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Animated Trivia: Dallas Cowboys vs. L.A. Rams

Here is an animated GIF from an old-school game between the Dallas Cowboys and Los Angeles Rams. Trivia questions are below the image.


1. The Cowboys beat the Rams on Thanksgiving Day. During which season did this game take place?

2. Who was the L.A. running back being tackled by Bob Lilly and Cornell Green?

3. Which former Cowboy caught a 41-yard pass for the Rams?

4. Which Dallas player scored the winning touchdown in the fourth quarter?

5. The Rams had changed from their gold-and-blue uniforms to blue-and-white uniforms in 1965. When did the Rams return to gold and blue?

Dallas Cowboys: Highest Ranked Players of All Time

Larry Allen is among the Top 50 offensive players of all time.

Larry Allen is among the Top 50 offensive players of all time. has engaged in a project for some time now that allows users to vote on the all-time rankings of every NFL player. The project is known as Elo Rater.

Cowboys’ fans will not be happy to see the current rankings, as no Dallas player appears on the top 10 list for offense and only one player appears in the top 10 on defense.

Before I point out some B.S., here are the Cowboys rated in the top 50 for offense and defense:


17. Roger Staubach
26. Larry Allen

(I am not counting Lance Alworth, though he was a member of the Cowboys towards the end of his career. He ranks 10th.)


9. Bob Lilly
49. Deion Sanders

(Similarly, I am not counting Forrest Gregg as a Cowboy.)

Now for the criticism.

How many real experts would place Len Dawson in the top 20 offensive players of all time? Yes, he is a Hall-of-Fame player, but #15 overall?

Jim Brown ranks at #3. Gale Sayers is #5. Walter Payton is #6. Barry Sanders is #9. Emmitt Smith, who outrushed all of them? He ranks #130 behind the likes of Chuck Muncie, Calvin Hill, Bob Vogel, James Brooks, Jim Hart, and Jim Langer.


I am somewhat less critical of the defensive rankings, though I would rank Darren Woodson higher than #245 overall.

Animated Trivia: Bob Lilly Tackle vs. Cleveland Browns

We’ve been recovering from a flooded house, so no trivia during the past couple of weeks. Sorry.

Here is a play showing Bob Lilly tackling a Cleveland Browns running back. Trivia questions follow the image.


(1) During what year did this play occur?

(2) What was the significance of this game?

(3) Cleveland quarterback Bill Nelson threw three interceptions in the game. Charlie Waters picked off one of those passes. Who recorded the other two interceptions?

Photo Trivia: Randy White at Maryland

In 2014, the Dallas Cowboys must replace a team legend by finding someone to fill DeMarcus Ware’s role. Ware was, of course, the team’s best defensive player for nine seasons.

In 1975, the Cowboys faced a somewhat similar problem, having to replace defensive tackle Bob Lilly, who had retired. Dallas had the second overall pick in the draft and selected Randy White of Maryland.

White accomplished a few things in Dallas, earning Super Bowl MVP honors and becoming a member of the Hall of Fame.

Here’s a trivia question, answered in the photo puzzle below: what number did White wear at Maryland?

* * *

Here’s another picture of White before he joined the Cowboys. He is playing with the College All-Stars against the Pittsburgh Steelers. I took a moment to hide the first number.



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Cowboys on Pro-Football-Reference’s All-Decade Teams

Pro-Football-Reference has created its own version of All-Decade teams using its formula for calculating approximate value. This is an effort to provide an objective measurement of each player’s value, so it is (or should be) less subjective than other similar lists.


The Cowboys are not especially well-represented. For instance, only two Cowboys made the list for the All-1970s team even though the Cowboys went to five Super Bowls during the decade.

I have compiled the list below that identifies the Cowboy players who made each all-decade team. I only included players who actually played for the Cowboys during the respective decade. Thus, I included Mike Ditka for the 1960s team because he played for Dallas in 1969. However, I excluded Herb Adderley, who made the 1960s team but did not play for Dallas until 1970.

Key: Position, 1st or 2nd Team: Name, Years Played for Dallas During the Respective Decade


RB, 2nd Team: Don Perkins, 1961-1968

WR, 2nd Team: Tommy McDonald, 1964

TE, 1st Team: Mike Ditka, 1969

DT, 2nd Team: Bob Lilly, 1961-1969

LB, 2nd Team: Chuck Howley, 1961-1969

CB, 2nd Team: Cornell Green, 1962-1969


QB, 1st Team: Roger Staubach, 1970-1979

S, 2nd Team: Cliff Harris, 1970-1979


RB, 2nd Team: Tony Dorsett, 1980-1987

DE, 1st Team: Too Tall Jones, 1980-1989

DT, 1st Team: Randy White, 1980-1988


RB, 1st Team: Emmitt Smith, 1990-1999

WR, 1st Team: Michael Irvin, 1990-1999

C, 2nd Team: Mark Stepnoski, 1990-1994, 1999

PR, 1st Team: Deion Sanders, 1995-1999


WR, 2nd Team: Terrell Owens, 2006-2008

G, 2nd Team: Larry Allen, 2000-2005

DT, 2nd Team: La’Roi Glover, 2002-2005

LB, 2nd Team: DeMarcus Ware, 2005-2009


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Dallas Cowboys Most Obscure Player Awards for 1965-1969 (Recap)


Here are the remainder of the MOP Award “winners” from the 1960s. This list includes seasons from 1965 to 1969.  I wrote several of these during the offseason in 2007 before I got a bit off track.

