter with the Pittsburgh Steelers. He signed with the Cowboys in 1999 to help ease the burden of Daryl Johnston’s loss, but he was not a factor.

Jamar Martin, FB, Ohio State, 2002-03

Statistics: Martin rushed for seven yards and caught two passes for the Cowboys.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: After being drafted in 2002, he saw his only action for the Cowboys in 2003.

Intangibles: He was subpar as a blocking fullback, which was his primary role with the Cowboys. He later played with the Dolphins and the Jets.

Aaron Mitchell, CB, Nevada-Las Vegas, 1979-80

Statistics: Mitchell recorded four interceptions with the Cowboys, including three in 1980.

Accolades: None.

Longevity: He played two seasons with Dallas.

Intangibles: Mitchell was a hard-hitting corner out of UNLV and showed some promise. However, his coverage skills were inferior, and he left for Tampa Bay in 1981.

Herschel Walker, RB, Georgia, 1986-89, 1996-97

Statistics: Walker rushed for 3491 and scored 27 touchdowns with Dallas.

Accolades: He was a two-time Pro Bowler with the Cowboys.

Longevity: He played in parts of a total of six seasons with Dallas.

Intangibles: Walker is best known as the centerpiece of the trade that allowed Dallas to draft the players who won three Super Bowls in the early 1990s. He was, to be sure, a great player, displaying great speed and hands for such a big back. However, teams had a difficult time developing an offense around him, and he never quite excelled as many thought he would. When he returned to Dallas in 1996, he played a very important role as a kickoff returner. He also filled in at fullback when Daryl Johnston was injured in 1997.

Poll

Here are the results of the poll for this number:

Greatest #34

  • Herschel Walker (57%, 119 Votes)
  • Cornell Green (42%, 89 Votes)
  • Deon Anderson (1%, 2 Votes)
  • Fred Doelling (0%, 1 Votes)
  • Aaron Mitchell (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Jamar Martin (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Tim Lester (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Monty Hunter (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Merrill Douglas (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Tommie Agee (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 210

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If you still want to vote, please make a comment below.

My Vote: Green

Cornell GreenAlthough Walker is better known, Green was a mainstay for many years and was an important part of some great Cowboys teams of the late 1960s and early 1970s. He contributed more to the franchise than anyone else on this list.