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Efren Herrera Trivia


I posted a link on Facebook yesterday to an article listing the Dallas Cowboys All Career-Year Team. I wouldn’t agree with every selection, but it is still an interesting piece.

One surprise was the selection of Efren Herrera’s 1977 season as the greatest ever. I call this a surprise because Herrera only hit 62.1% of his field goals that season (and missed two extra points), and he was gone one year later. (I would have picked Rafael Septien’s 1981 season.) Nevertheless, Herrera was an all-pro selection in 1977, so it was not as if he didn’t deserve consideration.

Now for some trivia: why did the Cowboys trade Herrera to Seattle?

The short answer is that Herrera was demanding too much money. In fact, he wanted to double his salary from 1976.

Double means going from about $40,000 per year to about $80,000 per year. In 2016 dollars, that would be like Herrera asking for a raise from $159,000 to $318,000. Of course, the current minimum veteran salary for a fourth-year pro (which Herrera was in 1978) is $760,000.

Salary of current kicker Dan Bailey in 2016? $3.3 million, including his prorated signing bonus.

Dallas traded Herrera to Seattle on August 14, 1978, in exchange for a fifth-round draft pick. He played for Seattle for four years and became somewhat famous for his involvement with trick plays. In fact, he caught two passes for a total of 29 yards.

He played part of one season in Buffalo. He was signed by a couple of USFL teams but did not play in that league.

After the trade with Seattle in 1978, Dallas was left with unheralded Jay Sherrill and Skip Butler at kicker. Fortunately, the Cowboys were able to sign Septien as a free agent about two weeks after trading Herrera.

Quote Trivia: Jerry Jones, the Liar

Jerry opened his mouth. Again.

Jerry opened his mouth. Again.

As usual, Jerry Jones opens his mouth, leaving fans of the Dallas Cowboys, once again, to figure out his priorities.

The latest controversy has focused on a statement Jerry made where he appears to brag about the Cowboys having high television ratings. This led an ESPN writer to write that Jerry is sending the wrong message by accepting mediocrity. Here is my Facebook post on this subject:


This leads us to today’s quote trivia. Jerry at one time had to deal with a player facing suspension, but Jerry was less than forthcoming about the facts of the player’s case. Jerry made the following statement:

What I have said, very consistently and very firmly over the last two weeks, is that if there was a suspension, I would be the first to know, because that’s the way I have it set up with the league. But me knowing cannot and did not go beyond notification of suspension. Outside of what I read in the papers, I knew nothing about this until late Tuesday afternoon.

Trivia questions:

(1) Which player was suspended?

(2) During which year was this player initially suspended?

(3) Which area writer called Jerry a liar in print?




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Dallas vs. San Francisco, When the Cowboys Were Defending Super Bowl Champions

NFC Championship Game logo, 2001–2005

Foreign territory for the modern Dallas Cowboys.

The San Francisco 49ers are preparing for their third consecutive appearance in the NFC Championship Game.

Meanwhile, the Dallas Cowboys have done a whole bunch of nothing since losing to the Eagles to end the season. Pretty good chance we will continue to see a whole bunch of nothing.

My prediction on Facebook:


Anyway, for lack of anything else to discuss at the moment, here is a video from 1996 on ESPN’s Primetime showing the Cowboys’ 20-17 win over the 49ers. The win improved the Cowboys’ record to 6-4 in a season where Dallas pulled out another NFC East title.

Ah, memories. Distant, distant memories.

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Player to Remember from 1986: Johnny Holloway

I really mean no disrespect whatsoever to players recognized with the Most Obscure Player Award.  It was one of the first ideas I came up with when I launched this blog in 2006, and I am just now getting around to finishing the series. It is just a way to identify some long-forgotten members of the team.

Johnny Holloway's interception against the St. Louis Cardinals (and his posts on this site) earned him the Player to Remember Award for 1986.

Johnny Holloway’s interception against the St. Louis Cardinals (and his posts on this site and Facebook) earned him the Player to Remember Award for 1986.

In the years I have written this blog, I have had a few other bloggers link to posts.  Unfortunately for me, relatively few of the 833,000 visitors on here have left comments.

And only one of those visitors was a current or former member of the Cowboys. That was a former defensive back named Johnny Holloway.

He left a comment on here in 2008, and Fred Goodwin of Dallas Cowboys Books Blog recognized him. I just happened to have a video of Holloway’s only interception as a professional, which occurred against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1986.

I posted the story in March 2008. The video no longer works, and unfortunately, I cannot seem to find the video file.

Anyway, we are now up to the 1986 season for the Most Obscure Player Award, and I just have to give it to Mr. Holloway. He played one year in Dallas, managing one interception while playing in 16 games. He served as a replacement player with the Cardinals for three games in 1987.

But before I put the mop image for the selection from 1986, someone made a comment on one of my Facebook posts about the MOP Award for 1984 (featuring Norm Granger).

The person who made the comment? Johnny (or Jon) Holloway.

So just for one year covered in this series, I am changing the award to the Player to Remember Award. It is not accompanied with a mop graphic.

And thanks for the comments, Mr. Holloway. Once I find the video file with the interception, I will post it again.

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An Unusual Year in the Cowboys-Eagles Series

The Cowboys and Eagles had losing records in both of their games in 1963, including this 27-20 Dallas win on November 17.

The Dallas Cowboys and Philadelphia Eagles have faced one another 107 times, including the playoffs, since 1960. The Cowboys lead the series 60-47.

The rivalry is not especially interesting this year. Dallas entered the first game at 3-5 and came away with the 38-23 win. The Eagles were also 3-5.

On Sunday, the Eagles are 3-8. The Cowboys are 5-6.

This marks the first time since 1963 that the teams will play each other twice when each team had a losing record. In fact, in the 52-year history of the rivalry, this has occurred only two times.

Below is a summary. The numbers in the parentheses indicate each team’s record entering into the game.


Dallas (1-2-1) 41, Philadelphia (1-3) 19

Philadelphia (2-8-1) 28, Dallas (4-5-1) 14


Philadelphia (0-2-1) 28, Dallas (0-3) 14

Dallas (2-7) 27, Philadelphia (2-6-1) 20

* * *

I posted this on Facebook yesterday:

The Cowboys are 5-6 for only the third time in team history if we disregard ties. In 1962, the Cowboys were 5-6-1 but finished at 5-8-1. Trivia: in what season other than 2012 did the Cowboys start 5-6, and what was the team’s final record that season?

The answer is 1987, which was the year of the replacement players. Just as they did in 2012, the Cowboys in 1987 hosted the Thanksgiving Day game at 5-5 and needed a win to stay alive in the playoff chase. Instead, the Vikings knocked off the Cowboys in overtime, and Dallas ended up missing the playoffs with a 7-8 record.


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