Click here for my previous recap covering the years 1960 to 1964.

1965: Pete Gent

North Dallas FortyHe is famous as the author of North Dallas Forty, but few remember his performances on the field. Gent caught his first pass in 1965, finishing with 16 receptions for 233 yards and 2 touchdowns. His best season was 1966, when he caught 27 passes for 474 yards, a 17.6-yard-per-catch, but he only caught 25 more passes in his last two years with the team.



1966: Willie Townes

Townes played three seasons with the Cowboys and started 25 games in the late 1960s. His first start came in 1966 in a game against the Steelers, and he was part of the NFL Championship Games against the Packers. However, he faded into obscurity after missing the 1969 seasons and playing six games for the Saints in 1970.



1967: Ron East

Ron East

East joined the Cowboys in 1967 from Montana State. He played with the Cowboys for four seasons before being traded to San Diego in 1970 along with Pettis Norman and Tony Liscio for receiver Lance Alworth. East played for San Diego for three years, then moved from Cleveland, Atlanta, and Seattle. Someone left this note about him after I named him the MOP Award winner for 1967:

Ron East is now a Real Estate Developer in Seattle, WA. He was the 5th D-lineman for the Cowboys 67-71. Ron was a backup for defensive tackles Lilly and Pugh. He and others felt that he won the starting job in 1970 However they gave the job to Pugh. Because of that Ron Asked for a trade after the 1970 season and it was granted. He and two other players went to San Diego for Lance Alworth in 1971. I attended the Tom Landry ring of honor dinner with Ron and met Bob Lilly. I saw heard Bob say to Ron “Thanks for winning our first superbowl for us when you asked for the trade.” Ron was a Devensive standout in San Diego and Seattle. He was noted for solidifying Earl Morral’s legacy by breaking Bob Greise’s ankle in game 5 of the 1972 season.

1968: Craig Baynham

Craig Baynham

Here is a blurb about Craig Baynham’s nickname, courtesy of Tim’s Cowboy’s History Page:

Baynham’s biggest moment came in the 1967 conference playoff game against the Browns when he filled in for the injured Walt Garrison. He scored 3 touchdowns in the 52-14 win. In 1968 he subbed for Garrison gaining 438 yards on the ground and grabbed 29 passes for 380 yards. He led the team in kickoff returns in 68 with 590 yards. He didn’t get much playing time behind a healthy Hill and Garrison in 69 and was traded to Chicago in 1970 and finished his career with St. Louis the next year. Nicknamed “John One Dozen” because he always signed footballs “Craig Baynham – John 1:12?, he became a pastor in later years.

Baynham caught a touchdown pass in the last Playoff Bowl game ever played between the Cowboys and Vikings. In the three seasons following his performance in 1968, though, Baynham amassed a grand total of 109 yards, including a loss of two yards on three carries in 1969.

1969: Dennis Homan

Dennis Homan was the top pick of the Cowboys in the 1968 draft. In his three seasons with Dallas, the 1969 season was his best, catching 12 passes for 240 yards, but no touchdowns. He lasted one more year with the Cowboys before playing two seasons with Kansas City.

Homan joined the Birmingham franchise of the World Football League, where he became a star! There is, in fact, an entire page (with pictures) focusing on his accomplishments with the WFL. I also learned from that page that Homan was a kick holder in his final season with Birmingham, which makes his selection all the more appropriate.


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Rest in Peace, Jerry Tubbs

There was sad news today as former linebacker and assistant coach Jerry Tubbs died at the age of 77.

He played during a time before many of us were around to watch the Cowboys. He was, though, associated with the team for just as long as Tex Schramm and Tom Landry, and more should be familiar with who he was.

He was a first-round draft pick of the Chicago Cardinals in 1957 but did little to stand out during his first three years in the NFL. The San Francisco 49ers left him unprotected in the 1960 expansion draft, and the Dallas Cowboys acquired him.

Tubbs played middle linebacker in Tom Landry‘s 4-3 defense. Anyone who has heard of Sam Huff knows the importance of the MLB in this system.

He was part of the first core group of players for the Cowboys. In 1962, he earned a berth in the Pro Bowl along side Bob Lilly and Don Bishop. That marked the first year that a defensive player for Dallas made the Pro Bowl.

He remained a starter until 1966, when Lee Roy Jordan moved over to the middle. Tubbs suffered a back injury in 1966 and played in only four games.

Tubbs joined the Dallas coaching staff in 1968 and remained as an assistant until the end of the Tom Landry era in 1989.

He was survived by his wife, Marlene.

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